Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Exercises
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ENTER
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Extension
I.
Oral work 
II. Quiz 
III.Writing
IV. Listening lab 
V. Supplementary reading
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
List
1. Group discussion
2. Sayings about faith
3. Debating
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
Please list at least three figures who
played important roles in history. And give
their main feats respectively.
What do you think make them
remembered by people?
Do you think faith is vital to one’s success?
If it is possible, please give some examples.
What qualities do you think people need
when they want to achieve success in their
career?
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The end of group discussion.
Brainstor
m in
groups.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
• Faith is like radar that sees through the fog.
~Corrie Ten Boom, Tramp for the Lord
• Reason is our soul's left hand, Faith her right.
~John Donne
• Faith is reason grown courageous.
~Sherwood Eddy
• Doubt is a pain too lonely to know that faith is his
twin brother.
~Kahlil Gibran
• Fear knocked at the door. Faith answered. And lo,
no one was there.
~Author Unknown
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
• If there was no faith there would be no living in
this world. We couldn't even eat hash with safety.
~Josh Billings
• Faith, to my mind, is a stiffening process, a sort of
mental starch.
~E.M. Forster
• Faith is spiritualized imagination.
~Henry Ward Beecher
• Faith is a passionate intuition.
~William Wordsworth
• To me faith means not worrying. ~John Dewey
• Faith is courage; it is creative while despair is
always destructive.
~David S. Muzzey
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
• Every tomorrow has two handles. We can take
hold of it by the handle of anxiety, or by the
handle of faith.
~Author Unknown
• Faith is the bird that sings when the dawn is still
dark.
~Rabindranath Tagore
• Faith is raising the sail of our little boat until it is
caught up in the soft winds above and picks up
speed, not from anything within itself, but from
the vast resources of the universe around us.
~W. Ralph Ward
• In faith there is enough light for those who want to
believe and enough shadows to blind those who
don't.
~Blaise Pascal
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
• Faith enables persons to be persons because it
lets God be God.
~Carter Lindberg
• Weave in faith and God will find the thread.
~Author Unknown
• A little faith will bring your soul to heaven, but a
lot of faith will bring heaven to your soul.
~Author Unknown
• Faith is believing in things when common sense
tells you not to.
~George Seaton
• Feed your faith and your fears will starve to death.
~Author Unknown
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The end of Sayings about faith.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Oral Work
I.
Topic for debating:
It is worthwhile to sacrifice one’s life
for one’s career.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz
II.
List
1. Quiz 1
2. Quiz 2
3. Quiz 3
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 1
II.
the entrance hall of a house
seedling
to remove; to get rid of
warder
a young plant
hallway
in the end
cell
a small room inside prison
where inmates live
enduring
lasting
eventually
the head of a prison
eliminate
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The end of Quiz 1.
Match the
items in the
two columns.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
1. There’s little chance that mankind would __ a
nuclear war.
a. retain
c. maintain
b. endure
d. survive
2. In the past, most foresters have been men,
but today, the number of women __ this field is
climbing.
a. engaging
b. devoting
c. registering
d. pursuing
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d
d
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
3. In previous times, when fresh meat was in
short ______, pigeons were kept by many
households as a source of food.
a. store
c. reserve
b. provision
d. supply
4. ____ she wondered if she had made a
mistake.
a. Not until long afterwards that
b. Not long until afterwards
c. It was not until long afterwards that
d. It was long afterwards until

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d
c
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
5. Humidity is so intense in some parts of the
tropics that Europeans find they are unable to __ it.
a. maintain
c. endure
b. persist
d. sustain
c
6. She once again went through her composition
carefully to __ all spelling mistakes from it.
a. withdraw
b. diminish
c. abandon
d. eliminate
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d
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
7. Those people __ a general understanding of
the present situation.
a. lack of
b. are lacking of
c. lack
d. are in lack
8. Since last year, the crime rate in Chicago has
sharply __.
a. declined
b. lessened
c. descended
d. slipped
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c
a
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
9. Crisis would be the right term to describe the
__ in many animal species.
a. minimization
c. descent
b. restriction
d. decline
10. A disagreement about boundaries is ___ the
heart of the two country’s dispute.
