IMPLEMENTING INTERVENTIONS
AND PROGRESS MONITORING
Shelly Dickinson
MTSS Trainer
Expected Outcomes
• Participants will…
• Understand how to use the tiered framework to
provide interventions
• Learn the components of an effective
intervention
• Match interventions (resources) with specific
skill deficits
• Recognize the requirements of progress
monitoring in the MTSS process
WHAT DOES INSTRUCTION
LOOK LIKE IN A
MULTI-TIERED FRAMEWORK?
A Multi-Tiered Framework of Instruction
3 Tier Model
Planning Standards-Aligned
Instruction Within MTSS
Table Talk
• How does instruction intensify throughout the tiers:
Core
Supplemental
Intensive?
• How does looking at assessments (students responding to
instruction) change throughout the tiers? What types of data are
we collecting? How often?
• How does the planning address student engagement throughout
the tiers?
Core
Supplemental
Intensive
Instruction
Assessments
Student
Engagement
What are the Components of MTSS?
Speaking the LINGO!
1.
Tiers of Instruction: Students who do not respond to high-quality
standards-based classroom instruction (Tier 1) and supplemental
instruction (Tier 2) receive more intensive, individualized evidencebased instruction (Tier 3). Tiers are the level of intensity of the
intervention.
2.
Progress Monitoring: Data-based documentation of repeated
assessments reflecting student progress.
3.
Data Based Decision Making: Students who don’t respond to these
interventions or require a highly individualized program to progress are
evaluated in a more comprehensive manner.
Interventions
Let’s Discuss
Define Intervention
• Instruction that supplements and intensifies
classroom curriculum/instruction to meet the
need of the student
• Teach NEW skills to remediate a deficient skill
• Interventions are developed to help the student
acquire the necessary skills to be able to
eventually succeed independently
Types of Interventions
• Skill Deficit
– Student lacks skills to successfully complete
task
• Performance Deficit
– Factors interfering with student’s capability of
performing the skill
Match the Intervention
to the Skill Deficit/Student Need
• What is the root cause of the problem?
–
–
–
–
Lack of Phonological Awareness
Phonics/Decoding/Text Processing
Fluency
Comprehension
• Performance deficit or skill deficit?
• Without a match, student will be practicing skills that
are good, but not directly related to what they need
to make progress
Classroom Interventions
CRITICAL AREAS
Reading– Phonemic awareness
– Phonics/decoding
– Fluency
– Vocabulary
– Comprehension
Math– Conceptual understanding
– Procedural fluency
– Strategic competence
– Adaptive reasoning
– Productive disposition
Consider instructional hierarchy
– Acquisition
– Fluency
– Generalization
– Adaptation
Behavior
– Obtain something
– Attention
– Escape or avoid something
• Task
• Setting
– Poorly developed skills
What is Not an Intervention?
• Guided reading group or use of leveled reading
materials
• Small flexible groups for projects
• Moving a student’s seat
• Review and practice independently
• Scaffolding or differentiating the task during core
instruction
• Guided writing and conferencing
• Word walls, editing check lists, etc.
• Regular best teaching practices automatically used
in response to an immediate need such as extended
time, repeated directions
Intervention or Not?
1. A group of 6 students in Mrs. Jones’s 3rd grade class is receiving
guided reading using Level L materials, 3x per week for 20 minutes
with the classroom teacher.
2. A group of 4 students in Mr. Smith’s 4th grade
are working with the teacher 4x per week for 15
minutes to increase math procedural fluency.
Immediate feedback is provided and
motivational activities are used. Progress
monitoring data was collected weekly using a
Math Probe.
Turn and Talk
3. A student was not able to have his materials ready at the start of each
period; thereby impacting the student’s overall academic performance
in the classroom. The teacher charted how often this was an issue as
compared to his peers. The teacher designed a file system for the
student and monitored his progress (assignment completion) each
period for 3 weeks.
