Presentation CGCS BIRE Conference
MAY 18, 2013
ACADEMIC SUCCESS FOR
IMMIGRANT YOUTH
CMSD Transformation Plan
International Newcomers Academy
Cleveland’s Plan for
Transforming Schools


Reinventing public education in our city
and serving as a model for the state of
Ohio
Principal Focus: Significantly increase
the number of high –performing schools
while reducing and eventually eliminating
low-performing schools
Grow the number of high-performing
district and charter schools in
Cleveland and close and replace
failing schools.
Focus district's central office on
key support and governance
roles and transfer authority
and resources to schools.
Cleveland's Portfolio
Schools Strategy
Create the Cleveland
Transformation Alliance to ensure
accountability for all public schools
in the city.
Invest and phase in high-leverage
system reforms across all schools
from preschool to college and career.
Becoming a portfolio district: Choices that
children deserve
The Cleveland Plan
•
•
•
•
Promote and expand high-performing schools
Start new schools
Strengthen mid-performing schools
Repurpose low-performing schools
CMSD’s CEO: Legal obligations under HB 525
Corrective Action schools
• Identify schools each year in need of corrective
action, what corrective action is warranted for
each school, and when the plan should be
implemented
• Invite all labor organizations to form Corrective
Action Teams to make recommendations on
implementation of the corrective plans
The Time is Right for CMSD
The Cleveland Plan
H.B. 525
15-mill
tax levy
It is not enough to become a premier
school district.
Key message
CMSD must become a district of
premier schools.
We must accomplish two goals
simultaneously
Prepare to implement
effective practices in
a subset of high-need
schools starting
August 2013
Engage the
community and
conduct in-depth
reviews to design an
equitable change
process
• Select Year One Investment
Schools based on a variety of
criteria
• Collaborate with proven partners to
dramatically change schools
• Engage families and educators at
the school level to design highleverage interventions for each
building
• Across multiple neighborhoods,
engage families and educators in
meaningful dialogue
• Design and communicate a
transparent and equitable process
for the next three years of CMSD
Transformation through Investment
We examined CMSD schools across
multiple criteria
Candidate
School
School 1
School 2
School 3
School 4
School 5
School 6
School 7
School 8
School 9
School 10
School 11
School 12
Academic Culture,
achieveme teamwork,
nt
vision
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Strong
school
leaders
X
Motivate Rigorous
d caring instructio
teachers
n
X
X
X
X
X
X
Social &
emotional
support for
students
X
X
Family
engagement
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Research base: High performing, high poverty schools
4. Shared responsibility for
achievement
1. Safety, discipline & engagement
Students feel secure and inspired to learn.
2. Action against adversity
readiness to
LEARN
readiness to
TEACH
Staff feel deep accountability and missionary
zeal for student achievement.
5. Personalization of instruction
Schools directly address the challenges faced
by students living in poverty.
Individualized teaching based on diagnostic
assessment and adjustable time on task.
3. Close student-adult relationships
6. Professional teaching culture
Students have positive and enduring
mentor/teacher relationships.
Continuous improvement through
collaboration and job-embedded learning.
readiness to
ACT
7. Resource authority
8. Resource ingenuity
School leaders can make mission-driven
decisions regarding people, time, money,
and programs.
Leaders are adept at securing additional
resources and leveraging partner
relationships.
9. Agility in the face of turbulence
Leaders, teachers, and systems are flexible
and inventive responding to constant unrest.
Mass Insight Education, The Turnaround Challenge
Investing:
What is possible in the CMSD Investment Schools?
People
• Selection of principal for 2013-14
• Selection of teachers and staff for 2013-14
• Investment Commitment letters to be signed by all staff
Time
• Extended instructional time
• Extended planning/preparation/collaboration time
• Restructured use of existing time
Money
• Pilot CMSD initiatives (student-weighted funding,
differentiated compensation)
• Increased budget autonomy to invest in positions,
programs, partners best suited to a specific school
Programs
• Intensive coaching and professional development to
support specific school needs and goals
• Intentional alignment of student and family supports
• External supports for programs and operations
Investment Schools Year 1: Focus on Readiness to Learn
Robert H. Jamison
Luis Munoz Marin
Mound
Kenneth Clement Boys
Leadership Academy
1. Safety, discipline & engagement
Students feel secure and inspired to learn.
2. Action against adversity
Schools directly address the challenges faced
by students living in poverty.
3. Close student-adult relationships
Students have positive and enduring
mentor/teacher relationships.
readiness to
LEARN
Investment Schools Year 1: Focus on Readiness to Teach
 Case
 Robinson G. Jones
 Walton
 Franklin D. Roosevelt
4. Shared responsibility for
achievement
Staff feel deep accountability and missionary
zeal for student achievement.
readiness to
TEACH
5. Personalization of instruction
Individualized teaching based on diagnostic
assessment and adjustable time on task.
6. Professional teaching culture
Continuous improvement through
collaboration and job-embedded learning.
Investment Schools Year 1: Focus on Readiness to Act
 Anton Grdina
 Collinwood HS
 Carl & Louis Stokes
 John Adams HS
 Lincoln-West HS
7. Resource authority
8. Resource ingenuity
School leaders can make mission-driven
decisions regarding people, time, money,
and programs.
Leaders are adept at securing additional
resources and leveraging partner
relationships.
readiness to
ACT
9. Agility in the face of turbulence
Leaders, teachers, and systems are flexible
and inventive responding to constant unrest.
CMSD Investment Schools = Positive Change
We will not do business as usual; this is unusual business.
We will not repeat old mistakes.
What SU CCESSFUL turnaround IS:
Recognition of the
challenge: Our kids
deserve better
Urgency to make
every minute a
learning minute
Working smarter,
not harder
Dramatic,
fundamental change
Supportive
operating conditions
Collaborative
community of
professional
educators
What school turnaround is NOT:
Settling for
incremental
improvement
Multiple programs
implemented
without
intentionality
Infrequent coaching
Requiring additional
improvement plans
“Every man for
himself”
Additional mandates
without support
What visible changes must we see in Investment Schools?
Building students’ Readiness to Learn:
 Clean, attractive, inviting classrooms and public spaces
Every adult in the school using consistent, positive language

