Credit for Education
in Mexico
Office of Secondary Education
for Migrant Youth (SEMY)
Objectives
Orientation to education in Mexico
Interpret an academic record
Serve student with no records
Verify accuracy of records
Placement considerations
Prepare student to return to study in Mexico
Sources of Information
Texas Migrant Interstate Program
Mexican Consulate, Seattle
Binational Program, Center for Migrant
Education, Southwest Texas State
University, San Marcos
Website maintained by the Secretary of
Public Education, Mexico
Orientation
to education
in Mexico
Overview

Schools operate 10 months a year (200 days)

School year = typically 2 semesters (mid-Aug. to midDec., then 2nd wk in Jan. to end of June with 2 weeks off
in April)

Students are tested 5 times per year (Handouts D, E)

Final grade is average of those 5 grades

80% attendance required to promote
Minimum Curriculum
Washington
Minimum = State Board of Education
Additional = School District
Mexico
Minimum = National Education System
Optional
= National Institute of Technology
Curriculum Tracks
Normal track – academic courses in
preparation for college, and in some
cases a teaching career
 Tecnología track – academic courses
in preparation for college, and also
courses to prepare for a specific
technical career

Handout J
Purely
Vocational?
15% of students in Mexico attend
high schools with
Educación Profesional Técnica
in their names. Only these do not
qualify the graduate for admission
to a university in Mexico.
Special education






In a primaria or secundaria school serving 3 or more
students with handicaps or disabilities, these students
are staffed by a team of specialists including:
social worker
psychologist
speech/language therapist
special education teacher
Students with severe disabilities or physical handicaps
are offered enrollment in CAM multiple attention centers:
Escolarizado: academics, primaria & secundaria
Laboral: vocational, secundaria & beyond
Length of school
year
Length of classes
Number of
semesters
Number of
grading periods
Review &
Remember
Source of final
grade
Curriculum tracks
You’re doing
great!
Interpret an
academic
record
Recommended Steps
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
My student?
Level of schooling reported
Timeframe reported
Translate course titles
Translate course grades
Account for all
formal education
Understanding naming patterns
Juan Jose Hernandez Sanchez
Given
Name
Middle
Name
Father’s
Family
Handout J
Mother’s
Family
Juan Jose Hernandez Sanchez
married
Maria Luisa Sosa Perez
who then was known as
Maria Luisa Sosa de Hernandez
Juan Jose Hernandez Sanchez
and his wife
Maria Luisa Sosa de Hernandez
became the proud parents of
Jose Luis Hernandez Sosa
Handout F
The family enrolled Jose in school in
Mexico as
Jose Luis Hernandez Sosa
When they moved to Washington, the
secretary abbreviated his name as
Jose L. Hernandez
When he enrolled in junior high,
the secretary noticed his father’s
name and enrolled Jose as
Jose Luis Sanchez
What was the student’s class standing?
Primaria (grades 1-6)
Secundaria (grades 7-9)
Preparatoria (“Bachillerato” on transcript)
(grades 10-12+)
Universidad (college)
Is the student in Handout L in college?
Refer to Handout A
If the record lists the grade level…
Washington
Junior High
7th grade
8th grade
High School
9th grade
10th grade
11th grade
12th grade
Mexico
Secundaria
Primero grado
Segundo grado
Tercero grado
Bachillerato
Primero grado
Segundo grado
Tercero grado
What years in school might Handouts D & H cover?
Begins in Secundaria,
repeats in Bachillerato
If the semesters are listed…
Primer
Segundo
Tercer
Cuarto
Quinto
Sexto
What
grade
levels are
reported in
Handout I?
If the number of the grading period is
listed…use this as a general guide
1st – septiembre and octubre
2nd – noviembre and diciembre
3rd – enero and febrero
4th – marzo and abril
5th – mayo and junio
Break – julio and agosto
Handouts E & G
Passed all
courses + 80%
attendance?
Yes
PROMOTED
No
Failed 6 or
more?
No
Extraordinary
examinations
(Aug, Sept, Feb)
Yes
HELD BACK
Handout N
Dates covered by this record
September 16,
2004
9/16/04
16 de
septiembre
de 2004
16/9/04
Translate the course titles
The student in Handout I completed
Derecho 1 and Derecho 2. Use
Handouts B and C to find a suggested
translation for that title.
How might we translate the four
Contabilidad courses the student
completed?
Handouts B & C
Translate the grades earned.
Washington
A = 10 (perfect)
A=9
B=8
C=7
D=6
F = 5.9 and below
Mexico
Handout L
Essential first steps
for review of
transcript
4 levels of
education in Mexico
The 3 grades of
Secundaria or
Bachillerato
Review &
Remember
The 6 semesters of
Secundaria or
Bachillerato
Translate grades
Half way point!
Serve a
student with
no records
Types of records
Their “certificate of completion” is like
our transcript. It includes grades for
individual courses. Handout L.
 Their “transcript” is like our diploma. It
verifies program completion and overall
grade point average. Handout K.