Intervention
Infrastructure
Infrastructure Necessary for
Intervention Implementation
Leadership
Capacity Building/Infrastructure
• MTSS vision/mission aligned with • Organized and strategic capacity
the School Improvement Plan (SIP)
building for implementation
• School-based leadership team
• Master schedule that allows time for
data collection
• MTSS implementation plan
• Master schedule that allows time for
collaboration
Data-Based Problem Solving
• Master schedule that allows time for
• Data-based problem solving
multiple tiers of intervention
Communication and Collaboration
• Communicated expectations and
accountability
Multiple Tiers of Support
• Resource allocation
– Materials, personnel, etc
Intervention Model for Elementary
• Intervention block is 30 minutes a day. It is scheduled
throughout the day based on grade level scheduling:
– Model 1: Teachers keep their own students; provide
small group instruction and blended learning using
computer programs
– Model 2: Grade levels divide up students based on
needs and each teacher has a group.
– Model 3: Partnering Teachers Share Students –
Good model if too many teachers on a grade level or
for intermediate teachers. Good model for location
barriers.
Model: Walk to Intervention School-Wide
– Who: Grade level teachers, instructional asst., ESE
teachers, (5th and 6th), speech, all hands on deck.
– When: 8:15 – 8:45 am (Grades 1 - 6)
– How:
• Group students by skill deficit, enrichment area, reading or
math.
• Smallest group should be for the neediest kids and
instructed by most qualified
• Work as a grade level to determine resources, instruction,
who’s teaching what
Intervention Cycles
– Cycle: a three week period of continuous supplemental
instruction
– Progress Monitoring: occurs after a 3 week cycle. Progress
monitoring data is gathered. At risk students are re-assessed.
Teachers meet to reorganize groups and instructors.
–
–
–
–
Cycle 1: September 7 – 24
Progress Monitoring Week: Sept. 27 – Oct. 1
Cycle 2: October 4 – 22
Progress Monitoring Week: Oct. 25 -29
– What are the barriers?
Compromise, Integrity, Flexibility, ?????
3rd Grade – Walk to Intervention (Turner Elementary)
CVC
Skill 2
(Jungovich 506)
Sherman
Tiffany
Gabriel
Jane
Bob
Ross
DeeDee
Trevor
Walsh
Jake
Kayla
Ray
(9)
CVC
Skill 2
(Mazziotti 801)
SRA
Jungovich
Caleb
Sara
Travis
Dwight
Ashley
(5)
Instructional Delivery:
Instructional
95% Group Phonics
Delivery: SRA
Library Lessons and
Decodable Text for Skill
2
Progress
Monitoring Tool: PSI
Form B and C
Blends Skill 3
(Ross 507)
Jungovich
Bradlee
Lillie
Terri
Walsh
Christopher
Ross(6)
Joe
Tom
Comp/Fluency
Voyager
(Shelton/Pagan)
Pagan Group (3rd Grade Pod)
Jungovich
Sara
Joe
Logan
Lucia
Daniel
Walsh
Charles
A.J.
Jospeh
Colton (9)
(Room 501)
Trenton
Dante J
Dave
Moe
Nick
Andrews
Tommi
Ross
David
Megan
Shane
Najet
Jamie
James
Diamond
Cassandra (15)
Instructional
Instructional Delivery:
Delivery: 95% Group Voyager Passport F
Phonics Library
Lessons and
Decodable Text for
Skill 3
Progress
Progress
Progress
Monitoring Tool: PSI Monitoring Tool: PSI Monitoring Tool:
Form B and C
Form B and C
Voyager Passport RCT
Comprehension
Anthologies
(Walsh 504)
Jungovich
Zachary
Kari
Kate
Nick
Pam
Dan
Jon
Derrick
Bry
Ed
Wyatt
Joey
Sam
Bobby
Walsh
Jim
Dana
Bill
Elaina
Javier
(19)
Comprehension
Anthologies
( 505)
Walsh
George
Sophia
Harvey
Ken
Christina
Silvia
Stever
Eli
Brianna
Abel
Ross
Ethan
Destiny
Aiden
Chris
Tristi
Melina
Ki
Kevin
Jescee
Dylan
Alexis
Ericka
(22)
Instructional Delivery:
Instructional
Comprehension through Delivery:
Anthologies
Comprehension
through Anthologies
Progress Monitoring
Tool:
CARS
Progress Monitoring
Tool: CARS
Riviera Elementary – Grade 2
Intervention Groups
Brainstorm At Your Table…
• What are the barriers that interfere with
intervention implementation?
