WRITING SB-IEP
GOALS
Jennifer Brown
ADE Special Education Unit
AR CEC – November 2012
What are SB-IEP Goals?
• Standards-Based IEP Goals are goals written based on
two things:
• a student’s specific Present Level of Performance in a
skill/knowledge area
• a specific standard or functional skill area
Old to New: A Comparison
Old Way of Developing Goals
SB-IEP Goals:
• The standard was the goal.
• The Present Level was separate
from the specific standards and
goals, and…
• The Present Level was often
incomplete or spotty, due to
difficulty in aligning it to a whole
group of standards.
• Since the standard was the goal, it
was not very measurable or
attainable.
• Goals did not inform instruction
beyond the most basic level.
• The standard anchors the goal.
• The Present Level is specific to
each standard and goal, and may
be specific to only a portion of a
standard.
• You may have more than one goal
per standard, addressing different
parts of the standard.
• Since the goal is tied to specific
skills or knowledge to be
mastered, it is both measurable
and attainable.
• Goals (& objectives) do inform
instruction.
Student Profile Page (SB IEP #101)
Parental Participation and Concerns
Student Profile Summary
What are we summarizing?
• A general statement on the student’s academic and functional
needs, based on recent assessment data
• Address strengths and needs AND changes in functioning
since last IEP
• Achievement of Annual Goals
• Performance in related service areas
• An description of any significant lack of progress
II. Transition Section
All areas of post-secondary life:
Include data from transition assessments:
Move from general to specific
SB IEP #103A
Goal Page (No Objectives)
SB IEP #103 B
Goal Page with Objectives
Which Standard?
• IEPs should discuss the intent of
standards
• What are the knowledge and skills
necessary for the student to achieve
to a level that is expected in the
standards?
• What are the prerequisite skills?
Selecting the Standard
• Determine which standards are
most important for each student,
based on progress in the general
education curriculum
• Compare standards with student’s
areas of need and the impact of
the disability
• Use data to determine the areas
the student will find difficult
without additional supports
Impact Considerations
Which Standards/Functional
Areas:
Which Standards/Functional
Area are most essential to:
• Can be met with accommodations
in the general classroom?
• Require specialized instruction?
• Accelerate the ability to progress
in the general education
curriculum?
• Result in educational benefit?
It is Important to prioritize, and to recognize the
difference between “Need to Know” and “Nice to
Know”.
Writing Present Level Statements
• Describe performance in academic and non-academic areas
• Include the relationship between evaluation/assessment data and
the Present Level statements
• Use objective, measurable terms
• Ensure data is self-explanatory (or provide an explanation of the
data in the description)
• Data should give a description of what the student can do, and of
the gaps in skills/knowledge related to the student’s disability
• Data and description should be very specific to the standard, or the
portion of the standard, that has been identified as a critical area of
need for the student (same for functional area)
Types of Data
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•
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Academic
Social/Emotional
Behavioral
Communication
Recreation/Leisure
Vocational
Health/Physical/Medical
Home/Independent Living
Assistive Technology
Reports on
Accommodations/Modifications
Present Level Language
Examples
Non-Examples
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Greets peers appropriately
Counts to 25
Speaks in 1 to 2 word sentences
Writes answers to double digit
addition
• Names five careers and jobs
associate with each
• Independently operates multiple
models of microwave ovens
• Counts to 10 or finds a friend when
angry or frustrated, per behavior
plan
Is friendly
Received a math score of 90
Can’t talk well
Can add
• Knows different careers
• Can cook
• Monitors her own behavior
Impact Statement
• This is the “so-what” statement
• The grand finale of the Present Level Statement
• This is where you explain how the deficits described in the Present
Level Statement impair the student’s ability to make progress in the
general education curriculum.
• This statement is similar to the Adverse Affect Statement on the
Evaluation Programming Conference form, except it is much more
specific.
DEVELOPING GOAL
STATEMENTS
Annual Goals
• Are related to needs resulting from the
student’s disability that directly affect
involvement and progress in the general
education curriculum (or age-appropriate
activities)
• Give specific information about
knowledge or a skill that the student
should be able to demonstrate at a
mastery level
• Are relevant, reasonable and attainable,
and challenging
Two Ways to Organize Goal Writing:
SMART Goals
5-Point Goals
• Specific
• Measurable
• Achievable
• Results-oriented
• Time-bound
•
•
•
•
•
The student (who)
Will do what (behavior)
To what degree/level (criterion)
Under what conditions (Context)
In what length of time
(Timeframe)
Sample Goal Statements
• Given a informational text written
at the 7th grade level, Todd will
read 170 words per minute with
90% word accuracy by the end of
the 2012-2013 school year.
• Given a one-minute addition drill,
Jana will complete a minimum of
25 single-digit addition problems
correctly before time runs out, by
the end of the third nine weeks
grading period.
• When asked to brush her teeth,
Brittany will follow a task-analysis
guide with picture cues to
complete the 10-step process in
order, in 4 of 5 attempts by the
end of 4th grade.