to set the tone of high expectations for everyone
Curriculum and resources to support high-quality instruction for
English Language Learners and Special Education students
1. Safety, discipline & engagement
Students feel secure and inspired to learn.
Improved student and staff attendance and morale
Real-Time Coaching for teachers who struggle to manage
2. Action against adversity
Schools directly address the challenges faced
by students living in poverty.

classroom behavior and keep students engaged
Extra time for student advisory and structured supports from

3. Close student-adult relationships
Students have positive and enduring
mentor/teacher relationships.
caring adults: mentoring, tutoring, etc.
Proactive solutions to empower students and families
Cooperation and communication between educators, families,

and providers of other student supports
What visible changes must we see in Investment Schools?
Building educators’ Readiness to Teach:
 Extra time for teachers to collaborate, learn from one another, and
plan outstanding, relevant lessons
•Holding every adult accountable for the success of every student
•Integrated use of classroom technology to engage students
4. Shared responsibility for
achievement
Staff feel deep accountability and missionary
zeal for student achievement.
Targeted professional development and ongoing coaching on how to
use available data to meet individual students’ learning needs
Curriculum and resources to support high-quality instruction for
5. Personalization of instruction
Individualized teaching based on diagnostic
assessment and adjustable time on task.
6. Professional teaching culture
Continuous improvement through
collaboration and job-embedded learning.
English Language Learners and Special Education students
All-school training to deepen staff commitment to a culture of
learning, high expectations, and every student graduating from
high school prepared for college and career success
What visible changes must we see in Investment Schools?
Building school leaders’ Readiness to Act:
Allowing principals more budget flexibility to be responsive to the
needs of students in their school including ELLs and special needs students.
•Protecting schools from unnecessary bureaucracy so that leaders
can focus on the students and teachers in the school
Coaching Investment School principals in how to lead positive,
effective change processes
7. Resource authority
School leaders can make mission-driven
decisions regarding people, time, money,
and programs.
•Expanding school partnerships that have worked in other CMSD
schools (i.e., New Tech Network)
Increasing cooperation and communication between external
8. Resource ingenuity
Leaders are adept at securing additional
resources and leveraging partner
relationships.
9. Agility in the face of turbulence
Leaders, teachers, and systems are flexible
and inventive responding to constant unrest.
partners to keep every program focused on the needs and goals
of the school and its students
Why were some high need schools not selected this
year?
• This is a long-term commitment to improve all of
Cleveland’s underperforming schools.
• Additional schools will be selected as Investment
Schools for school years 2014-15 and 2015-16.
• Some struggling schools will utilize this year to plan
and prepare to enter Investment School status.
Investing in Our Children: CMSD’s Investment Schools
LEP MODIFICATION PLAN
MAY 2013 – AUGUST 2013