• Complete the Problem/Solution T-Chart at
your table.
PROBLEM
SOLUTION
CHOOSING AN EFFECTIVE
INTERVENTION
What Makes an Intervention
Evidenced-Based and Effective?
 All the prominent trusted sources for
information concerning evidenced-based
interventions in reading, math, writing, and
behavior point to eight components that
make an intervention effective.
 A good intervention program either has the
following components built in or the teacher
builds them in.
Page 99
Explicit Instruction
• Explicit Instruction is overt teaching of the steps
or processes needed to understand a construct,
apply a strategy, and/or complete a task.
• Explicit instruction includes teacher
presentation of new material, teacher modeling,
and step-by-step demonstration of what is
expected, so that students can accomplish a
learning task.
Systematic Instruction
• Systematic Instruction is complex skills broken
down into smaller, manageable “chunks” of
learning and requires careful consideration of
how best to teach these discrete pieces to
achieve the overall learning goal.
• Systematic instruction includes sequencing
learning chunks from easy to difficult and
providing scaffolding to control the level of
difficulty throughout the learning process.
Systematic Instruction
Table Activity
Less Systematic
Instruction
• Given this lesson, what might
struggling students find challenging
about learning to measure objects to
the nearest inch?
• How could you adapt this lesson to
make it more systematic?
More Systematic
Instruction
• List at least three ways this lesson
was adapted to make it more
systematic.
Visual Representations
• Visual Representations: Any visual cues that
a student can use to self prompt for
identifying and organizing pieces of relevant
information. This helps the student to
summarize what key information is needed
to solve the problem.
Teach Students How to
Use Visual Representations
Excellent resource of “Best Practices in Action”
• Modeling
• Think-Alouds
• Scaffolding
• Visual Representations
Think-Aloud Modeling
• Think-Aloud Modeling: Students should be
exposed to teacher modeling of how to think
through the strategy or problem.
• The teacher should use language the
student may use in their own thinking
combined with the strategy steps.
Here’s How a Teacher’s
Modeling Might Sound…
Think-Aloud Modeling Example
• “First, I ask myself, ‘What is this problem about and what
do I need to find the answer? I see that the problem asks
me to compare two different product sizes to see which is
the better value. So I’ll need the product sizes, and I’ll
need to know the cost of each item.
• “Once I’ve got that answer, I ask myself, ‘Have I ever seen
a problem like this before?’ I think this is similar to the
problems we had about finding the volume of different
containers and also the problem of comparing prices.
• “Then I ask myself, ‘What steps should I take to solve the
problem?’”
• This practice is also beneficial when reviewing concepts
and activities that the students have encountered before.
Thinking aloud through the process helps students build
good problem-solving habits.
Guided Practice
Guided Practice: In a small group setting the teacher
should…
• Incorporate goal setting and self-monitoring of
progress toward the goal to increase student
attention, motivation, and effort
• Explicitly teach the skill
• Model solving the problem using think-aloud
• Scaffold practice by solving part of the first few
practice problems (prompting) and then guiding
students to finish
• Provide more opportunities for response and
corrective feedback
Guided Practice Example
Subtracting
Fractions
using Fraction
Tiles
Guided Practice Example Cont.
Fidelity and Group Size
• With fidelity: The intervention is consistently
given by the same person on specified days and
times. The student attends the intervention on
specified days and times.
• In a small group setting
or individual basis
MTSS
Guidebook
page 102
INSTRUCTIONAL
RESOURCES WITH
BUILT-IN
INTERVENTION
STRATEGIES
Instructional Resources
What Works
Clearinghouse
National
Center on
Intensive
Intervention
Instructional Resources
What Works
Clearinghouse
Instructional Resources
What Works
Clearinghouse
Please Note: These examples
are for illustrative purposes
only; we are not endorsing
any specific products.
