Current Realities of Spanish
Speaking English Language
Learners in our Field.
Numbers and needs, preferred and best practices,
client/student interviews, survey results, learning
English as a second language, and culturally relative
programming
Introductions
Matt
• BA in Spanish and
Latin American
Studies
• Ed.S TVI University of
AZ
• COMS University of
AZ
• Special
Projects/Programming
in Mexico, Peru, and
Puerto Rico
• Currently at Puerto
Rico VA hospital
Jessica
• B.A. in Spanish for
International Service
• M.Ed. in Orientation
and Mobility from
UMASS Boston
• Currently working at
the Miami Lighthouse
for the Blind and
Visually Impaired
SNAPSHOT
- Current realities in our field, numbers,
philosophies of learning English as a
second language
- student/client interviews (Jessica
interview a client)
- surveys, what do the ELL students and
their instructors think
- Spanish Braille to reinforce literacy with
native Spanish speakers
- Culturally relevant programming case
study – Lighthouse Miami
- Assessments and placements
- Brainstorming- what can we do???
CURRENT REALITIES IN THE FIELDNUMBERS
- 2004-5 5.1 million or 10.5 % of the
U.S. student population= ELLs
(Payan & Nettles)
- 80% are from Spanish speaking
backgrounds (P&N)
- From 1990-91 to 2000-01 the ELL
population grew 105 % while general
population grew only 12% (Kindler
2002)
- ELLs population growing 9 times
faster than the general population
- In the field of Visual Impairments
“The best we can say is that we can estimate that the number of students with
visual impairments who are ELLs should be similar to the number of ELLs in the
population of students without visual impairments”- Madeline Milian Ed.D UNC
Benefits of using Spanish
•
•
•
•
Cultural Adaptation
Functional
Academic
ASU Civil Rights Projectwhen students are pulled
out of class to participate
in an English only block
• Low self esteem,
stereotyped by English
speaking peers, working
at a lower cognitive level
Philosophies of Learning English as
a Second Language
•
•
•
•
•
•
1st language proficiency helps 2nd
language proficiency
BICS- can develop at age
appropriate levels in 2 years
CALP- can develop 5 to 7 years
“a minimum level of competence in
the primary language is required
before a student can reap the
benefits of bilingual education”Cummins (1984)
“it is unlikely that older students’
proficiency in English will exceed
proficiency in their mother tongue”Bates
Children can acquire 2 or more
languages at the same timeGarcia (2005)
•
•
•
•
•
•
“Code-switching” enhances
meaning (G,G,D, &K 2006)
Misconceptions of English onlydoes NOT help English 2nd
Language Acquisition (Garcia et al,
ASU, 2010)
After 4 years in an English only
programs students scored much
lower than students in bilingual
programs
Transfer theory
Consider IEP goals and
programming, braille
Involve parents with native
language development as well as
English development
Student interview
Client: O.
• Demographics: 53 year old
Hispanic male
• Visual Impairment: NLP due to
an automobile accident in
1985
• Additional Impairments: None
• Educational Level: Postsecondary technical certificate
• Personal History
O.’s Training and Goals
Services: Independent Living
Program
Personal Goals:
• O&M
• Complete rehabilitation
training
• Personal Management and
Home Management
• Move to an apartment on his
own
• Braille
• Learn English
• Keyboarding
• Employment
Student/Instructor Surveys
-Survey Monkey
-Very small group but it still tells us
something
-62.5% have only been working
with Spanish Speaking ELLs for
the last 1-5 years
-50% are predominantly using
English when instructing
-100% agree or strongly agree that:
“basic Spanish” and providing
materials in Spanish = more
effective instruction, a better
understanding of instructions and a
better relationship
Culturally relevant programming at the
Miami Lighthouse
Client Demographics:
Jessica’s Adult Caseload:
• 53% of clients are of
Hispanic origin
• 15 center-based adult clients
are Spanish speaking only
• Of 563 clients served
55% lived in areas of
poverty and 310 lived
below the poverty line
• 3 out of 4 community-based
are Spanish speaking only
(1 is bilingual)
*Statistics from July 2010June 2011*
*As of October 2011*
Instructional Staff (by
department):
• Case Management: 2/2 are
bilingual
• Personal and Home
Management: 2/2 are bilingual
• Orientation and Mobility: 1/3.5 are
bilingual
• Computer, Braille and Job
Readiness: 3/5 are bilingual
Programs:
• Adult: IL, ILAP, VR,
Scholarship
• Transition
• Star I and II
• Blind Babies
Services:
• Low Vision Services
• Solutions Store
• Center-based and
community-based
instruction
• Personal and Home
Management, O&M,
Keyboarding,
Computers, Braille, Job
Readiness
• SGA (Social Group
Activities)
• Support Group
• ESOL Classes
Addressing cultural and Linguistic Needs
•Website and pamphlets available in
Spanish
•Bilingual Instruction
•ESOL classes offered
Family participation is encouraged
Assessments and Placements
-
-
-
“Hispanics” over-represented in special
education programs (Artiles, Trent &
Palmer, 2004)
Language acquisition vs. a learning
disability
RTI, response to intervention
Monitoring Progress
Instruction
Literacy and Phonological awareness
-
Assessment recommendations
Placements
IEP goals related to English language
learning
Spanish braille
Materials and Handouts
• Materials in
Spanish- Low
Vision/O&M
bilingual dictionary
• Low Vision
conditionspowerpoints and
info sheets from NEI
• TEXT Versions
Brainstorming
- What can we
do at a
University
Level to
address the
needs of these
students?
- What can we
do at an
Administrative
level?
- What can we
do at an
instructor’s
level
State rehab
facilities,
summer
camps for
language
How can AER
facilitate this
process?
Descargar

Current realities of Spanish Speaking English Language