Hispanic Heritage
Presented by
Stephanie & Karla
Marketing 301 Ethnic Food Project
Etymology of Hispanic
• Hispanic
• Spaniard
• 'Latin America‘
• Mexico
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Geography of Spain
Climate:
temperate; clear, hot summers in
interior, more moderate and cloudy
along coast; cloudy, cold winters in
interior, partly cloudy and cool along
coast
Terrain:
large, flat to dissected plateau
surrounded by rugged hills; Pyrenees
in north
Natural resources:
coal, lignite, iron ore, copper, lead,
zinc, uranium, tungsten, mercury,
pyrites, magnesite, fluorspar, gypsum,
sepiolite, kaolin, potash, hydropower,
arable land
Land use:
arable land: 28.6%
permanent crops: 9.56%
other: 61.84% (1998 est.)
Natural hazards:
periodic droughts
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Geography of Mexico
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Climate:
varies from tropical to desert
Terrain:
high, rugged mountains; low coastal
plains; high plateaus; desert
Natural resources:
petroleum, silver, copper, gold, lead,
zinc, natural gas, timber
Land use:
arable land: 13.2%
permanent crops: 1.1%
other: 85.7% (1998 est.)
Natural hazards:
tsunamis along the Pacific coast,
volcanoes and destructive
earthquakes in the center and south,
and hurricanes on the Pacific, Gulf of
Mexico, and Caribbean coasts
Geography - note:
strategic location on southern border
of US; corn (maize), one of the world's
major grain crops, is thought to have
originated in Mexico
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Latin American Geography
Central & South America
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Area 7,930,845 sq miles
Population 560, 287,688
Countries 20
– Antigua and Barbuda,* Argentina,
Bahamas* Barbados, Bolivia, Belize,*
Brazil ,Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Cuba, Dominica,* Dominican Republic,
Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada,*
Guatemala, Guyana,* Haiti, Honduras
,Jamaica,* Mexico, Nicaragua,
Panama, Paraguay, Peru ,Suriname,*
St. Kitts,* St. Lucia,* Saint Vincent, and
the Grenadines,* Trinidad, and
Tobago,* Uruguay, Venezuela .
Dependencies 4
Languages Spanish, Portuguese, French,
Quechua, Aymara, Nahuatl, Mayan
languages
Largest Cities Mexico City,
São Paulo,
Buenos Aires
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Spanish Culture
• Cultural centre of Europe.
• Spain has an extraordinary artistic heritage.
• Spain's architecture
• Music
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Mexican Culture
• Religion
• Language
• Music
• Education
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Latin American Culture
•Latin America is of mixed origins
• Language
• Music
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"The Three Cultures of Mexico"
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When the Spanish arrived in Mexico in
1519 they mixed with the Indians and thus
began a long process in which two races
and two cultures, equally great but totally
different, became fused: the Mexico of today
was born. The influence of these two
cultures is patent in all aspects of life in this
country.
The Indian-Iberian mixture is reflected in
poetry, music and dance in which the
Mexican gives out his soul in freeing himself
from his reserved personality. In these
artistic manifestations one finds all the
scope of the Mexican sentiments, from the
secretiveness and stoicism of the Indian to
the boisterous expressiveness of some of
the Spanish influences. The modern
Mexican feels just as deeply the poetry of
Góngora as that of Netzahualcoyotl, and
enjoys dances such as the Spanish jota
aragonesa as much as the Mexican jarabe
tapatío, or the baile del quetzal.
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The Catholic religion, imposed by the
Spanish, also reveals the lndian influence.
The modern Catholic rites are often mixed
with the rituals of the religions of the preColombian as it can be seen during the
festivities of the Day-of- the-Dead, to name
only one example.
It is in the architecture where the
evidence of the two original cultures is most
palpable. In Mexico and its sur- roundings,
there are the palaces and churches
constructed after the conquest. These
buildings have the undeniable stamp of
Spain, but the indigenous artisan left his
style molded in them. The Indian image can
be appreciated in the faces of the angels
that adorn many of the churches, notably in
Santa Maria Tonantzintla and San Francisco
Acatepec, in the state of Puebla. These are
truly baroque jewels of the Indo-European
art.
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Tamales
Ethnic Food
Etymology of Tamales
• Corn
– "The sense of the O.E. word was "grain with
the seed still in" rather than a particular plant.
• Tamale
– A food made of Indian Corn and Meat
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History of Tamales
• Tamales date back to preColombian (before Columbus)
Mexico and possibly even
further. No history of the
tamale would be complete
without discussing the process
of "nixtamalization".
• Nixtamalization
• In the 1550's the Spaniards
were served tamales by the
Aztecs during their first visits to
Mexico.
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Varieties of Tamales
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Specialty version examples of some of the variations listed by region:
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Culiacan, Sinaloa
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Veracruz
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Oaxaca
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Monterrey
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San Cristobal de las Casa, Chiapas
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Yucatan
Michoacan
North Western Mexico
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Packaging
Nutritional Content
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Old World to New World
Over the millennia, the varieties were minimized to the most
common now being red and green chili, chicken, pork, beef,
sweet, chile, cheese, and of late, vegetables. Also changed was
the every day occurrence of making the tamales. With the
preparation being so labor and time intensive, tamales became
holiday fare, made for special occasions. This tradition remained
for thousands of years, with the women of the family working
together to make the sauces and meats, preparing the masa,
and finally assembling and wrapping the tamales before
steaming them in large pots on the stove. The process takes all
day, the preparation often starting one of two days in advance. It
is virtually unheard of to make a few tamales. In most cases,
when they are made, hundreds are made at a time. Everyone,
young, old, family and friends, is invited to tamale feasts where
they are enjoyed, savored and loved by all.
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Triangulate
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Tamales were developed as a portable ration for use by war
parties in the ancient Americas, and were as ubiquitous and varied
as the sandwich is today.
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Tamales are a favorite quick breakfast dish in Mexico, where you
can see street vendors serving them from huge, steaming, covered
pots (tamaleras). Often the tamal is placed inside a bread roll to
form a torta de tamal, which is substantial enough to keep the
breakfaster going until Mexico's traditionally late lunch hour.
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Tamales are popular as Christmas meals in the southwestern
states of the USA. A basic modern southwestern tamale contains a
spicy meat filling, usually shredded pork or beef, and is often
served with a chili con carne sauce.
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Target
• College Students (Ages 18-25)
• Families
• Elderly People (Ages 65+)
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Taste
• Product
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Frozen Tamales packaged in a Galvanized "Bote Tamalera" (Tamale Steamer)
• Place
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Grocery Stores, Fast Food Type Restaurants, Whole sale stores, Markets
• Promotion
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Hispania Foods
“Old World Foods…Made for Today!”
• Price
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Type
Ingredients
Half dz
One dz
Pork Meat, red chile
sauce, olive (mild)
$11
$33
RED PORK CHILE
Manchaca Beef
Shredded Beef, Red
Sauce, Jack cheese
$20
$ 40
Chorizo Potato
Chorizo, Potatoes, jack
cheese
$ 16
$ 32
Pork Tomatillo
Pork meat, tomatillo
sauce
$ 17
$ 34
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Hispanic Heritage