IB Primary Years
Programme Level 1B
Angela Schmidt and Nely Miguel
Purpose of the Workshop
Explore the Essential Elements of PYP
Create and understand Central Ideas
Illuminate Central Ideas through Lines of
Inquiry
Write authentic assessment
Use the elements of PYP throughout the
workshop as you would in the classroom
Learn through and about inquiry
Elements of the Workshop
Transdisciplinary Skills MIH pg 21 - 23
TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILLS
SOCIAL
SKILLS
COMMUNICATION
SKILLS
THINKING
SKILLS
RESEARCH
SKILLS
SELFMANAGEMENT
SKILLS
Accepting
Responsibility
Listening
Acquisition of
Knowledge
Formulating
Questions
Gross Motor Skills
Speaking
Respecting
Others
Fine Motor Skills
Comprehension
Reading
Spatial Awareness
Application
Cooperating
Group Decision
Making
Adopting a
Variety of
Roles
Planning
Writing
Organization
Analysis
Resolving
Conflict
Observing
Non-Verbal
Communication
Collecting Data
Synthesis
Recording Data
Evaluation
Organizing
Data
Dialectical
Thought
Time
Management
Safety
Healthy Lifestyle
Interpreting
Data
Metacognition
Presenting
Research
Codes of
Behaviour
Informed Choices
Elements of the Workshop
Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner
Elements of the Workshop
Attitudes MIH pg 24 - Profile MIH pg 4 - International Mindedness MIH pg 5
ACTION
MIH pg 25 - 27
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Definition and characteristics
What are the attributes of an inquiry-based
activity?
Read MIH pg. 28 - 30 (10 minutes)
Place mat activity (10 minutes)
Shared list
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Definition and characteristics
The act of inquiring; a seeking for information by
asking questions; interrogation; a question or
questioning
Search for truth, information, or knowledge;
examination into facts or principles; research;
investigation
Understanding is built on what the learner already
knows and believes
Moving from current level of understanding to a
deeper level of understanding
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Definition and characteristics
Student-centered. Creates a learner-centered
environment
Can be structured, guided or open
Uses multiple sources of information
Addresses multiple intelligences
Engages the learner, is interesting, provokes
curiosity
Engages the learner with the social and physical
environment to make sense of the world
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Definition and characteristics
Involves higher order thinking like observing,
selecting, clarifying, developing theories,
connecting, synthesis, analyzing, interpreting,
comparing, hypothesizing, explaining and
providing alternatives
Assessment criteria is set by the learner as well
as the teacher
Assessment is done by the learner as well as the
teacher
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Some definitions from research:
“Inquiry is transformation. The resolution of a
problematic situation may involve
transforming the inquirer, the environment,
and often both. The emphasis is on transformation.”
John Dewey, 1938
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Some definitions from research:
“ Inquiry-based learning is often described as
a cycle or a spiral, which implies formulation
of a question, investigation, creation of a
solution or an appropriate response,
discussion and reflection in connection with
results.”
Ann Peterson Bishop et al. 2004
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Some definitions from research:
“ Scientific inquiry refers to the diverse ways
in which scientist study the natural world
and propose explanations based on the
evidence. Inquiry as a teaching technique is
the creation of a classroom where students
are engaged in open-ended, studentcentered, hands-on activities.”
Alan Colburn, 2000
Inquiry-based Teaching
and Learning
Reflection - Visible Thinking
I used to think…… but now I know…..
http://www.pz.harvard.edu/vt/index.html
http://www.pz.harvard.edu/tc/routines.cfm
http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/inquir
y/index.html
The PYP Curriculum Model
The curriculum is written, taught and learned and emphasizes
learners constructing meaning
W hat do
w e w ant
t o lear n?
Lear ner s
C o nst r uct ing
H o w w ill w e
kno w w hat
w e have
lear ned?
© IBO 2003
M eaning
H o w best
w ill w e
lear n?
PYP Essential Elements
KNOWLEDGE
CONCEPTS
SKILLS
ATTITUDES
ACTION
PYP Essential Elements
Number by 5’s
Jig-saw - read 10 minutes and then share
1 - KNOWLEDGE
2 - CONCEPTS
3 - SKILLS
4 - ATTITUDES
5 - ACTION
MIH pgs. 10 - 27
Why a Conceptual
Curriculum?
