Special Education Framework
Focus on the IEP Writing Process
Our accountability system has two
overarching objectives
Growth for all students, every year
and
Faster growth for those students who are furthest
behind
2
Beliefs
 All students can learn and demonstrate growth (ALL means ALL)
 Specialized instruction (IDEA, ELL and Title) is a continuum of services (not
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a place)
Relationships and collaboration (tearing down silos of education) so
stakeholders will focus on decisions that are best for ALL students
Responsibility and accountability in teaching and supporting ALL students
Strong leadership at all levels to ensure that students are supported in the
least restrictive environment
High quality professional learning empowers all stakeholders and builds
capacity for the success of ALL students
Key Goals of Special Populations
Improving Student Outcomes
 Prevention
 Intervention
 Achievement
 Outcomes
Managing Performance
 Effective employees at every level of the organization with a focus on
improving student outcomes.
5
Students with Disabilities by Environment
In General Ed 80%
or more of the day
In General Ed 40%70% of the day
In General Ed <40%
of the day
Number of Students Within Each
Eligibility Category
OHI
SLD
SLI
Achievement Data
Policy Changes & Practices that will Impact the IEP
 Identifying students with a Specific Learning Disability
• As of July 1, 2014, RTI² will be the framework used by teams to identify a
student with a Specific Learning Disability.
 Evaluation timeline changes
• As of January 29, 2014 TN changed to a 60 calendar day evaluation timeline
which aligns with federal guidelines. A program will be implemented within 30
calendar days from eligibility determination.
Policy Changes & Practices that will Impact the IEP
 Elimination of short term objectives
• As of March 31, 2014, TN will no longer have the requirement of
benchmarks or short term objectives in IEPs, except for the students
who participate in the alternate assessment
– Progress monitoring tools will chart progress towards goals
– Students receiving intervention through special education will be progress
monitored in their specific area of deficit.
– Communication regarding progress through regular progress reports
– Academic Progress monitoring data will be shared with parents as frequently
as non-disabled peers.
Special Education Framework:
Moving from Standards Based IEPs to
Instructionally Appropriate IEPs
 Tennessee Department of Education developed an IEP task force
• A Multidisciplinary team (43) from across the state
• Developed Special Education Framework Manual
– 1st draft completed Feb 28, 2014
– Second draft completed March 28, 2014
– Will work from a draft for summer of 2014
• Developed Implementation guide
– Draft completed March 28, 2014
– Will work from draft for Summer of 2014
Special Education Framework: Manual Overview
 Component 1: General Special Education Information
 Component 2: Evaluations and Eligibility
 Component 3: Narratives
 Component 4: Present Levels of Educational Performance
(PLEP)
 Component 5: Measurable Annual Goals (MAGs)
 Component 6: Special Education Interventions
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Special Education Framework: Manual Overview
 Component 7: Progress Monitoring
 Component 8: Core Instruction for Students with a Disability
 Component 9: Post-Secondary Transition Services
 Component 10: Accommodations
 Component 11: Delivery of Special Education Intervention and
Services
 Component 12: Behavior, Assessment and Policy
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On a Continuum, Specialized Education is
the Most Intensive Intervention
Core Instruction Plus Sp.Ed
Intervention (More Intensive than
general education interventions)
Core Instruction Plus Tier III (45-60
minutes daily)
Core Instruction Plus Tier II (30
minutes daily)
There must be a link between a Student’s Needs and
the Interventions and Supports they Receive
Disability
Associated
Deficits
Interventions
and Supports
15
Evaluations and Eligibility
16
Disability Categories
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Autism
Deaf-Blindness
Deaf
Developmental Delay
Emotional Disturbance
Functional Delay*
Hearing Impairment
Intellectual Disability
Intellectually Gifted*
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Multiple Disabilities
Orthopedic Impairment
Other Health Impaired
Specific Learning
Disability
Speech Impaired
Language Impaired
Traumatic Brain
Disorder
Visual Impairment
IDEA vs. DSM-V
IDEA
DSM-V
 Evaluations are conducted to
 Evaluations conducted for the
determine eligibility for special
education and related services
 Develop educational plan to meet
individual student’s needs
 Child must demonstrate one of
disabilities defined in regulations
 Disability must adversely impact
education
purpose of differential diagnosis
 Medical model
 Third party reimbursement
 Treatment planning
Two pronged approach
Eligibility
criteria
Adverse
Impact
Eligibility
Specific Learning Disabilities
 “Specific Learning Disability” The term Specific Learning Disability
means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological
processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or
written, which may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen,
think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations, and
that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. Such term
includes conditions such as perceptual disabilities (e.g., visual
processing), brain injury that is not caused by an external physical
force, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental
