Multicultural Issues in Psychology
Introduction to Asian-American Culture
Melvin W. Wong, Ph.D.
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
ChristianMentalHealth.com
[email protected]
Northwest College
Graduate Psychology
2002
Ministry Opportunity
Global Population, In Millions
Total 6.14 Billion
339, 5.5%
L.A.* N.A.*
476, 7.8%
Europe
728, 11.9%
Asia Pacific
Christian Population, In Millions
Total 1.9 Billion
N.A.*
213, 11%
Latin
America
483, 25%
Africa
771, 12.6%
3,701, 60%
Asia/Pacific
335, 18%
Europe
537, 28%
Africa
344, 18%
* L.A. = Latin America,
N.A. = North America
The Ten Lenses
to Living & Working in a
Multicultural world
By Mark A. Williams
Capital Books Inc. 160 pages, $14.95
A Matter of Perspectives
We can pretend that we are objective, but in
our objectivity, we are selective - subjective
As we interact and communicate, our
experiences and values affect our
expectations perceptions and reactions
Each of us has a metaphoric lens through
which we view the world
Differences Enhances or
Alienates
Finding ways to effectively communicate with
a wide variety of people from a multiplicity
of backgrounds is just good business
Whatever our intentions, it is difficult to
transcend lingering xenophobia or
ethnocentrism
10 Perspectives & Positions
1.
Assimilationist
6.
Meritocratist
2.
Color-Blind
7.
Multiculturalist
3.
Cultural-Centrist 8. Seclusionist
4.
Elitist
9.
Transcendent
5.
Integrationist
10.
Victim/Caretaker
Questions of 10 Perspectives
What is the mature perspective? Why?
 How is the influence of fear & insecurity
manifests in these perspectives?
 Win-Lose Paradigm: What Perspective?
 Win-Win Paradigm: What Perspective?
 What is the mature Christian perspective?
 How to overcome these barriers?
 What happens to people who are victims?

Assimilationist (1)
“When in Rome, do as the Romans do”
Wants individuals to submerge their cultural
identities in favor of nationalistic and
patriotic ideals; believes that primary
allegiance should be to the welfare & unity
of our nation; does whatever is needed to fit
in with and support an organization’s vision,
mission, values, strategies and cultural
norms
Color-Blind (2)
“When I see you, I see a person not your
color”
Sees people as individuals, and ignores race,
color, ethnicity and other external cultural
factors; wants to look at a person’s
individual qualities and character; believes
that ignoring race and color will have an
equalizing effect
Cultural-Centrist (3)
“My color is central to my personal & public
identity”
Seeks to improve the welfare of their cultural
group by accentuating history and identity;
argues that institutions detached from the
mainstream are an important ingredient to
the success of their culture because they
encourage cultural pride
Elitist (4)
“Membership has its privileges”
Believes in the superiority of the upper class;
embraces the importance of family roots,
wealth and social status
Integrationist (5)
“Ebony & ivory live together on my piano
keys: Shouldn’t we?”
Supports breaking down of all barriers between
racial groups by merging people of different
cultures in communities and the workplace;
believes we can replace our ignorance of each
other’s culture with a greater understanding
and knowledge; wants laws to reinforce this
idea
Meritocratist (6)
“Cream Rises to the Top”
Believes in the individualistic credo of America:
If you have the abilities and work hard
enough, you can compete with anyone to
make your dreams come true;
disapproves of programs that use race, culture,
ethnicity, class or any cultural attributes as
criteria for opportunity
Multiculturalist (7)
“the More Cultural Diversity the Better”
Celebrates the diversity of cultures and
contributions they make to national
character and history; wants to retain their
customs, languages and ideas;
believes these characteristics create an
appealing and colorful mixed salad, a
metaphor often used to describe this
perspective
Seclusionist (8)
“Birds of a Feather Flocks Together”
Feels strongly that they should protect
themselves from racial, cultural, and or
ethnic groups that diminish the character
and quality of their group’s experiences
within the society;
believes the only viable solution to challenges
related to race and culture is for different
groups to live and work apart
Transcendent (9)
“There’s really only one race: the human
race”
Focuses on universal connection and shared
humanity.
Race, ethnicity and nationality are a part of
God, the Universe’s plan and contribute to
the richness of humanity
Victim/Caretaker (10)
“We Shall Overcome”
Feels that they still suffer from the impact of
previous oppression; deserves compensation
from society and the dominant culture; sees
oppression as contemporary; still producing
overwhelming odds for their group’s
survival and prosperity
Course Requirements
Class Attendance & Finish the Reader
Each student is expected to complete
any one of the following three paper
assignments
Option 1: A Case Study
Option 2: A Theoretical Study-presentation
Option 3: Critique of the 10 perspectives
Paper 1: A Case Study
Paper 1: A case study of the impact of culture on one
aspect of a psychological symptom (of a person; a
client, a congregation member or family member).
Students are required to present a study of an
individual (someone that you have counseled,
someone that you know as a friend or relative) will
suffice.
Give an introduction, a family history with a
genogram, a description of the one-symptom that
marks the pathology, a formulation of the cultural
correlation and some suggestion for a brief treatment
recommendation.
Paper 1: A Case Study
(No differential diagnosis is required.)
A BRIEF written (not more than 10 pages)
summary is to be presented to the office by
the time as set forth by the seminary office.
Do not give paper to the instructor.
While paper presentation in class is not required,
extra credit could be earned and students are
encouraged to sign-up (by indicating to the
instructor) to make their presentations
Paper 2: A theoretical studypresentation
Paper 2: A theoretical study-presentation of
the impact of Chinese culture on
psychopathology as manifested in the clinical
population (or church-based communities):
The Intervention recommendations:
Students are required to present a more detailed
theoretical study of the effects of the influence (subtle
or obvious) on the development of psychological
disorders, depending on the work environments of a
student, such as a clinician or a minister.
Paper 2: A theoretical studypresentation
This paper is intended to facilitate the understanding
of the student in formulating a prevention response
towards a wellness approach in their line of work.
A BRIEF written (not more than 10 pages) summary
is to be presented to the office by the time set forth by
the seminary office. Do not give paper to the
instructor.
While paper presentation in class is not required,
extra credit could be earned and students are
encouraged to sign-up (by indicating to the instructor)
to make their presentations
Paper Option 3:
Questions of 10 Perspectives
What is the mature perspective? Why?
 How is the influence of fear & insecurity
manifests in these perspectives?
 Win-Lose Paradigm: What Perspective?
 Win-Win Paradigm: What Perspective?
 What is the mature Christian perspective?
 How to overcome these barriers?
 What happens to people who are victims?