a. at
b. of
c. in
d. by
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d a
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
11. ____heart—things can only get better.
a. Have
b. Pluck
c. Take
d. Lose
12. The teachers said his work was _____but
there was still room for improvement.
a. satisfied
b. satisfactory
c. grateful
d. gratified
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c
b
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
13. At midnight, he drove through streets ____of
traffic.
a. empty
b. lacking
c. lack
d. crowded
14. His time at university
____period of her life.
a. eventual
b. enduring
c. eventually
d. eventful
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was
the
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most
a
d
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
15. He was cut ______ in his prime by cancer.
a. off b. down c. out d. up
16. My boss asked me to answer the phone,
to take all messages, and ______some
letters.
a. to type
b. typing
c. type
d. typewrite
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b
a
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
17. In the future, the discovery which will
most change the lives of people, most affect the
health of the world, and ______the drug
industry is the cure for the common cold.
a. most change
b. most changing
c. with most change on
d. most change of
18. The role of the party system in American
politics has always been ______.
A. not dividing but a union
b. not to divide but to unite
c. a unity instead of dividing
d. unifying instead of a division
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a
b
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 2
II.
19. “Did you see any foreigner present at the
party?”
“He was the only foreigner ______I saw at the
party.”
a. whom
b. that
c. who
d. which
20. “What of Micheal?”
“After tonight, he would never be the same
man ______he was before.”
a. what
b. who
c. as
d. but
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The end of Quiz 2.
b
c
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Quiz 3
II.
1.
2.
He did not offer any constructive
_________criticism—
just complained he did not like it.
(construct)
removal
He consented to the _______ of the flags.
(remove)
3.
We found the answer by a process of
elimination
__________.
(eliminate)
4.
He was posing as a wealthy gambler who
legalize casinos in
wanted lawmakers to _______
Arizona. (legal)
organizational
We were impressed by her ___________
5.
ability. (organize)
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The end of Quiz.
Fill out the
blanks with
the proper
form of the
given words.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Writing
III.
Describe what you have
learnt from text about
Mandela’s life in prison which
is helpful to you in about 150
words.
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The end of Writing.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Listening Lab
IV.
Committee has decided to
The Norwegian Nobel _________
award the Nobel Peace Prize for 1993 to Nelson
R. Mandela and Frederik Willem de Klerk for
their work for the _________
termination of the
peaceful
__________
regime, and for laying the
apartheid
foundations for a new democratic South Africa.
From their different points of ________,
departure
Mandela and de Klerk have reached agreement
on the principles for a transition to a new
political _______
based on the tenet of one
order
man-one vote. By looking ahead to South African
reconciliation instead of back at the deep
_______
wounds of the past, they have shown personal
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Fill out the
blanks while
you are
listening.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Listening Lab
IV.
integrity and great political ________.
courage
Ethnic disparities cause the ________
bitterest conflicts.
South Africa has been the symbol of raciallyconditioned suppression
_________. Mandela's and de
Klerk's constructive policy of peace and
reconciliation also points the way to the peaceful
________
of similar deep-rooted conflicts
resolution
elsewhere in the world.
The previous Nobel Laureates Albert Lutuli and
Desmond Tutu made important _________
contributions to
progress towards racial equality in South Africa.
Mandela and de Klerk have taken the process a
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
Listening Lab
IV.
major ____
step further. The Nobel Peace Prize for
1993 is awarded in _________
recognition of their efforts
and as a pledge of support for the forces of good,
in the hope that the ______
advance towards equality
democracy will reach its goal in the very near
and ________
future.
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The end of Listening Lab.
Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
Long Walk to Freedom (excerpt 1)
We were driven to the old jail, an isolated
stone building, where we were ordered to strip
while standing outside. One of the ritual
indignities of prison life is that when you are
transferred from one prison to another, the first
thing that happens is that you change from the
garb of the old prison to that of the new. When
we were undressed, we were thrown the plain
khaki uniforms of Robben Island.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
Apartheid's regulations extended even to
clothing. All of us, except Kathy, received short
trousers, an insubstantial jersey, and a canvas
jacket. Kathy, the one Indian among us, was
given long trousers. Normally Africans would
receive sandals made from car tires, but in this
instance we were given shoes. Kathy, alone,
received socks. Short trousers for Africans were
meant to remind us that we were “boys”. I put
on the short trousers that day, but I vowed that
I would not put up with them for long.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
The warders pointed with their guns where they
wanted us to go, and barked their orders in
simple one-word commands: "Move!" "Silence!"
"Halt!" They did not threaten us in the
swaggering way that I recalled from my
previous stay, and betrayed no emotion.
The old jail was only temporary quarters for us.
The authorities were in the process of finishing
an
entirely
separate
maximum-security
structure for political prisoners. While there, we
were not permitted to go outside or have any
contact with other prisoners.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
That first week we began the work that would
occupy us for the next few months. Each
morning, a load of stones about the size of
volleyballs was dumped by the entrance to the
courtyard. Using wheelbarrows, we moved the
stones to the center of the yard. We were given
either four-pound hammers or fourteen-pound
hammers for the larger stones. Our job was to
crush the stones into gravel. We were divided
into four rows, about a yard-and-a-half apart,
and sat cross-legged on the ground. We were
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
each given a thick rubber ring, made from tires,
in which to place the stones. The ring was
meant to catch flying chips of stone, but hardly
ever did so. We wore makeshift wire masks to
protect our eyes.
Warders walked among us to enforce the
silence. During those first few weeks, warders
from other sections and even other prisons
came to stare at us as if we were a collection of
rare caged animals. The work was tedious and
difficult; it was not strenuous enough to keep us
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
warm but it was demanding enough to make all
our muscles ache.
June and July were the bleakest months on
Robben Island. Winter was in the air, and the
rains were just beginning. It never seemed to
go above forty degrees Fahrenheit. Even in the
sun, I shivered in my light khaki shirt. It was
then that I first understood the cliche of feeling
the cold in one's bones. At noon we would break
for lunch. That first week all we were given was
soup, which stank horribly. In
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V.
Supplementary Reading
the afternoon, we were permitted to exercise
for half an hour under strict supervision. We
walked briskly around the courtyard in single
file.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
Long Walk to Freedom (excerpt 2)
Visits and letters were restricted to "first
degree" relatives. This was a restriction we
not only found irksome but racist. The African
sense of immediate family is far different from
that of the European or Westerner. Our family
structures are larger and more inclusive;
anyone who claims descent from a common
ancestor is deemed part of the same family.
In prison, the only thing worse than bad news
about one's family is no news at all. It is
always harder to cope with the disasters and
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
tragedies one imagines than with the reality,
however grim or disagreeable. A letter with ill
tidings was always preferable to no letter at
all.
But even this miserable restriction was abused
by the authorities. The anticipation of mail
was overwhelming. Mail call took place once a
month, and sometimes six months would go
by without a letter. To be allowed one letter in
six months and then not to receive it is a great
blow. One wonders: What has happened to my
wife and children, to my mother and my
sisters? When I did not receive a letter I felt
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
as dry and barren as the Great Karroo desert.
Often the authorities would withhold mail out
of spite. I can remember warders saying,
"Mandela, we have received a letter for you,
but we cannot give it to you." No explanation
of why, or who the letter was from. It required
all my self-discipline not to explode at such
times. Afterward, I would protest through the
proper channels, and sometimes get it.
When letters did arrive, they were cherished.
A letter was like the summer rain that could
make even the desert bloom. When I was
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
handed a letter by the authorities, I would not
rush forward and grab it as I felt like doing,
but take it in a leisurely manner. Though I
yearned to tear it open and read it on the spot,
I would not give the authorities the
satisfaction of seeing my eagerness, and I
would return slowly to my cell as though I had
many things to occupy me before opening a
letter from my family.