aphasia.
Specific Learning Disabilities
Discrepancy
 IQ= ability
 Achievement
 Is there a significant discrepancy
between actual and predicted
achievement?
Response to Instruction and
Intervention (RTI²)
 Underachievement
 Lack of Response
• Student Rate of Improvement
(ROI)
• Gap Analysis
 Exclusionary Factors
Rate of Improvement & Progress Monitoring
 Progress Monitoring- Progress monitoring is used to assess
students’ academic performance, to quantify a student rate of
improvement or responsiveness to instruction, and to evaluate the
effectiveness of instruction. Progress monitoring can be
implemented with individual students or an entire class.
 Rate of Improvement (ROI)- The expected rate of improvement
on progress monitoring assessments is the number of units of
measure (e.g., words read correctly [wrc], correct responses,
correct digits) a child has made per week since the beginning of the
intervention. To discover this rate, teachers should divide the total
number of units gained by the number of weeks that have elapsed.
The ROI is compared to the improvement of a typical peer to
determine adequate progress.
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SLD Definition as of July 1, 2014
SLD: Associated Deficits
 Academics
• Specific area of deficit:
– Basic Reading Skills
– Reading Fluency
– Reading Comprehension
– Written Expression
– Mathematics Calculation
– Mathematics Problem Solving
Areas of Deficit: Reading
Basic Reading
Phonological Awareness
Phonics
Reading Fluency
Fluency
Reading Comprehension
Text Comprehension
Vocabulary
Areas of Deficit: Math
Math Calculation
Basic Facts
Complex Computation
Decimals, fractions, etc.
Math Problem Solving
Numbers and
operations
Base ten
Footer
Place Value
Geometry,
algebra, etc.
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Instructionally Appropriate IEPs
27
There must be a link between a Student’s Needs and
the Interventions and Supports they Receive
Disability
Associated
Deficits
Interventions
and Supports
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Core Instruction and Transition
Accommodation
Special Education
Intervention
Measurable
Annual Goal
(MAG)
Core
Instruction
Progress Monitoring
(Data)
Narratives: Strengths,
Concerns, Adverse
Impact
Transition
Present Levels of
Educational Performance
(PLEP)
29
Core Instruction and Transition
 ALL students are provided instruction based on CCSS
 The most intensive interventions (special education), are in addition
to core instruction-not a replacement
 Intervention
• Based on individual area of need
• Content/Skill specific
• Does not necessarily include all content areas or skills
 Transition
• Begins in kindergarten
• Focuses on career and college readiness
• Uses current and previous data to inform and guide Transition planning
Common Core State Standards:
Application to Students with Disabilities
 Students with disabilities are a heterogeneous group with one
common characteristic:
• the presence of disabling conditions that significantly hinder their
abilities to benefit from general education
 Participate with success:
• Instructional Supports
• Instructional Accommodations
• Assistive technology devices and supports
“Least Dangerous Assumption”
 States that in the absence of absolute evidence, it is essential to
make the assumption that, if proven to be false, would be least
dangerous to the individual.
 Therefore, the IEP teams should operate from the criterion of least
dangerous assumption by considering the least restrictive setting,
general education, first, for all students, regardless of disability,
before considering more restrictive settings.
 Evidence and data collected should be discussed before making the
determination that a student requires a more restrictive setting at
each IEP meeting (Rossetti & Tashie, 2013).
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Specially Designed Instruction
Universal Design for Learning
 Does not mean working at a lower level; nor does it weaken the
curriculum or change the standard
 Is not the same as an accommodation
 Is specific to skills deficits, not a particular subject or content area
 Focus on the importance of:
• Multiple means of representation
• Multiple means of action and expression
• Multiple means of engagement
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www.cast.org
www.udlcenter.org
https://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/hiat/udl/UDL_intro.pdf
http://www.gpb.org/education/common-core/udl-part-1
http://www.gpb.org/education/common-core/udl-part-2
Examples of UDL
Deriving UDL Solutions
Model Template
Grade: 3
Teacher: Mrs. G.
Subject: Science
Goal: Research and present information on a flower.
Materials & Methods
Standard: 6.23—Plants lifecycle
Potential Barriers/
Missed Opportunities
UDL Solutions
Printed textbook
Kevin—Difficulty seeing small text
Bill—Doesn’t tap his graphics skills
Brian—Difficulty decoding/understanding word
meaning
Electronic text with text-to-speech to read aloud
CD-ROM or online encyclopedia; Web page with collections of images
Spanish CD-ROM on flowers; link to Spanish Web site
Lecture/whole class
presentation
Jose—Difficulty comprehending meaning
Helen—Distracted, may miss info
Kiwa—Distracted, may miss info
Provide Spanish/English key terms translations with text-to-speech
Provide Inspiration concept map of key ideas; eText outline with text to speech
that students can access
Library research
Brian—May have trouble keeping track.
Kiwa—May not be able to abstract the project’s
important content.
Partially filled-in outlines; Web page with attached resources; collection of online