CMSD Internal Review Process of the
design and instructional service delivery
model for ELL’s is in progress.
Final recommendations to be aligned
with the CMSD Transformation Plan and
Portfolio of School Strategies.
CMSD ENROLLMENT
Average
Daily
School Year Student
Enrollme
nt
2012-2013
40,831
African American
Asian or
Hispani MultiPacific
c
Racial
Islander
White,
Limited
nonStudents with
English
Hispani Proficient Disabilities
c
68.17%
0.96%
20.13% 6.8%
7.83%
2.32%
22.2%
IMMIGRANT STUDENTS
From 45 Countries
2792
2778
LEP ENROLLMENT
LEP ENROLLMENT
LEP ENROLLMENT
2680
773
SY 2010-2011
SY 2011-2012
502
IMMIGRANT
STUDENTS
IMMIGRANT
STUDENTS
IMMIGRANT
STUDENTS
504
SY 2012-2013
Series1
Series2
Research Findings
Current research identified six major challenges for
improving the literacy of ELLs:







Lack of common criteria for identifying ELLs and tracking their
academic performance
Lack of appropriate assessments
Inadequate educator capacity for improving literacy in ELLs
Lack of appropriate and flexible program options
Inadequate use of research-based instructional practices
Lack of a strong and coherent research agenda about
adolescent ELL literacy
Report to the Carnegie Corporation of New York: Double the Work- Challenges and Solutions to Acquiring Language and Academic Literacy for Adolescent
English Language Learners, published by the Alliance for Excellent Education in 2007, authored by Deborah J. Short and Shannon Fitzsimmons.
Alternative Solutions

Newcomers and Immigrant students need specialized programs to
accelerate their learning of English, their acculturation to U.S. schooling
practices, and access basic content knowledge.

Research based recommended program features include:

Intensive courses to integrate students and fill gaps in educational
background.
Sheltered instruction or bilingual education coupled with content-based
ESL classes
Length of enrollment based on individual needs
Staff selection process to ensure highly-qualified staff
Flexible pathways for graduation and careers




CMSD International Newcomers
Academy Goals:






Accelerate English language acquisition in the four domains of
listening, speaking, reading, and writing
Develop academic content vocabulary and higher level thinking
skills
Deliver high-quality academic core content instruction
Promote the development of cross-cultural social and academic
skills students will need when entering district mainstream schools
Develop a strong interdisciplinary foundation for long-term
academic and socio-cultural success
Develops strong family and community links that will foster cultural
acclimation and positive family school and community
engagement
Program Objectives:








Students’ attainment of English as Second Language skills
based on State Standards within one to two school years
Achieve academic gains of a minimum of one grade level in
core academic content areas
Achieve Beginning and Intermediate levels in the Listening and
Speaking Domains on the OTELA
Provide a flexible instructional curriculum that responds to
students’ bilingual language and cultural needs
Increase cultural exposure through varied activities
Students will develop learning strategies and self-awareness
for achieving success
Provide students a comprehensive support system in
collaborations with internal and external providers to ensure
cultural and emotional development.
Provide opportunities to effectively acclimate parents and
families to the community and to it’s available resources
CMSD- Newcomer Definition
and Entrance Criteria
A
newcomer is a non English-speaking student who
scores at the beginning level on the English language
placement test and has been in the U.S. for no more
than one school year.
INTERNATIONAL NEWCOMERS ACADEMY STUDENT
REPORT BY GRADES
GRADE TOTAL
PRE-K
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TOTALS
13
33
29
22
24
26
29
24
16
27
34
24
20
8
329
STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS-NEWCOMERS
GENDER
FEMALE
52%
MALE
48%
CITIZEN STATUS
ENROLLMENT LANGUAGE
DATE
REFUGEE
ONE YEAR
SPANISH= 56%
ARABIC=10%
31%
90%
NEPALI=13%
IMMIGRANT
TWO YEARS
21% Other
Languages
56%
10%
Burmese
BORN IN PUERTO
Chinese
RICO
Dinka
English/Creole
44%
French
Japanese
Karen
Kirundi
STUDENT ENROLLMENT-NEWCOMERS
250
221
200
150
108
100
50
0
FIRST YEAR
RETURNING STUDENTS- SECOND YEAR
STUDENT BY LAU CODES SY 2012-2013
INTERNATIONAL NEWCOMERS ACADEMY
LAU CODES
LAU A- Prefunctional Level
LAU B- Beginning Level
LAU C- Intermediate Level
TOTALS
293
33
3
TOTAL
329
Staffing
• Administration
• TESOL
CERTIFIED TEACHERS
Pre-K• Kindergarten
• Gr 1-3• Gr. 4-5 • Gr. 6-8• Gr. 9-12• ESL Resource –
• Special Education• Electives•
• Guidance-
–
• Attendance Laison• Classified Paraprofessionals• Nurse
2
25
1
2
3
2
2
5
2
2
5
1
1
1
8
This is what we do
Instructional Design

Use of ESL research
based practices and
principles primarily
utilizing sheltered English
instructional methods
and materials.