During the first few months, I received one
letter from Winnie, but it was so heavily
censored that not much more than the
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
the salutation was left. The island's censors
would black out the offending passages in ink,
but they later changed this when they realized
we could wash away the ink and see what was
underneath. They began to use razors to slice
out whole paragraphs. Since most letters were
written on both sides of a single piece of
paper, the material on the other side would
also be excised. They seemed to relish
delivering letters in tatters. The censorship
delayed the delivery of mail because warders,
some of whom were not proficient in English,
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
might take as long as a month to censor a
letter. The letters we wrote were censored as
well; they were often as cut up as the letters
we received.
At the end of August, after I had been on the
island less than three months, I was informed
by the authorities that I would have a visitor
the following day. They would not tell me who
it was. Walter was informed that he, too,
would have a visitor, and I suspected, I hoped,
I wished--I believed that it would be a visit
from Winnie and Albertina.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
Walter and I were called to the visitors' office
in the late morning and took seats at the far
end of the room. I waited with some anxiety,
and suddenly, filling out the glass on the other
side of the window was Winnie's lovely face.
Winnie always dressed up for prison visits,
and tried to wear something new and elegant.
It was tremendously frustrating not to be able
to touch my wife, to speak tenderly to her, to
have a private moment together. We had to
conduct our relationship at a distance under
the eyes of people we despised.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
I could see immediately that Winnie was
under tremendous strain. Seeing me in such
circumstances must have been trying. Just
getting to the island itself was difficult, and
added to that were the harsh rituals of the
prison, the undoubted indignities of the
warders, and the impersonality of the contact.
Winnie, I later discovered, had recently
received a second banning order and had been
terminated from her job at the Child Welfare
Office as a result. Her office was searched by
the police shortly before she was fired. The
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
authorities were convinced that Winnie was in
secret communication with me. Winnie loved
her job as a social worker. It was the handson end of the struggle: placing babies with
adoptive parents, finding work for the
unemployed and medical help for the
uninsured. The banning and harassment of my
wife greatly troubled me: I could not look
after her and the children, and the state was
making it difficult for her to look after herself.
My powerlessness gnawed at me.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
Our conversation was awkward at first, and
was not made easier by the presence of two
warders standing directly behind her and
three behind me. Their role was not only to
monitor but to intimidate. Regulations dictated
that conversation had to be in either English
or
Afrikaans—African
languages
were
forbidden and could involve family matters
only. Any line of talk that departed from the
family and verged on the political might mean
the abrupt termination of the visit. If one
mentioned a name unfamiliar to the warders,
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
they would interrupt the conversation, and ask
who the person was and the nature of the
relationship. This happened often, as the
warders were generally unfamiliar with the
variety and nature of African names. It was
frustrating to spend precious minutes of one's
visit explaining to a warder the different
branches of one's family tree. But their
ignorance also worked in our favor: it allowed
us to invent code names for people we wanted
to talk about and pretend that we were
referring to family members.
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
That first visit was important, for I knew that
Winnie was anxious about my health: she had
heard stories that we were being physically
abused. I quickly informed her that I was fine
and she could see that I was fit, though a bit
thinner than before. She, too, was thinner,
something I always attributed to stress. After
a visit in which Winnie's face looked drawn or
tense, I would urge her to put on a bit of
weight. She was always dieting, and I was
always telling her not to. I inquired one by one
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
about all the children, about my mother and
sisters, and Winnie's own family.
Suddenly, I heard the warder behind me say,
"Time up! Time up!" I turned and looked at
him with incredulity. It was impossible that
half an hour had passed. But, in fact, he was
right; visits always seemed to go by in the
blink of an eye. For all the years that I was in
prison, I never failed to be surprised when the
warder called, "Time up!" Winnie and I were
both hustled from our chairs and we waved a
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Lesson 7 - Mandela's Garden
V. Supplementary Reading
quick farewell. I always felt like lingering after
Winnie left, just to retain the sense of her
presence, but I would not let the warders see
such emotion. As I walked back to the cell, I
reviewed in my head what we had talked
about. Over the next days, weeks, and
months, I would return to that one visit again
and again. I knew I would not be able to see
my wife again for at least six months. As it
turned out, Winnie was not able to visit me for
another two years.
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