resources, online or CD-ROM encyclopedia, linked to Inspiration outline of key
project parts
Create written report
Sarita—Mechanics-based difficulty expressing
her ideas
Jake—Format doesn’t tap artistic talent
Word processor with spell check; talking word processor
Flower drawing
Phillip—Drawing will be physically difficult.
Word processing; selection of graphics to use in report
Oral report on flower
Jorge—Format doesn’t tap musical talent
Brian—May be intimidated
Provide option of live or recorded music as part of demonstration
Pair Brian with James, who can support him while working
Independent project
James—Context won’t draw on his leadership
and collaboration skills.
Helen—Could have difficulty working alone.
Elizabeth—Deep knowledge of plants
Encourage James to support other students as they work
Graphics program—Kid Pix
Be sure to find aspect of project of particular interest to Helen and check in
frequently. Support presentation with notes
Pair Elizabeth with Jose to share her knowledge and enthusiasm
http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/tools/udlsolutionstemplate.cfm
34
ALL Students Receive High Quality Core Instruction
Special Education is Not a Place!
 Indicator 5 of the Annual Performance Report
• Children with IEPs are served inside the regular classroom 80% or more
of the day to the extent possible
• Should have evidence of LRE
– Data used to support the team decision
 Continuum of Services
• General Education teachers are the content experts
• Interventions are in addition to the 80% core instruction
• Intervention must match the specific area(s) of deficit
 Neither IDEA nor the Department of Education define inclusion and
instead refer to the requirement of school districts to place students
in the least restrictive environment
Tier I Worksheets
 Tool for collaboration
 Have to know the specific deficit area in order to appropriately
design instruction
 To assist in pre-planning for the student
 Example posted to conference site
• See example Tier 1 skill worksheet in packet
Present Levels of Educational Performance
(PLEP)
Accommodation
Special Education
Intervention
Measurable
Annual
Goal(MAG)
Core
Instruction
Progress
Monitoring (Data)
Narratives:
Strengths, Concerns,
Adverse Impact
Transition
Present Levels of
Educational
Performance
(PLEP)
37
Present Levels of Educational Performance
(PLEP)
 Describes the unique needs of the student that the IEP will address
•
•
•
•
Identifies the student’s level of performance using current data
Identifies the students area(s) of strength
Identifies area of exceptionality (deficit)
Written in positive terms
 Describes current academic and functional performance
Without proper PLEPs, the IEP team cannot develop appropriate
goals, accommodations, or select an appropriate program for the
student.
The foundation of the IEP
6 Steps to Writing a Sound PLEP
1. Bring current data to the IEP meeting
2. Be very specific and make sure it is an accurate reflection.
•
Not how a student functions on a particular day, but consistently
(show a pattern)
3. Review current test scores, progress monitoring, and evaluation
results prior to the meeting
•
Ensure understanding of the student’s specific needs and current
functioning levels
4. Write in positive terms
5. Describe the impact of deficit area on mastery of standard(s)
6. Use the “stranger test” to assess PLEP
•
Another district/teacher should be able to begin instruction
immediately with the details in the IEP
PLEP Summary
 Provides the informational basis for generating goals, supports,
accommodations, and services that are specifically designed to meet
the student’s individual needs
 Align the student’s PLEP information with the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Measurable Annual goals
Supplementary aids/services/supports
Transition needs
Interventions
Accommodations
Identifies the student’s instructional needs that
may be written as goals
Ex. PLEP-Associated Deficit in Reading
PLEP
 May be entered separately or May be entered under area of deficit (Basic Reading Skills) and all
assessment in that specific area may be entered together.
Present Levels of Educational Performance
Test of Silent Word Reading Fluency (TOSWRF)
Area Assessed: Academics- Reading Fluency
Subtest: Reading Fluency
In looking at Susan’s protocol, it appears that she worked very slowly. She managed to divide 45
words on the form, but made 10 errors. Her descriptive rating indicated that she fell within the below
average range.
Reading Fluency: Given a 1 minute grade level passage, Susan read 25 words correctly with 11
errors. This is significantly below the 10th percentile according to winter norms. Susan’s current
reading fluency difficulties impacts her mastery of reading standards and access and participation in
content instruction that requires reading.
Date Administered: 01/30/2014
* EXCEPTIONAL YES/NO (REQUIRED): Yes
Age Equiv.: 70
Grade Equiv.: 2.0
Percentile Rank: 13
Std. Score: 83
41
PLEP-Associated Deficit in Reading
Subtest: Basic Reading
Letter Sound Fluency: Given a 1 minute letter sound fluency assessment,
Susan accurately sounded 42 letters. This represents the 45th percentile.
Word Identification Fluency: Given a 1 minute grade level passage, Susan
read 25 words correctly with 11 errors. This is significantly below the 10th
percentile according to winter norms. Susan’s current reading fluency
difficulties impacts her mastery of reading standards and access and
participation in content instruction that requires reading.
Date Administered: 01/30/2014
* EXCEPTIONAL YES/NO (REQUIRED): Yes
42
Example Present Levels of Educational Performance
(PLEP)
 After you view PLEPS consider these questions:
• Do you know in which area(s) the student is exceptional?
•
•
•
•
Marked Yes
Do you know in which area(s) the student requires intervention?
Do you know where to begin instruction/intervention?
Do you know how the area of exceptionality is aligned to the
standards?
Do you know how the area of deficit will impact the student on
the Mastery of standards?
– Ex. Reading fluency deficit will impact student throughout core instruction in
all content areas.
– Ex. Math Calculation deficit will impact student in content area(s) related to
math.
Aligning exceptional PLEP (deficit area) with core
instruction (standards)
Alignment of core instruction with area of deficit-Susan
significantly struggles in the area of pre-reading and reading skills.
Susan’s reading deficits will impact her mastery of standards,
specifically standards that include reading and reading
comprehension.
Other Examples:
 Reading fluency deficit will impact student throughout core
instruction in all content areas.
 Ex. Math Calculation deficit will impact student in content area(s)
related to math.
44
Measurable Annual Goal
Progress Monitoring
(Data)
Accommodation
Special Education Intervention
Measurable
Annual Goal
(MAG)
Core
Instruction
Transition
Narratives: Strengths,
Concerns, Adverse
Impact
Present Levels of
Educational Performance
(PLEP)
45
Measurable Annual Goal
Present Level of
Educational
Performance
(PLEP)
MAG is linked to Present Levels of Educational Performance
Measurable Annual
Goal
(MAG)
46
MAG Summary
Individual needs are the basis for a student’s goal
Directly linked to the exceptional area(s) of the PLEP
Measurable and very specific
Numbers must be included in the goal
• Rate of improvement may be used to set academic goals
 Must meet the student’s needs that result from the disability to
enable the student to be involved and make progress in the general
curriculum
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47
Ask Yourself?
 “What prerequisite skills/knowledge does the student need to close
the gap between his/her present levels of academic achievement
and the grade-level standards?” www.pattan.net
 “What skills are required to demonstrate proficiency on assessed
state indicators? What are the prerequisite skills required for
mastery?” http://www.ksde.org
48
www.pattan.net
http://www.ksde.org
Measurable Annual Goal (MAG) Template:
 Given_______(condition/materials/setting/accommodation),
_______(student name) will _______(do what measurable/
observable skill/behavior in functional terms), _____(to what
extent/how well to determine mastery), ________(# of
times/frequency/how consistently), by ________(how often)
evaluated/determined by _____(measure)
www.pattan.net
http://www.ksde.org
50
Goal setting with CBM data
 Step One: Determine Typical Rate of Improvement (ROI)
(_____________
Spring benchmark
expectation
-
_____________)
Fall benchmark
expectation
/
______36_______
Number of weeks
=
___________
Typical ROI (slope)
51
Let’s Practice!
Measure
Words Read Correct (WRC)
Fall Benchmark Expectation
60 WRC
Spring Benchmark Expectation
100 WRC
52
Goal setting with CBM data
 Step One: Determine Typical Rate of Improvement (ROI)
(___100______
Spring benchmark
expectation
-
_____60______)
Fall benchmark
expectation
/
______36_______
Number of weeks
=
___1.11______
Typical ROI (slope)
53
Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Two: Determine Goal Rate of Improvement (ROI)
_________
x
_____2_____
=
Typical ROI
_____________
Aggressive ROI
OR
___________
Typical ROI
x
______1.5_______
=
_____________
Reasonable ROI
54
Let’s Practice!
 Step Two: Determine Goal Rate of Improvement (ROI)
___1.11______
x
_____2_____
=
Typical ROI
____2.22_________
Aggressive ROI
OR
____1.11_______
Typical ROI
x
______1.5_______
=
____1.67_________
Reasonable ROI
55
Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Three: Calculate Student Goal
_________
Initial Score
+
__________
(Goal ROI) X (# of weeks)
=
_____________
Goal Score
56
Let’s Practice
Student’s initial score
20
Goal ROI
1.67
Number of weeks
36
57
Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Three: Calculate Student Goal
___20______
Initial Score
+
__60.12________
(Goal ROI) X (# of weeks)
=
_____80.12________
Goal Score
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Goal Statement
 Given a 2nd grade reading passage, Joanne will accurately read 80 words
correct on three consecutive data days using a weekly reading curriculum
based measure.
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Goals Are:
Goals Are Not:
Specific, measurable skills
General concepts and ideas
Individualized to the student’s
needs
Grade level
Related to an individual
student’s deficits
Standards
Directly related to that
individual student’s PLEP
Related to core instruction
tutoring
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Example Goals
Reading
 Given a curriculum based measure (at student instructional level after 1
year), Jennifer will read 94 words per minute with 95% accuracy for 5
consecutive trials on a 1 minute reading probe that will be completed 1
x per week.
Math Calculation
 Given multiplication problems with 3-digit numbers and graph paper,
Jack will follow the steps of computation in order to compute and
answer the problems with 80% accuracy on 3 consecutive assessments
within 1 month.
Basic Word-decoding
 Given a 1st grade curriculum based measure, without prompting, Frank
will decode consonant-vowel-consonant-e words with 90% accuracy for
4 consecutive opportunities on a 1 minute probe that will be completed
1x per week.
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Example MAGs
Behavior
