The First-Person-Plural Imperative
(El imperativo de la primera persona del plural)
¡Vamos a
operarlo de
inmediato!
No, no lo
operemos
todavía.
¡Ay, mi
madre!
De acuerdo.
Primero,
hagámosle unos
análisis más.
The imperative of nosotros
The expression “ir a” plus infinitive, as we
already know, generally indicates a future activity
that someone will engage in.
Los niños van a tener una fiesta
mañana.
The children are going to have a party
tomorrow.
The imperative of nosotros
However, one of the most common uses of the
nosotros form of this construction is to suggest that
some persons, including the speaker, do something
together.
¡Vamos a tener una fiesta mañana!
Let’s have a party tomorrow!
Notice that this usage is emphatic and is
often accompanied by exclamation marks
when expressed in writing.
The imperative of nosotros
But an alternative way of making such suggestions
is to use a nosotros command form, that is, the
present subjunctive for nosotros.
¡Tengamos una fiesta mañana!
Let’s have a party tomorrow!
Curiously, the long form (vamos a . . . )
is more frequently used.
The imperative of nosotros
However, the negative nosotros command
is formed exclusively with . . .
¡No tengamos una fiesta mañana!
Let’s not have a party tomorrow!
“No vamos a tener una fiesta mañana” is a simple
statement, “We’re not going to have a party
tomorrow,” and cannot be used as a command form.
The imperative of nosotros
As with all command forms, object pronouns are
attached to the end of the affirmative forms and
precede the negative commands.
Busquemos al enfermero.
Let’s look for the nurse.
Busquémoslo.
Let’s look for him.
In affirmative commands with an attached pronoun,
an accent mark is added to maintain the original
stress.
The imperative of nosotros
As with all command forms, object pronouns are
attached to the end of the affirmative forms and
precede the negative commands.
No molestemos a la paciente.
Let’s not bother the patient.
la
No molestemos.
Let’s not bother her.
The imperative of nosotros
With reflexive constructions and the pronoun
combinations selo, sela, selos and selas, the final
s of the affirmative subjunctive command form
is omitted before adding the pronoun(s).
¡Vamos a lavarnos las manos!
¡Lavémos nos las manos!
The imperative of nosotros
With reflexive constructions and the pronoun
combinations selo, sela, selos and selas, the final
s of the affirmative subjunctive command form
is omitted before adding the pronoun(s).
¡Vamos a dárselo!
¡Démos selo!
The imperative of nosotros
With the verb ir, the indicative form is used as the
affirmative command—never the subjunctive.
¡Vamos al cine!
Let’s go to the movies!
¡Vayamos al cine!
Nor do we ever use the ir a + infinitive command
form with the verb ir.
¡Vamos a ir al cine!
“Vamos a ir al cine” is a simple statement—“We’re
going to go to the movies.”—not a command.
The imperative of nosotros
However, the negative ir command reverts, as
you might suspect, to the subjunctive.
¡No vayamos al cine!
Let’s not go to the movies!
The imperative of nosotros
The reflexive form of the verb, irse, follows a
similar pattern.
¡Vámonos!
Let’s get out of here!
¡Vamos a irnos!
¡No nos vayamos!
Let’s not leave!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
Let’s read a story! . . . ?
¡Vamos a leer un cuento!
¡Leamos un cuento!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not read! Let’s eat pizza! . . . ?
¡No, no leamos!
Long form:
Short form:
¡Vamos a comer pizza!
¡Comamos pizza!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not eat! Let’s sing a song! . . . ?
¡No, no comamos!
Long form:
¡Vamos a cantar una canción!
Short form:
¡Cantemos una canción!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not sing! Let’s watch TV! . . . ?
¡No, no cantemos!
Long form:
¡Vamos a mirar la tele!
Short form:
¡Miremos la tele!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not watch TV! Let’s dance! . . . ?
¡No, no miremos la tele!
Long form:
¡Vamos a bailar!
Short form:
¡Bailemos!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not dance! Let’s write a letter! . . . ?
¡No, no bailemos!
Long form:
¡Vamos a escribir una carta!
Short form:
¡Escribamos una carta!
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not write! Let’s get out of here! . . . ?
¡No, no escribamos!
Long form:
¡Vámonos!
Short form:
¡Vámonos!
The verbs ir and irse have only one form, remember?
The imperative of nosotros
¡Vamos a practicar! (¡Practiquemos!)
¿Cómo se dice . . .
No, let’s not leave! Let’s study Spanish! . . . ?
¡No, no nos vayamos!
Long form:
¡Vamos a estudiar español!
Short form:
¡Estudiemos español!
FIN
Descargar

Vamos