Designing speech and
language services for the future:
getting started
Steven Harulow
Alison Stroud
Alison McCullough
Mary Turnbull
The Planning Cycle
Stage Five
How do we ensure arrival?
Stage Four
Which way is best?
Stage One
Where are we now?
Stage Two
Where do we want to be?
Stage Three
How might we get there?
Developing a marketing plan
for your service (SOSTAC)
Situational analysis
Objectives setting
Strategy development
Tactics
Application
Control
Situational analysis
Macro-environmental
Analysis:
Factors from
outside the
industry
affecting your
service
Micro-environmental
Analysis:
Internal Analysis:
Factors from
Stakeholder factors
inside the industry
affecting your service
affecting your service
Macro analysis: PESTLE
Political
Economic
Social
Technological
Legislative
Environmental
Micro analysis: Porter’s 5
Forces Model
Threat of new entrants
Bargaining
power of
suppliers
Competition
among
existing
firms
Bargaining
power of
customers
Threat of substitute products
Potential entrants
Barriers
Buyers
Suppliers
Substitutes
Micro environment analysis – health,
education and social care data
Sources of information
• Your own records
• Information gathered from your team and
from other teams who you work with
• Statistics provided by your local and
regional public health departments
• National statistics
• Focus groups, face-to-face interviews
• Feedback cards/forms
Micro environment analysis – health and
education and social care policy etc
• Look at the new NHS Commissioning
guidelines
• Financial pressures in the NHS, central
and local
• Evolution of an NHS led by market forces
• New Ways of Working
Internal analysis: McKinsey’s Seven Ss
So-called “hard” factors
So-called “soft” factors
Structure:
Strategy:
Systems:
Shared values:
Staff:
Skills:
Style:
TOWS or SWOT analysis
Threats
(external)
Opportunities
(external)
Weaknesses
(internal)
Strengths
(internal)
Setting Objectives: Where do we want to be?
Specific
Measurable
Agreed
Resourced
Time-bound
Intelligible
Exhaustive
Strategically-linked
Mission statement
“To promote and develop
speech and language therapy”
Corporate aims
To engage with SLTs, governments, the
allied health professions and partners,
helping to strengthen speech and
language therapy as an integral part of
the modern health, education and social
care sectors.
To support the delivery of high quality
services by ensuring speech and language
therapists are properly trained, supported
by a body of evidence and provided with
ongoing opportunities for professional
development.
Strategies (Strategic aims)
1. To influence
Government and
public policy,
promoting the
interests of the SLT
workforce and
people with
communication
support needs
2. To ensure
the RCSLT is
fit-forpurpose and
resourced to
meet its
corporate
aims
3. To set robust
professional
standards and
to support the
profession in
meeting them in
the interests of
service users
4. To be recognised
internationally as a
key organisation
for SLTs and seen
as organisation
with influence
How might we get there?
Developing a strategy
Strategies for growth – the Ansoff matrix
Existing products
Market penetration
Existing
market
New
market
Sell more McDonald’s
burgers/breakfasts to those
who already eat them, eg
longer opening hours
New products
New product development
Sell new products, to existing
customers, eg McCafe
Japan: Teriyaki burger;
India : McMasala (lamb)
New market
development
Diversification
Sell burgers to people that
don’t already eat them
Eg Golden Arch Hotel in
Switzerland
Competitive Advantage
Competitive scope
Lower Cost
Differentiation
Broad
Target
Cost leader
Differentiation
Narrow
Target
Cost focus
Differentiation
focus
Note : Low cost has increasingly become a market
prerequisite rather than an option
SUPPORT ACTIVITIES
Porter’s Value Chain: showing your core
competencies
FIRM’S INFRASTRUCTURE
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT
PROCUREMENT
INBOUND
LOGISTICS
MARGIN
OPERATIONS OUTBOUND MARKETING SERVICE
LOGISTICS
PRIMARY ACTIVITIES
& SALES
Which way is best? Tactics: the seven Ps
Product
Physical evidence
Price
People
Place
Process
Promotion
Are we there yet?
The balanced scorecard evaluation
method
• Financial perspectives
• Customer perspectives
• Staff perspectives
• Innovation perspectives
The Balanced Scorecard
Financial
perspective
How do customers
see us?
Goal
Internal
perspective
Goal
Measure
Innovation &
learning perspective
Goal
Can be used for
benchmarking
What must we
excel at?
Measure
Customer
perspective
Goal
How do we look
to stakeholders?
Measure
How can we continue to
improve and create value?
Measure
The next steps
You should have gathered and organised enough information not just to
plan how your service can be improved, you should also have gathered
enough information to help you promote your service to commissioners
and others. You will:
Know how your services can help address local and national priorities
Have robust information from patients and the public on their views of
your service
Understand how you can organise things better internally
Understand the costs and benefits of the services you offer
Know how, when and where to extend your services (and what you might
need to let go of)
Have convincing and comprehensive information on the effectiveness of
your service
ARE YOU IN A BETTER POSITION TO PROMOTE YOUR SERVICE
AND ATTRACT FUNDING?
What are commissioners looking for?
• Demonstrate need
• Propose a solution
• Provide robust evidence of efficacy
• Link in with local and national priorities
• Provide evidence of the quality of service
• Show how you will measure quality?
• Get help
• Build relationships
• Be unique
• Take your time and get it right
• Make sure it is well presented and easy to read
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Designing SLT services for the future – getting started