 During unstructured tasks, Alison will remain within her desk work area,
defined by tape and furniture with no more than 1 prompt for 80% of
the activities within the school week as measured by a systematic
observation tool.
Social/Emotional
 Given small group activities, Henry will participate as defined by sitting
with his group and answering 2 questions on topic 80% of the
opportunities given within a 2 week period.
Adaptive
 At lunch, Marcus will open food containers including plastic tubes, bags
and paper wrappers with no assistance 90% of opportunities given
within a month time frame.
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Questions to Consider: Measurable Annual Goals
 When you review Measurable Annual Goals, ask:
• Are they measurable?
• Are they observable?
• Are they reasonable?
• Do they include criteria for mastery?
Ask:
 What skills does the student require to master the content of the
curriculum?
Rather Than:
 What curriculum content does the student need to master?
Measurable Annual Goal
vs. Short Term Objectives
Measurable Annual Goal
Short term objectives
 Very specific, no longer broad
 Includes criteria for mastery
 Instead progress monitor to show
within the goal
 May have more measurable
annual goals if distinctly different
skills
progress toward the MAG.
 If need short term objective you
can still use them.
 Required for students on alternate
assessment
Short Term Objective Requirements
Required for students with significant cognitive disabilities assessed on
an alternate assessment for accountability
Short-term Objectives Are:
Short-term Objectives Are Not:
Skills that need to be directly taught
Accommodations that are provided within the
classroom
Student behaviors that demonstrate
understanding and application of skills
Interventions or programs of curriculum
Separate skills required to meet the goal
Stair step approximations towards the goal
Skills and behaviors that a student must master
to achieve independence
Isolated skills to access small group instruction
65
Special Education Intervention
Progress Monitoring
(Data)
Accommodations
Special Education
Intervention
MAGs
Core
Instruction
Transition
Narratives: Strengths,
Concerns, Adverse
Impact
Present Levels of
Educational Performance
(PLEP)
66
So in what area do we intervene?
PLEP:
Current data
Present Level of Performance (PLEP)
Measurable Annual Goal (MAG)
Exceptional
PLEP requires a
MAG
MAG drives
specific
intervention
What is your districts current focus?
Current Measurable Annual Goal
focus
Current Intervention Focus
 What do Measurable Annual Goals
 Are the interventions related to
look like in your district?
 Are they common core drop
down?
 Goals broad?
10/2/2015
student area of deficit ex. Reading
fluency?
 Are interventions specific to
student need?
 Do you know each student’s
current level of mastery in relation
to the intervention?
 Are sp.ed teachers tutors of
the standards?
68
Re-teaching/Remediation vs. Intervention
Re-teaching/ Remediation
Intervention
Tier I-Common Core Standards
Special Education Intervention
Goal is to reteach the standards
students are struggling with rather
than specific skill deficits. These are
your students who are very close to
reaching the next achievement
level based on the curriculum
standard measure.
Goal is to provide research-based
interventions aligned to specific
skill deficit(s) as identified by
multiple sources of data including
universal screening and progress
monitoring information.
69
Questions to Consider for Intervention
 Are the interventions related to the student’s areas of deficit?
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• For example: reading fluency, math calculation, written expression
Do the interventions relate to the measurable annual goal?
What must the student know and be able to do?
What accommodations/supports are needed to achieve the goal?
What interventions are needed?
How will we determine mastery?
How will progress toward goal be monitored?
What data must be collected and how often?
70
Guiding Principles for Intervention
 The measurable annual goal drives the intervention.
 The intervention provided in the continuum of services must be the
most intense intervention.
 The effectiveness of the intervention will be continuously monitored
to determine if the intervention needs to be changed.
 See Characteristics of intervention sheet
The goal of the intervention is to work towards the
measurable annual goal so the student meets his
goal and no longer requires an IEP.
71
Tier II, Tier III or Sped Intervention: Core
Instruction Plus A Skill Specific Intervention
Tier III
Sped
Intervention
Tier II
Core
Instruction
Accommodations
Accommodations
Special Education
Interventions
Core
Instruction
MAGs
Progress
Monitoring (Data)
Transition
Narratives:
Strengths, Concerns,
Adverse Impact
Present Levels of
Educational
Performance
(PLEP)
73
Accommodations and Modifications
 Accommodations change how the student is taught or expected to
learn.
• provide equitable access during instruction and assessments and
neither change the construct being assessed, nor compromise the
integrity or validity of the assessment or content.
• intended to reduce or even eliminate the effects of a student’s
disability;
• do not reduce learning expectations, if based on need
 Modifications change what the student is taught or expected to
learn.
• a change in what is being taught to or expected from the student
• The least dangerous assumption would be that students are able to
participate within the core curriculum without modifications unless
student performance data indicates otherwise.
74
Accommodations and Modifications