Who can obtain
Certificate of Completion?
In person:
• The student
• A close family member
By mail:
• The Mexican Consulate
Your friends
in the Mexican
Consulate!
Dept. of Community Affairs
Consulate of Mexico
2132 Third Ave.
Seattle, WA 98121
(206) 448-8938
Fax (206) 448-4771
Mexican Consulate Needs
 Student:
complete name,
date of birth
 Last school attended:
name, location, year
last attended
(no charge)
Because all students in 7th through 9th grade
complete the same minimum curriculum in
Mexico, while awaiting records we can
tentatively place
the student in classes.
Beginning in the
second semester
of 10th grade,
classes vary
according to the
school’s emphasis.
Primero (1st yr) of Secundaria
(7th Grade)
135 seat hrs each:
225 seat hrs each:


World History I
 World Geography
 Civics & Ethics
 Biology
 Intro Physics & Chem.
 Foreign Language
 Vocational Education

Spanish
Mathematics
90 seat hrs each:


Art
Physical Education
Segundo (2nd yr) of Secundaria
(8th Grade)
135 seat hrs each:
225 seat hrs each:


World History II
 Physics
 Chemistry
 Foreign Language
 Vocational Education

Spanish
Mathematics
90 seat hrs each:

Mathematics
 Geography of Mexico
 Civics and Ethics
 Biology
 Art
 Physical Education
Tercero
rd
(3
yr) of Secundaria
(9th Grade)
135 seat hrs each:
225 seat hrs each:


History of Mexico
 Civics & Ethics
 Physics
 Chemistry
 Foreign Language
 Hist/Geog of State
 Vocational Ed

Spanish
Mathematics
90 seat hrs each:


Art
Physical Education
Handout D
Bachillerato (Preparatoria)

Curriculum varies by school
 May include a 13th year
 School may specialize in preparation for a
specific career field
 Expensive to attend
 School is self-supporting
 Unavailable in many rural regions
Learning from CONEVyT
What’s CONEVyT?
 Portal funded by OSPI for Washington
school districts through Yakima SD website
 High school courses articulated with
Yakima course offerings (chart)
 Can CONEVyT help your families?
 Learn more - Jorge Herrera (509) 573-7087

Verify accuracy
of records
Mexican Consulate Needs
 Clear
copy of document
you received
 Signed request on your
school letterhead for
confirmation of authenticity
and accuracy
(no charge)
What’s a transcript
called in Mexico?
What’s a diploma called
in Mexico?
Best source of an
educational record
Vital clue: 7th, 8th, or 9th
grade transcript?
Review &
Remember
Important differences:
Secundaria, Bachillerato
What’s CONEVyT?
Look at all
you’ve learned!
Placement
considerations
Importance of
Credit for Partial Work

Highly mobile students like migrant students,
who have sometimes studied in Mexico,
move frequently between school districts as
their families follow crop cycles.
 For these students, a barrier to high school
graduation is lack of credit for the partial work
completed before moving.
You can help!