Use of Sheltered English
instructional strategies
and SIOP in the teaching
of core content along
with native language
support.
In the Classroom
•
•
•
•
•
•
5, 40 min. periods of ESL daily
Daily session on Imagine Learning
software program
RIGOR English Reading ProgramGr, 5-12
Spotlight on English- Santillana Gr,
K-4
SIOP Methods used in all content
subjects
Marzano’s Teaching Basic and
Advanced Vocabulary
Resources
RIGOR
Spotlight On English
Imagine Learning
English in a Flash
Accelerated Reader
First in Math
Instructional Design
All
students (Pre-K -12) follow an elementary program master
schedule based on forty minutes instructional periods.
Students are also grouped into one of two ESL levels (A and B)
based on their English proficiency levels and assigned to selfcontained classes by grade bands
ESL Level A:
Students at pre-functional level in English language acquisition
and/or read in English at the pre-literate level
Students receive 5 periods of ESL/ELA, 1 period of math, and 1
period of an elective
ESL Level B:
Students with native language literacy skills and/or read in English
at the early literacy or above 3rd grade level
Students receive 4 periods of ESL/ELA, 1 period of math, 1 period
of an elective, 1 period of Sheltered English instruction integrating
science and social studies.
Instructional Design
Project
based learning and Global studies are integrated school
wide in the academic subjects to build on students’ prior
knowledge and experiences
Students move through the proficiency levels at varying rates
based on classroom performance, motivation, ongoing
assessments and teacher observations.
A balanced literacy program is provided during the ESL/ELA
instructional block. Use of direct and indirect instruction,
cooperative flexible grouping, learning centers, rich language and
student interaction activities to supports vocabulary development
Use of technology lab and resources to support and practice
reading, speaking and listening skills.
CHALLENGES
• NEW INCOMING STUDENTS DAILY
• TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS
• MEETING NEEDS OF SPECIAL EDUCATION STUDENTS
• GROWING PAINS
• STAFFING:
• RECRUITMENT/IDENTIFICATION OF QUALIFIED
• TESOL TRAINED TEACHERS
• CONTRACT ISSUES- TEACHERS ASSIGNMENTS
• INTERVIEWS OF NEW HIRES
• PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES
• EXIT CRITERIA:
• PARENT PUSH BACK -WANT STUDENTS TO
• REMAIN MORE THAN 2 YEARS IN SAME SCHOOL
Assessments
District and State standardized tests:
OTELA, OAA, OGT and CMSD Benchmark
QuaterlyTests
Resource Specific Assessments:
Imagine Learning and English in a Flash
ongoing tests, STAR Reading,
Accelerated Reader, First in Math skills
logs.
Authentic Assessments: Portfolios,
Video for reading fluency.


Video Recording
•
•
Provides a way for evaluating reading fluency,
pronunciation and intonation
Reading Fluency Rubric used for evaluation.
Exit Criteria

The decision to exit a student from the
Newcomer program follows a standardized
procedure
Teacher recommendations
Formal and informal observations
English-Language Development Observation Checklist,
Standardized test scores , OTELA & Benchmark tests
Student’s portfolio of class work
Parent Conference/Contract
Paths to Graduation for
Secondary Newcomer Academy Students
/Bilingual
Other Schools of
Newcomers Grades 6 - 8 Program Schools O Choice
Grades 6, 7, 8 R
Newcomers grades
9-12
Ninth Grade
Thomas Jefferson
Grade 9
Five year alternatives pathways for high school overage students.
Strong Partnerships with secondary institutions and Community
College to support student after high school completion
OR
Comprehensive High
Schools with support
Grades 10-12
OR Other CMSD
High Schools
Provides , sheltered
instruction in content
subjects and bilingual
tutorial support with
academic credit leading to
HS diploma.
Extended Leaning
opportunities in
Summer School and
after-school enrichment
sessions
Provides counseling and
linkage to targeted postsecondary and career +
technical programs for
students unable to
graduate by age 21.
Referral to Career
Technical Schools,
credit retrieval, GED
for 17-21 year olds
with low credits
Support Intervention Components