• Given a daily planner, Henry will
record his assignments in each of
his classes for all seven periods
daily, with 95% completion over
the course of the month, by the
end of the semester.
What’s missing?
• 1. Hannah will score 85% or above
on her weekly spelling tests with a
list of 10 words.
• Tony will not be aggressive
towards staff at all in the 2012-2013
school year.
• Make a grade of “B” or higher on
all chapter tests in Geometry for
the 2012-2013 school year.
• Given a organized opportunity,
Cara will appropriately greet the
other person in 3 of 4 attempts by
the end of the first semester.
• Given a task analysis for making
microwave popcorn, Javier will
successfully complete the task by
the end of the school year.
• Michael will master NS.1.3.2 by the
end of the third grade.
Objectives
• Short-term objectives and benchmarks are steps that measure the
student’s progress toward the annual goal.
• These should provide the teachers of the student with a roadmap
and clear mechanism to evaluate the child’s progress.
• They are a logical breakdown of the major components of the goal.
• They are not a detailed instructional plan.
• They are written in measurable terms.
• They may be sequential (scoot, crawl, walk).
• They may be parallel skills (decode accurately, read at 90 wpm).
An example:
• Goal:
• Objectives:
• Given a reading passage at the 5 th
grade level, Jen will demonstrate
comprehension of the text by
answering “wh” questions with
90% accuracy, by the end of the
2012-2013 school year.
• Jen will answer “who” questions
with 90% accuracy.
• Jen will answer “what” questions
with 90% accuracy.
• Jen will answer “where” questions
with 90% accuracy.
• Jen will answer “why” questions
with 90% accuracy.
Another example:
• Goal:
• Given a cookbook with pictures
supporting the written directions,
Hank will follow the recipe and
successfully make the food item
without verbal prompting, in 4 of 5
attempts by the end of the school
year.
• Objectives:
• Hank will read the recipe/directions
before beginning to cook, in 5 of 5
attempts by the end of the first 9
weeks.
• Hank will collect all needed
cookware and tools in 4 of 5
attempts by the end of the second
nine weeks.
• Hank will collect all needed
ingredients by in 4 of 5 attempts by
the end of the third nine weeks.
• Hank will follow all the steps in the
directions in order in 4 of 5 attempts
by the end of the fourth nine weeks.
Goal Development Progression
Student
Profile
•Snapshot of
the student
Identify &
Prioritize
•What needs are
most critical?
Choose the
Standard
•Based on
Priorities
•Can also be
functional area
Develop
Present
Level
•Specific to the
standard or
functional area
Develop
Goals &
Objectives
•Measurable
breakdown of
needed skills
LET’S PUT IT ALL
TOGETHER…
Identify Areas of Need and Prioritize
Student
Profile
•What is the big
picture?
Identify &
Prioritize
•What are his
needs?
•Which are most
important?
List Johnny’s needs:
1.
2.
3.
Prioritize the needs:
1.
2.
3.
Standard, Present Level, Goal
Choose the
Standard
•What standard
best addresses
the area of
deficit?
Develop
Present
Level
•Strengths
•Needs
•Data Sources
Develop
Goal
•SMART
•5-Part
• There may be more than one
standard that is applicable: pick
the best match to the skills.
• Make sure the Present Level
Statement is specific to the skills
and knowledge of the standard.
• Make sure your goals are written
to address an area of deficit
identified in the Present Level
statement.
• The mastery level should be based
on the data given in the Present
Level Statement.
Identify Areas of Need and Prioritize
Student
Profile
•What is the big
picture?
Identify &
Prioritize
•What are her
needs?
•Which are most
important?
List Tina’s needs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Prioritize the needs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Functional Area, Present Level, Goal
Choose the
Standard
•Which functional
area best
addresses the
area of deficit?
Develop
Present
Level
•Strengths
•Needs
•Data Sources
Develop
Goal
•SMART
•5-Part
• There may be more than one
functional area that is applicable:
pick the most important, or have
multiple goals.
• Make sure the Present Level
Statement is specific to the skills and
knowledge required to perform in
the functional area.
• Make sure your goals are written to
address an area of deficit identified
in the Present Level Statement.
• The mastery level should be based
on the data given in the Present
Level Statement.
Wrapping Up
Student
Profile
• Snapshot of the
student
Identify &
Prioritize
• What needs are
most critical?
Choose the
Standard
• Based on Priorities
• Can also be
functional area
Develop
Present
Level
• Specific to the
standard or
functional area
Develop
Goals &
Objectives
•Measurable
breakdown
of needed
skills
•
•
•
•
•
•
SMART GOAL
Specific
Measurable
Achievable
Results-oriented
Time-bound
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
OR
5-Point Goal
The student (who)
Will do what (behavior)
To what degree/level (criterion)
Under what conditions (Context)
In what length of time (Timeframe)
QUESTIONS?
Check out the full training materials at
the ADE Special Education website:
arksped.k12.ar.us/
Contact Jennifer Brown at:
[email protected]
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Writing SB