Chinese is a “River Culture”

Fate of survival depends “nature’s ways”
– Need for rain, sunshine, no flood, no pests

Communities are important for survival
– During harvest time, floods and famines

Harmony is important for survival
– Smooth interpersonal relationships facilitates work

Non-aggressive (contrast with “Island Cultures”)

Dependence on nature and conditions for crops
Position of village-house critical to survival

Chinese Cosmology: Triadic Forces
Balance: Relationship-Emotions

Goal in life is to master the eternal balance of the
three relationships between heaven, earth & men.
Heaven-Earth-Person: Relationship & Love Based
There is a God in Heaven: Sense of Justice & Fairness
Parent-Child: Love analogous to heavenly love

Ethnocentrism (Sinocentrism):



Chinese Pictograph
狂
The “animal inside” becomes “king”
(taking over our self-control and made us
do “crazy” “wild” and irrational things)
China: The Central Kingdom
中
國
Chinese Cosmology: Triadic Forces
Balance: Relationship-Emotions





Goal in life is to master the eternal balance of the
three relationships between heaven, earth & men.
Heaven-Earth-Person: Relationship & Love Based
There is a God in Heaven: Sense of Justice & Fairness
Parent-Child: Love analogous to heavenly love
Ethnocentrism (Sinocentrism): “foreign
devils.” Frame of reference: Idiosyncratic
The Triadic Balance (三和) of
Relationships and Emotion

Heaven-Earth-Person: Relationship & Love Based
–
天 地 有 情

There is a God in Heaven: Sense of Justice & Fairness


–
舉 頭 三 尺 有 神 靈
Parent-Child: Love analogous to heavenly love
–
孝 感 動 天
Openness & Acceptance of Errors
–
人 誰 無 過
Next Session

Friday, March 8
– Show movie “To Live” also known as “Lifetimes”
– Introduction to the last fifty years of modern day China
– Introduction to the specific political movements
»
»
»
»

Psychological effects on the Chinese people on the mainland
Psychological effects on the Chinese people off the mainland
Psychological effects on the Chinese people in Taiwan
Psychological effects on the Chinese migration
Saturday, March 9
– Continue with Chinese cosmology
Descargar

Asian-American Culture & Philosophies