Student Transition Activities
•Support to schools, collaboration with staff, students, parents and
administrators.
•Discussion and end of year pre-preparation
activities or conferences
by all staff with parents and students.
•Students make visits to the receiving school and classrooms. Students
are transitioned into ESL/Bilingual classrooms at the designated home
school.
•Orientation activities provided by the receiving school to ensure that
the newcomer students are provided appropriate information to allow
them to access appropriate courses and make decisions about
postsecondary options.
Support Intervention Resources





Parent Engagement
Outreach and parent engagement activities will be
implemented to improve the whole family’s
successful integration to the new community and
culture. (Workshops, socials, community trips etc.)
Collaborations with community partners will be
established to support and address the financial,
educational and health needs of families.
Health screening and referrals to therapeutic
services for all students who need additional care.
Support to break cultural barriers to help parents
understand how schools function and provide them
with the information and assistance they need to
support their children’s education.
Support Intervention Resources

Multilingual Welcome Center services- (in the same
school location at Thomas Jefferson School)

Community Collaborations for student and family services

After school tutoring programs to support students'
academic achievement and increase interactions with
native English speakers

Summer enrichment school offerings in partnerships with
community partners
Professional & Committed Staff




Commitment to a school wide philosophy of research best
practices for English as a second language instruction and
academic outcomes for ELLs...
Implement collaborative professional learning community
standards focused on improved student learning .
Engage in common planning time (3 to 5 hours/week) to support
team collaborations, curriculum development and alignment of
curriculum based on student needs, and to monitor student
progress using data.
Participate on ongoing job-embedded professional development
on a monthly basis along with opportunities to evaluate student
growth and progress effectiveness. ( 50 hours of summer preservice & after-school)
SY 2010-2011
SY 2011-2012
OTELA - District
SY 2009-2010
SY 2012-2013
SCHOOL YEAR 2009-10
SCHOOL YEAR 2011-12
SCHOOL YEAR 2010-11
SCHOOL YEAR 2012-13
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LISTENING
GR. K
7%
SPEAKING
GR. K
13%
9%
9%
15%
24%
1
24%
2
3
4
1
2
3
26%
4
5
5
46%
28%
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LISTENING
GR. 1-2
0%
SPEAKING
GR. 1-2
9%
17%
11%
6%
9%
1
2
32%
1
19%
3
2
4
3
5
4
5
43%
55%
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LISTENING
GR. 3-5
15%
SPEAKING
GR. 3-5
11%
18%
18%
8%
1
1
2
3
4
2
11%
3
4
5
35%
22%
31%
31%
5
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LISTENING
GR. 6-8
SPEAKING
GR. 6-8
8%
18%
8%
15%
37%
8%
1
2
2
3
3
4
30%
4
5
5
25%
33%
17%
1
OHIO TEST OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE ACQUISITION (OTELA)
PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS BY PROFICIENCY LEVEL
LISTENING
GR. 9-12
SPEAKING
GR. 9-12
4%
14%
14%
25%
17%
10%
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
30%
33%
1
5
14%
36%
Proportional Change in Composite:
Year to Year Comparisons within Student
TOTALS
SCHOOLS
Loss
Buhrer
Clark
Joseph M. Gallagher
Lincoln West
Luis Muñoz Marín
Marion C. Seltzer
Max S. Hayes
Scranton
International Newcomers Academy
Gain
12.1%
20.6%
25.2%
22.7%
23.5%
18.7%
25.4%
15.3%
5.2%
47.6%
48.1%
33.3%
33.5%
35.0%
37.3%
30.5%
48.1%
50.6%
23.2%
21.6%
29.7%
40.5%
(2 YRS STUDENTS ONLY)
Non-Bilingual Sites
Walton
•Questions?
Contact Information
Natividad Pagan, Ex, Director
Multilingual Multicultural Education
[email protected]
(216) 574-8584
Rhonda A. Corr Saegert, Principal
International Newcomers Academy
[email protected]
(216) 404-5111
Margaret Berrios-Brown, Academic Coach
[email protected]
 (216) 224-1547
 The International Newcomers Academy
3145 West 46th Street, Cleveland, OH 44102
(216) 404-5098
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Academic Success for Immigrant Youth