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










Accommodation
Graphic organizer
Text to speech with the book
Template for long division
Raised line paper
Calculator
Class lecture notes ahead of time
Completed agenda with homework
expectations
Sensory break “pass”
Picture schedule
Word processor for writing assignments
Shortened assignments
Assignment broken into smaller tasks
Oral assessment for understandings

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



Modification
Partially completed graphic organizer
with fewer links and less complexity
Low level high interest reading with
text to speech
Simple division facts with pictures,
graphics, manipulatives, or number line
Dotted words and letters to trace
Modified rubric for presentation to
include fewer elements and more
explicit understandings
Essential elements from instruction
taught with hands-on materials
Assessed on only a portion of the test
or concept
75
5 Step Process for Accommodation Selection
1. Expect all students to achieve grade-level academic content
2.
3.
4.
5.
standards
Learn about accommodations
Select accommodations
Administer accommodations during assessment
Evaluate and improve accommodation use
Accommodation Summary
 Enable students to participate more fully in instruction and
assessments and to demonstrate their knowledge and skills
 Based on individual needs and not disability category, English
language proficiency alone, level of instruction, amount of time
spent in a general education classroom, program setting, or
availability of staff
Accommodations must be based on a documented need in the
instruction/assessment setting and should not be provided for the
purpose of giving the student an enhancement that could be viewed as
an unfair advantage.
Not a MENU of options
Participation in State Assessments
 The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Title I of
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) each require
all students with disabilities to be included in State assessment
systems. The prohibition against exclusion from participation or
denial of benefits to, or discrimination against, individuals with
disabilities contained in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and
Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act applies to state
assessment and accountability systems.
 In addition to state assessments, the IDEA (section 612(a)(16))
requires that all students with disabilities participate in district-wide
assessment programs and that alternate assessments be provided
for students with disabilities who cannot participate in grade-level
assessments, even with accommodations.
78
State Assessment Participation Options
 General grade-level assessment, with or without accommodations
• TCAP Achievement Grades 3-8
• TCAP End of Course (for Secondary)
 Alternate assessment based on alternate academic achievement
standards
• NCSC for ELA and Math Grades 3-8, 11
• Alternate Science
• Alternate Social Studies (delayed until the 2015-16 school year)
79
Progress Monitoring
Accommodations
Special Education
Intervention
MAGs
Core
Instruction
Progress
Monitoring
(Data)
Narratives: Strengths,
Concerns, Adverse
Impact
Transition
Present Levels of
Educational Performance
(PLEP)
80
Progress Monitoring and Data Based Decisions
When progress monitoring is implemented correctly, some of
the benefits include:
 accelerated rate of learning because students are receiving more
appropriate instruction;
 more informed instructional/reevaluation decisions;
 documentation of student progress for accountability purposes;
 more efficient communication with families and other professionals
about students’ progress; and
 higher expectations for students by teachers.
81
Progress Monitoring and Data Based Decisions
 Progress monitoring should occur for students with disabilities as
frequently as for their nondisabled peers.
 Ongoing assessment of student learning provides continuous
feedback on the effectiveness of instruction and intervention.
 Data indicates areas where a change in instruction and intervention
may be required.
 Data points can be used to make decisions regarding instruction and
intervention. Once several data points are collected, a pattern of
response can be investigated.
82
Instructionally Relevant Data/Progress Monitoring
May Include












Structured observations of targeted behavior in class
Student self-monitoring checklist
Written tests
Behavior charting
Work samples
Summative Assessments
Formative Assessments
Curricular Based Measures (CBMs)
Academic achievement
Functional performance
Social development
Physical development and management needs.
83
References

http://www.ksde.org

www.pattan.net

Tennessee Department of Education Website
http://www.tennessee.gov/education/speced/secondary_trans.shtml

TOPS (Transition Outcomes Project) Information
http://cuttingedj.net/index.html

GAO report on Problems that Impede Youth Transition
http://www.gao.gov/assets/600/592329.pdf

NSTTAC - National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center
http://nsttac.org/

Transition Innovation – Region V Technical Assistance &
Continuing Education Center (TACE)
[email protected]
Helpful Links
RTI Resources

Tennessee Department of Education Website
http://www.tennessee.gov/education/speced/secondary
_trans.shtml

TOPS (Transition Outcomes Project) Information
http://cuttingedj.net/index.html

GAO report on Problems that Impede Youth Transition
http://www.gao.gov/assets/600/592329.pdf

NSTTAC - National Secondary Transition Technical
Assistance Center
http://nsttac.org/


Transition Innovation – Region V Technical Assistance &
Continuing Education Center (TACE)
[email protected]
Special Education -- State Personnel Development
Grants Program
www.tnspdg.com
Re-Evaluation Temporary
Solutions
Free Resources
 EasyCBM.com
 DIBELS.com
 http://www.interventioncentral.org
Universal Design for Learning
http://www.cast.org/
http://www.udlcenter.org/
Tie Hodack
[email protected]
Executive Director, Instructional Programs
Theresa Nicholls
[email protected]
Director, Special Education Eligibility
Lori Nixon
[email protected]
Director, Assessment Design
Case Study and Review of the Morning
Andrew Smith
Norms
We Will:







Be open to others’ views and input
Share experiences and ideas
Determine roles and responsibilities
Ask questions within and outside of our own group
Provide constructive feedback
Be engaged in the presentations and group work
Be respectful and turn all technology to silent mode during work
time
88
Procedures
Roles and Responsibilities of Group Members

Make sure that each person in your group is serving in at least one role. If you have more than 4 people in your
group, have more than one Timekeeper/Gatekeeper. If you have less than 4 people in your group, have group
members serve in more than one role. Everyone should serve as a secondary facilitator, helping make the group’s
work easier.
Small Group Facilitator

The Facilitator leads the discussion, making sure that everyone is fully participating.

