Sense and nonsense of
Internationalization
Ludwig Neyses
Vice-president for Research
University of Luxembourg
Professor of Medicine/Cardiology
University of Manchester, UK
(joint appointment)
Maastricht, April 10-12, 2015
Internationalization – risk and opportunity
Content
What do we mean by internationalization?
• Background
• Internationalizing your own institution
(Paradigm Uni Luxembourg)
• Expanding globally
• Implications for the individual scientists
The power of internationalization I
• OECD countries spend 1,6% of GDP on higher
education, compared with 1,3% in 2000
• America spends 2,7% of GDP on higher
education
The Economist 28/03/15
The power of internationalization II
$ 5 x 1012 Education globally (2014)
~ 250 x 106 students (~ 3% of world population)
~ 5 x 106 intl. students (2% of all students)
~ $ 100 x 109 generated by intl. students
(~ $ 20 000 each)
OECD, 2012/14
The (financial) power of internationalization III
Example UK
(Germany – next talk)
•450 000 intl. students
•Thereof: 300 000 from outside EU
•~ 7-9 x 109 £/year (~ € 9-13 x 109)
• Economic benefits beyond fees (e.g. engineers
etc.)
Why internationalization – academic argument I
We are the oldest existing secular and international
institutions
• Higher Ed. + degree!
• Research: Alexander v.Humboldt (~1809)
Why internationalization – academic argument II
• The top 200 global institutions in the THE
ranking have an average of ~ 20% intl. staff
• The Swiss Polytechnics (Lausanne and Zurich)
have ~ 70% intl. staff
• BUT: not passport, but intl. career is key
Phil Baty,
THE ranking editor
Content
What do we mean by internationalization?
• Background
• Internationalizing your own institution
(Paradigm Uni Luxembourg)
• Expanding globally
• Implications for the individual
scientists
Uni Luxembourg
• A new university; founded in August 2003
• Trilingual (French, English, German)
• Bologna process right from the start (Bachelor,
Master, PhD)
• Research centred
• Connected to the financial centre, the EU
Institutions, to the business world and society
• Individual mentoring and personal atmosphere
Uni Luxembourg
~ 6200 Students
–
–
–
–
3300 Bachelor’s (11 degrees)
1200 Master’s (31 degrees)
550 PhD ‘candidates’ (students plus 50% post, ~€ 40k/yr)
1140 in other programmes
•107 nationalities
1500 Employees
– 239 professors, assistant-professors, lecturers
– Supported by 730 professional experts
•69 nationalities
Faculties and research centres
Interdisciplinary
Centre for Security,
Reliability and Trust
Luxembourg Centre
for Systems
Biomedicine
Five Focus Areas of Research
 Security, Reliability and Trust in Information
Technology
 Molecular and Systems Biomedicine
 International Finance
 European and Business Law
 Education and Multilingualism
Our future campus: Belval – European par
excellence
Student and staff nationalities @ uni.lu
Benefits of intl. students I
• Widen worldview
• Languages
• Increase competitiveness of the country
e.g. UK study: non- EU postgraduates outstrip
UK students in maths, computer science,
engineering, performance?)
Benefits of intl. students II (plus staff)
The key advantage:
‘Spiral Spirit’ – attract the best staff,
who attract the best students (at least
at postgrad. level)
Uni Lu – the most international (?in the world)
SWOT – benefits of intl. staff
Top academic and other staff (if truly intl.
careers), trilingual, multicultural, flexible,
ve
Communication (meetings…), cultures
Ahead of most other places
Acceptance as opportunity, fragmentation
Content
What do we mean by internationalization?
• Background
• Internationalizing our own institution (Paradigm
Uni Luxembourg)
• Expanding globally
• Implications for the individual scientists
Expanding globally – the potential
Pilot: “I’m Sorry,
Ma’m”
She: “Thanks for
dropping in”
From: Kent News and Pictures,
27/02/2008
Expanding globally – Purpose?
• Money – attract students (e.g. Nottingham 104
intl. students => ~£ 90 x 106/year, fees alone)
• Academic
– Nottingham: 2 branch/campuses => attract students,
staff, collab. science
– New York University (NYU) 16 “off campuses”, not-for
profit, “circulation of minds”
• Charity
• Connect to the first world (e.g. Monterey,
Mexico)
Hai – Sui Yu (N’ham); John Sexton (NYU) 2015
Expanding globally - The issues
•
•
•
•
Purpose: money? Circulating minds?
Cost – little information
Mental energy cost
Future? (see: Japan in the 1980s)
Content
What do we mean by internationalization?
• Background
• Internationalizing our own institution (Paradigm
Uni Luxembourg)
• Expanding globally
• Implications for the individual scientists
My journey
Mainz, Montpellier, London, Zurich, Bonn, Durham,
Wurzburg, Detroit, Manchester, Luxembourg
The international senior scientist - SWOT
Choice of scientific environment (science
environment, funding); personal
experience, language (writing!)
Communication, cultures (e.g. prof. role) –
right or wrong perceptions
Improved intl. career prospects
“Glass ceiling” (e.g. management),
currency speculation (pension!), (we need
EU ‘Resaver’)
Key messages – Sense and nonsense of
internationalization
• ≥ 20% truly intl. senior staff - survival
principle -‘right (wo)man, right place’
• Intl. students – a boon (pick the best, best staff)
• (external) campi – purpose? Efforts? Cost?
• Individual scientist: full integration
(management)?; career prospects; currency
speculation with your salary and pension
Thank you for your attention
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