Interview the student to fill in gaps in the
educational record.
 Obtain documentation of partially completed
work from high school transcripts, withdrawal
forms, and the Migrant Student Information
System, a statewide database www.msdr.org
 When comparing credit earned in semester,
trimester, quarter and block schedules, use
seat hours as a common denominator.
Then…

Enroll the student in the part of a
course she lacks to complete the
credit. The Washington State PASS
Program allows this flexibility.
 When the student has finished the
work, document full credit on the
student’s high school transcript.
Wespac-Skyward

To simplify the entry of schools in Mexico into
Wespac-Skyward, WSIPC has approved the
counselor’s use of just one address each for
the 32 states in Mexico.
 If you later have a student who has studied in
that state in Mexico, you will be able to simply
select it from the list of schools you’ve
previously entered.
Handout R
REMINDER
Your goal is to account
for all formal education
completed by this student.
Has the student studied in the
U.S. before enrolling in your
school?
WHERE
will you graduate?
Investigate requirements via Internet
Help parents and student develop a plan
Make sure the student’s portfolio travels
with the student to the next school
attended
Handout Q
GREAT Websites
Contact any U.S.
public school:
http://nces.ed.gov/globallocator/
Any state’s graduation requirements:
http://education.umn.edu/nceo/Topic
Areas/Graduation/StatesGrad.htm
Finish PartiallyCompleted
Courses

OSPI endorsed
 Accredited through the Sunnyside School
District
 Aligned with EALRs
 Your school gets the FTEs
Challenged to
motivate your
migrant students?
Multi-day migrant student conference
OSPI endorsed
Build professional skills of educators
Curriculum aligned with EALRs
www.semy.org
Students
– Role models for migrant
youth
– Financial assistance
– H.S. diploma important?
– Career exploration
 Educators
– Innovative strategies
– Links to great resources

Essentials for Providing Guidance
to Secondary Migrant Students
Get your free copy at
www.semy.org
Prepare student to
return to study in
Mexico
Transfer Document for
Bi-National Students
Students in grades 1 to 9 need this
 Issued by Mexican Consulate (Seattle)
or MSDR (Sunnyside 1-800-274-6084)
 In sealed envelope, submit official
transcript from last WA school attended.
 Free service. 24 hr. processing time.

Handout M
Apostille

Students in grades 10 to 12 need this
 Issued by Secretary of State, Olympia
 In sealed envelope, submit official
transcript signed by Principal or Asst
Principal. Fee = $15.
 Cover letter to include:
 Student’s full name
 Country asked to accept Apostille (Mexico)
 Parents’ daytime phone number
 Where to send Apostille (next school)
Address for Apostille

By mail (preferred): Secretary of State,
Corporations Division, Apostille &
Certification Program, PO Box 40228,
Olympia, WA 98504
(processed in 4 working days)

In person (urgent only): 801 Capitol
Way South, Olympia, WA. Open M-F
8-4:00
Why is partial
credit important to
mobile students?
An essential
question to ask the
student
Bi-National
Transfer
Document:
grades, purpose,
source
Apostille: grades,
purpose, source
Review &
Remember
You’ve
done
it!
Did we achieve
our objectives?
Orientation to education in Mexico
Interpret an academic record
Serve student with no records
Verify accuracy of records
Placement considerations
Prepare student to return to study in Mexico
Questions
Evaluation
Alfonso R. Anaya, Director
Migrant and Bilingual Programs
OSPI
P. O. Box 47200
Olympia, WA 98504
(360) 753-1137
http://www.k12.wa.us/migrant/
Office of Secondary Education
for Migrant Youth
Linda Roberts, Director
810-A E. Custer Ave.
Sunnyside, WA 98944
(888) 727-7123
http://www.semy.org
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Secondary School Credit for Education in Mexico