Examples of getting all to provide input: “Will each person give your thoughts about what data we should
include in our present levels of performance?”

“As the most highly qualified professional providing the most intense intervention, what supports
would we have in place for our student? What do you all suggest? We will start with (name) and go
around the group”.
Scribe

The Scribe writes the information for the group on the presentation chart
Reporter

The Reporter reports the small group's work to the whole group.
Timekeeper/ Gatekeeper

The Timekeeper keeps track of the time and makes sure that the group finishes the task on time as well as
ensuring everyone remains on task.
89
Procedures
 This activity is meant to simulate the collaboration that is needed to
gather all the necessary information to write an instructionally
appropriate IEP.
 As a professional educator, there might be times when you receive a
file on a student and there will be things missing. This is a time
where you might have to go look for the information to make your
file complete.
– For example, you might need to discuss with the general education teacher,
special education teacher, school psychologist, and any one else necessary
to make sure all information is collected.
90
Developing A Strong Narrative
A quick snapshot describing the student’s strengths and
concerns
Must include:
• Student’s strengths
• Parent concerns in their own words, to the greatest extent
possible
• Impact on Mastery of Standards/Core Instruction
• Medical information, even if no concerns (don’t leave
blank)
• Must pass the “stranger test”
91
Narratives Include:
Medical Information:
Describe the student’s strengths:
Describe the concerns of the parents regarding their student’s education:
Adverse Impact: Describe how the student’s disability affects involvement and
progress in the general curriculum:
92
Narratives:
Medical Information:
Ex. Susan’s parents indicated there are not medical concerns at this
time.
• Do not leave this area blank
Student’s Strengths:
Ex. Specific Learning Disability-associated deficit in ReadingSusan has strong listening comprehension skills. She enjoys listening to
information when it is presented orally, and recalls information very
easily. She has a strong sight word vocabulary and tends to utilize this
as her primary strategy when reading independently.
93
Narratives:
Parent Concerns:
Ex. Specific Learning Disability-associated deficit in Reading.
Mr. & Mrs. Test are very concerned about Susan's reading progress.
They report that she is easily frustrated when she has to read
independently and worry that she will only fall further behind.
Impact on Mastery of Standards:
Ex. Specific Learning Disability-associated deficit in reading
Susan's deficits in the areas of basic reading skills, specifically phonics
& decoding, and fluency impacts her mastery of reading standards as
well as impacts her access and participation in core instruction. At this
time, she is does not have the skills necessary to independently read
information in academic areas which interferes with comprehension.
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Developing A Strong PLEP
A summary of assessments aligned to area(s) of need
Must include:
• Student’s current assessment data
• Narrative description about skills assessed
• Impact on mastery of standards
• Exceptional: yes or no
• Positive terms and language
• Must pass the “stranger test”
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Example PLEPS
Associated Deficits of Specific Learning Disability in Reading

Test of Silent Word Reading Fluency (TOSWRF) In looking at Susan's protocol,
it appears that she worked very slowly. She managed to divide 45 words on the form,
but made 10 errors. Her descriptive rating indicated that she fell within the below
average range placing her at the 13th percentile. Based on expected third grade
norms, Susan is significantly behind for her current grade level. This impacts her
mastery of standards throughout content instruction as third grade is the year
instruction switches from learning to read to reading to learn. Exceptional: Yes

Curriculum-Based Measure: Given a 1 minute fluency test, Susan accurately
sounded 42 letters. This represents the 45th percentile according to winter norms.
Word Identification Fluency: Susan identified 6 words from the CBM third grade
word list in one minute. This represents the 10th percentile according to winter
norms. Her difficulties with phonics and word identification impacts her mastery of
standards.