“The traditional design of a curriculum
did not come into question when
business operated with an industrial
model that called for factory workers
who could follow orders , carry on
repetitive tasks with little thought, and
work in relative isolation……
Why a Conceptual
Curriculum?
…But business has changed drastically, and
education is adapting to meet the need for
workers who can identify and solve
complex problems, think independently as
well as in team situations, and exhibit the
characteristics of leaders no matter what
their job in an organization.”
Lynn Erickson, 2002
Why a Conceptual
Curriculum?
A.K.A. Enduring Understanding - Power
Standard - Central Idea
From the following list, with your table
group, decide if the statement represents
a central idea that is concept-based
If it is not, change the central idea to make
it concept based.
Share out
CENTRAL IDEAS?
Natural and man-made disasters impact people and the
environment.
2. My family tree has many branches.
3. Computers help people in their daily lives.
4. Survivors of the tsunami face risks and challenges.
5. People need families and friends.
6. Every country has qualities and attributes that make it
unique.
7. Air supports our lives, and its uses are determined by
its properties.
8. Rules and laws help people live safely and peacefully.
9. A variety of signs and symbol systems were developed
to communicate.
10. Family histories impact our past and present, and
influence our futures.
1.
Self Reflection
Practicing the elements of the PYP
What transdisciplinary skills did
you use?
What attitudes did you
demonstrate?
What profile traits?
Why was this inquiry?
PYP Essential Elements:
Knowledge
Content of learning
Integrate the standards
Guided by the lens of the PYP concepts
Written as “Inquiry”
3 or 4 per unit
Concepts and Knowledge
Enduring Understanding?
PYP Essential Elements:
Active Learning
Create a Central Idea or Enduring Understanding
With corresponding inquiries or essential questions
Using the template, by specialty or grade level write a
Central Idea
Criteria:
Globally transferable
Timeless - can be studied at any age and any era
Relevant and engaging
Challenging and age-appropriately complex
Scope for transdisciplinary inquiry
Academic rigor
Not value laden
PYP CONCEPTS
Form
Function
Causation
Connection
Perspective
Change
Reflection
Responsibility
What PYP Concepts will be emphasized in this
unit?
Write 3 teacher questions that capture the
essence of what is important to know
PYP Organizing Themes
(Transdisciplinary)
Organizing themes
Interdisciplinary
Intradisciplinary
Transdisciplinary
The organizing/transdisciplinary themes
ensure a broad conceptual and knowledge
base horizontally and vertically throughout
the POI
ASSESSMENT
How will we know
what we have learned?
PYP Essential Elements:
What is Assessment?
Summative assessment
Formative assessment
Pre-assessment
Read MIH Pg. 44-53
Stand and Deliver
“When the cook tastes the
soup, that is formative. When
the guests taste the soup,
that is summative”
Robert Stakes
“Formative assessment is to
summative assessment what
a physical is to an autopsy ”
DuFour, DuFour, Eaker
“ You can enhance or destroy students’
desire to succeed in school more
quickly and permanently through the
use of assessment than with any other
tools you have at your disposal.”
Stiggins
PYP Essential Elements:
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
Active Learning
How do you know that you know?
Complete the activity “What Do I do
Well”
Synthesize characteristics of
authentic assessment.
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
What do I Do Well?
How do I know I do
it well?
What were the
steps taken to
learn it well?
Example:
I have a good tennis serve
I often ace my
opponents, even
some who are better
players than I am
My serve has spin
My serve has power
I toss high, bend my
legs and put my body
into it
Modeled by a pro
Practiced
Broken down to one
improvement at a time
e.g. Toss height and
location, legs,
shoulders,
Good analogies like
throwing a ball
Model -practice
Example: I listen well
People confide in me
and seek me out for
advice.
People tell me I am a
good listener.
I give time to the
person needing to talk.
I listen to what is said
and feed back what I
have heard to the
speaker to make sure I
have understood the
situation.
I have taken courses on
active listening.
I have practiced active
listening in workshops
with others.
I have learned to listen
to what is being said
before formulating
questions or solutions.
I have developed this
skill in my work as an
administrator.
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
Active Learning
Synthesize characteristics of
authentic assessment with your
table
Share out
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
What Researchers Say
“A form of assessment in which
students are asked to perform
real-world tasks that demonstrate
meaningful application of
essential knowledge and skills.”