Instructional Resources
• CPALMS - Collaborate, Plan, Align, Learn, Motivate,
Share
• eIPEP - Electronic Institutional Program Evaluation
Plans
• ELFAS - English Language Arts Formative Assessment
System
• IBTP - Items Bank and Test Platform
• FSL - Florida School Leaders
• PMRN - Progress Monitoring and Reporting Network
Instructional Resources
ELFAS Resources
The IRIS Center
Instructional routines for Small Groups
Learn Zillion
Read Write Think
Reading Rockets
Teaching Channel
Why Teach Spelling
Latin and Greek Word Elements
Persuasive Speeches: Planning a Lesson Series
Webinar: Writing and Writing Instruction
to Improve Reading: What We Have Learned from Research
Instructional Resources:
Vocabulary
Anita Archer Strategic Literacy Videos
Visuwords
Vocabulary Instruction:
Vocabulary building:
Building Vocabulary: Prefixes,
Common Content Area Roots and Affixes:
Teaching Morphology: Enhancing
Vocabulary Development and Reading
Comprehension
Improve your Vocabulary:
Double Your Vocabulary in a Month via Latin & Greek roots:
Instructional Resources:
Comprehension
Graphic Organizers:
Intervention Central:
Learning Network:
Reading Quest:
ReadWriteThink:
Research and Reading:
Research to Practice Brief:
Stem Starters:
Reading Comprehension Strategies:
TeacherVision:
Seven Strategies to Teach Students Text Comprehension:
Reading Strategies for the Secondary Classroom:
ReadWriteThink- Graphic Organizers:
Instructional Resources
Syntactic Knowledge Resources
Cohesive writing:
Cohesion:
Skill focus: Cohesion
Examples of Cohesive Features:
Persuasive Writing Marking Guide:
Cohesion Rubric
Connectives: Fitting Another Piece of
the Vocabulary Instruction Puzzle
Instructional Resources:
Handwriting , Spelling, Keyboarding
Read Write Think
Why Teach Spelling (Checklist)
Webinar: Writing and Writing Instruction to Improve
Reading: What We Have Learned from Research
Latin and Greek Word Elements (Root Words, Roots and Affixes)
Persuasive Speeches: Planning a Lesson Series
Computer Skills – Keyboarding Skills
Keyboarding Activities
Powertyping
Math Instructional Resources
National Center on Intensive
Intervention
These documents offer examples of how to apply
standards-relevant instruction across core instruction,
supplemental intervention, and intensive intervention
as well as to support students with significant cognitive
disabilities. Standards-based examples include the
following math topics: computation of fractions,
fractions as numbers, number system/counting, place
value, basic facts, and algebra.. The NCII also has
developed sample lessons and activities related to the
standards to support special education teachers,
interventionists and others working with students with
intensive needs. See the sample lessons and activities.
Self Regulated Strategy Resources
Graphic Organizers:
Writing Instructional Chart
Reading Quest:
ReadWriteThink:
Research and Reading:
ReadWriteThink- Graphic Organizers:
BUILDING A BANK OF
INTERVENTION
RESOURCES
Where do I get
these
INTERVENTIONS?
Inventory
Your
Resources
And Try to Develop
More!
Build your Library of Interventions
PROGRESS MONITORING
Using Progress Monitoring within the MTSS Framework
What is Progress Monitoring?
Progress-Monitoring measures are ongoing
assessments conducted for the purposes of:
Guiding Instruction
Monitoring Student Progress
Evaluating Instruction/Intervention Effectiveness
Progress Monitoring Data :
Is What We Are Doing Working?
 Progress Monitoring Data determines students’ Response
to Instruction using:
 Tier 1 Data
 Universal Screenings
 Inventories
 District Assessments
 Tier 1 Unit/Weekly Assessments
 Tier 2 Data
 Collecting intervention data at least every 2 to 3 weeks (IPST Form7)
 ORF, MAZE, DIBELS Next, CBM (General Outcome Measures)
 Teacher Made Assessments (Mastery Measurement)
 Tier 3 Data
 Weekly (IPST Form 7)
 Measuring Specific Targeted Skills (Mastery Measurement)
 Continually adjusting instruction based on OPM data to meet student’s needs
Wrap Up
THANK YOU
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