Reading Fluency-Given a 1 minute grade level passage, Susan read 25 words
correctly with 11 errors. This is significantly below the 10th percentile according to
winter norms. Susan is significantly behind grade level average compared to her
third grade peers in word identification fluency and reading fluency and will be
impacted her mastery of reading standards. Exceptional: Yes
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Developing A Strong MAG
A clear description of an observable behavior a student will be
able to do within one year
Must Include:
• Condition
• Behavior
• Performance criteria (How well? How consistently? How
often? How measured?)
• Must pass the “stranger test”
 Look at the template provided
101
www.pattan.net
http://www.ksde.org
Goal Statement- Let’s Practice!
 Given__________________
(condition/materials/setting/accommodation), ________________ (student
name) will __________________ (do what measurable/ observable
skill/behavior in functional terms), _______________________ (to what
extent/how well to determine mastery), _________________ (# of
times/frequency/how consistently), by _______________________ (how
often) evaluated/determined by _________________(measure).
103
Goal setting with CBM data
 Step One: Determine Typical Rate of Improvement (ROI)
(_____________
Spring benchmark
expectation
-
_____________)
Fall benchmark
expectation
/
______36_______
Number of weeks
=
___________
Typical ROI (slope)
104
Let’s Practice!
Measure
Words Read Correct (WRC)
Fall Benchmark Expectation
60 WRC
Spring Benchmark Expectation
100 WRC
105
Goal setting with CBM data
 Step One: Determine Typical Rate of Improvement (ROI)
(___100______
Spring benchmark
expectation
-
_____60______)
Fall benchmark
expectation
/
______36_______
Number of weeks
=
___1.11______
Typical ROI (slope)
106
Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Two: Determine Goal Rate of Improvement (ROI)
_________
x
_____2_____
=
Typical ROI
_____________
Aggressive ROI
OR
___________
Typical ROI
x
______1.5_______
=
_____________
Reasonable ROI
107
Let’s Practice!
 Step Two: Determine Goal Rate of Improvement (ROI)
___1.11______
x
_____2_____
=
Typical ROI
____2.22_________
Aggressive ROI
OR
____1.11_______
Typical ROI
x
______1.5_______
=
____1.67_________
Reasonable ROI
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Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Three: Calculate Student Goal
_________
Initial Score
+
__________
(Goal ROI) X (# of weeks)
=
_____________
Goal Score
109
Let’s Practice
Student’s initial score
20
Goal ROI
1.67
Number of weeks
36
110
Goal Setting with CBM data
 Step Three: Calculate Student Goal
___20______
Initial Score
+
__60.12________
(Goal ROI) X (# of weeks)
=
_____80.12________
Goal Score
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Goal Statement
 Given a 2nd grade reading passage, Joanne will accurately read 80 words
correct on three consecutive data days using a weekly reading curriculum
based measure.
112
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Link MAG to Characteristics of Intervention
• This is not added into Easy IEP
115
Characteristics of the
Most Intensive Intervention
Potential intervention components:
• specifically target student’s skill deficit
• are research based, explicit, and systematic
• are more intensive than general education interventions
• for academics, must be more intensive than Tier III
• provides support to students in addition to intervention
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Accommodations
Accommodations change the “how”
Must address:
• Core instruction participation and access
• Assessment participation and access
• Student’s entire school day; not limited to ELA & Math
119
Modifications
Modifications change the “what.” This is a very significant decision
that should only be considered as a last resort.
 Scaffolding, accommodations, support, interventions, and
additional adult assistance should all be tried first with data
collected to determine effectiveness and fidelity of each
accommodation.
 Modifications are restrictive by nature. They are only the Least
Restrictive Environment (LRE) once all other options have been
implemented with fidelity and data has been collected. Only then
can we determine that modifications are required.
120
Considerations of Service Delivery
• Least Restrictive Environment
– All students are general education students first
– All students receive high quality core instruction— for
students with the most significant needs, the “how” and
“where” is the “I” in IEP
• Areas of deficit
• Intervention required to meet student’s need
– Directly linked to the MAG
– A person is not an intervention
121
Considerations of Service Delivery Cont.
• Student independence
– The MAGs should be increasing the student’s skills so he or she
requires increasingly less accommodation/modifications the
following year.
• Collaboration between general and special education teachers
• Training support for staff/peers
– May be noted in the MAGs under “details—supplementary
supports for school personnel”
Ex: A child has a visual schedule. A special education professional
would provide a fifteen minute training to all staff on that particular
schedule.
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Progress Monitoring
 How will you know if the intervention is working?
 Monitor progress at least as often as non-disabled peers
• Once a week
• Once every other week
 Monitor progress in student’s identified area of need
 If the intervention is working, keep going!
 If the intervention is not working, the team may need to consider
changing the intervention
125
What is Adequate Progress?
126
What is Adequate Progress?
127
Sharing what has been developed
 Present Your Student (Case study)
128
Moving Forward—Self Reflection
 What questions do you still have?
 Who on your team/school/LEA can assist you moving forward?
 How will you communicate about the changes to parents? When? In
meetings, prior, multiple times?
 What interventions do you have available at your school?
 What interventions might you need?
 How will your schedule be different next year?
If you have questions you would like answered, please place the index card
in the box in your room.
129
Programming team
Joann Lucero, Literacy Intervention Specialist
[email protected]
Ryan Mathis, Mathematics Intervention Specialist
[email protected]
Alison Gauld, Behavior and Low Incidence Coordinator
[email protected]
Jill Omer, Speech, Language and Autism Coordinator
[email protected]
Tie Hodack, Director Of Instructional Programs
[email protected]
Theresa Nicholls, Director, Special Education Eligibility
[email protected]
Josh Stanley, High School Intervention and Transition Coordinator
[email protected]
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Writing an Instructionally Appropriate IEP