Jon Mueller
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
What Researchers Say
"...Engaging and worthy problems or
questions of importance, in which
students must use knowledge to fashion
performances effectively and creatively.
The tasks are either replicas of or
analogous to the kinds of problems
faced by adult citizens and consumers
or professionals in the field.”
Grant Wiggins
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
What Researchers Say
"Performance assessments call
upon the examinee to demonstrate
specific skills and competencies,
that is, to apply the skills and
knowledge they have mastered."
Richard J. Stiggins
What Makes Assessment
Authentic?
Reflection/Active Learning
Any additions, changes to our description
of authentic assessment?
Develop a summative assessment for your
Central Idea
Assessment Strategies and
Tools Grant Wiggins
Creating a Balance of Assessment
Strategies and Tools
How Best Will We Learn?
Learning Activities and Formative
Assessments
What experiences will encourage students to
address the driving questions?
Think across disciplines
Think across intelligences
Think differentiated resources
How will we assess to adjust instruction?
MIH Pg. 41
Collaborative Planning Workshop
Self-Assessment
WHAT DID I LEARN?
The purposes of this workshop
Look at your questions
Did we meet the purpose of the workshop?
Did we answer your questions?
What did you learn well enough to teach
someone else?
What are your “new” questions?
Purpose of the Workshop
Explore the Essential Elements of PYP
Create and understand Central Ideas
Illuminate Central Ideas through Lines of Inquiry
Write authentic assessment
Use the elements of PYP throughout the workshop
as you would in the classroom
Learn through and about inquiry
Resources
Barth, Roland. Restructuring Schools: Some Questions for Teachers and
Principals. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass,1991.
Bishop, A.P.,Bertram, B.C.,Lunsford, K.J. & al. Supporting Community
Inquiry with Digital Resources. Journal Of Digital Information, 5 (3:) 2004.
Buzzeo, Toni. “Collaborating to Meet Standards: Teacher -Library Media
Specialists Partners for K-6”.Ohio: Linworth, 2002.
DuFour, Richard. http://www.allthingsplc.info (online) March, 2008
DuFour, Richard and Robert Eaker. “Professional Learning Communities
at Work”. Virginia :Solution Tree: 1998.
Erickson, Lynn. Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction: Teaching
Beyond the Facts.” California : Corwin Press: 2002.
Gibbs, Jeanne. “Tribes: A New Way of Learning and Being Together”.
California: Center Source, 2001.
Hughes, Marcia and James Bradford Terrell. “The Emotionally Intelligent
Team”. San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, 2007.
Kanter, R. The Turnaround Solution. 2004
Katzenbach, J.R., & Smith, D.K. The wisdom of teams: Creating the high
performance organization. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press,
1993.
“Leading Teams.” Boston : Harvard Business School Press, 2006.
“Making It Happen.” International Baccalaureate.
Resources
Montiel-Overall, Patricia. “Towards a Theory of Collaboration for
Teachers and Librarians”. American Association of School Librarians,
2002.
Robbins Harvey and Michael Finlay. “The New Why Teams Don’t Work.”
San Francisco :BK Publishers, 1995.
Patterson, Kerry, Joseph Greeny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler. “Crucial
Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High”. New York :
MsGraw Hill, 2002.
“ Running Meetings.” Boston : Harvard Business School Press, 2006.
Schrage, Michael. “Shared Minds”. Random House: New York, 1990.
Tuckman, Bruce. “Forming-storming-norming-performing”. 1970.
Urbanski, A (1992) as quoted by Dunklee,, Dennis. “If You Want to Lead
Not Just Manage”. California: Corwin Press, 2002.
Tomlinson, Carol Ann and Jay McTighe. “ Integrating Differentiated
Instruction and Understanding by Design”. Virginia: Association for
Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2006.
“What Work Requires of Schools: A SCANS Report for America 2000”.
U.S.Department of Labor, June 1991, pp. xvii-xviii.
Wndover, Robert . The Center for Generational Studies. http://ww
w.gentrends.com/
Wiggins, and McTIghe. “ Understanding by Design”. Prentice Hall;
Expanded 2nd edition, 2005.
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PowerPoint Presentation - Collaborative Planning in the PYP