REAL WAYS TO HELP
STRUGGLING STUDENTS
A NEW LOOK AT HOW TO MOTIVATE STUDENTS
Respect is power
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
The Five Powers of Leadership
1. Coercive (f)
2. Reward (f)
3. Legitimate (f)
Formal Power vs.
Personal Power
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
1. Coercive (f)
Power gained through threat or
fear.
2. Reward (f)
• “Get your grades up or I will
take the keys or cell phone.”
3. Legitimate (f)
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
• “Do your job or you will get
fired.”
• “Do your homework or you
won’t get a credit!”
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
1. Coercive (f)
Power conveyed through
reward.
2. Reward (f)
• “Do a good job and you
will get a bonus.”
3. Legitimate (f)
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
• “Work hard and you can
become CEO.”
• “Do you homework and I
will give you an A.”
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
1. Coercive (f)
Power that comes through
position in an organization.
2. Reward (f)
• “She is the principal, so I
trust she is right.”
3. Legitimate (f)
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
• “Well, he’s the PLC leader
so we’d better do it.”
• “My school counselor said
…”
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
1. Coercive (f)
Power gained because of your
expertise.
2. Reward (f)
• “He’s really good with
computers, I will listen to him.”
3. Legitimate (f)
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
• “My mom attended that college,
so she can tell us about it.”
• “My counselor said I should I
should try an AP course.
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
1. Coercive (f)
2. Reward (f)
3. Legitimate (f)
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
Power gained through trust and
respect.
• “They were there for me once
and now I’m going to help
them.”
• “I have always trusted their
judgment, and I am going to
support them .”
• “I like my counselor, and I am
going to take their advice.”
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
IT’S ALL ABOUT POWER
The Five Powers of Leadership
1. Coercive (f)
2. Reward (f)
3. Legitimate (f)
Formal Power vs.
Personal Power
4. Expert (p)
5. Referrant (p)
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
Real ways to help students
… in ten minutes or less.
Reality Therapy
• Originated in school environment. Frequently
recommended for School Counseling
• SIMPLE. Four Questions: What do you want? What
are you doing? Is what you are doing getting you
what you want? Do you want to figure out a better
way?
• Recognizes academic struggles result from
emotional disturbance, usually relationships
Reality Therapy
• What do you want?
Defining their quality world they aren’t getting.
• What are you doing?
Identifying behavior(s) preventing their quality world.
• Is what your are doing getting you your quality
world?
Helping clients understand they are choosing the results
by their behavior. (Choice Theory)
• Do you want to figure out a better way?
Let’s make a plan.
CONCLUSION
•
Students desire Boundaries
•
Reality Therapy: Good for School Counseling
•
Respect and Trust give Power
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
STUDENT OF TODAY
• 30 percent of college freshmen do not
complete their first year as expected.
• 50 percent of college students take
remediation courses.
• College Board reports only 43 percent of
2012 College-Bound Seniors are College
Ready.
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
5-year Old Entering Kindergarten Who Has
Been Play/Reading Yearly w/Adults For:
50 Hours
(2 min/day)
1800 Hours
(1 hour/day)
2000 Hours
(1.1 hour/day)
8-10,000 words
10-12,000 words
2,000 words
Growth
2,500 words
3,000 words
6,000 words
Child Enters 1st Grade
10,500 words
15,000 words
2,500 words
Growth
3,750 words
4,000 words
8,500 words
Child Enters 2nd Grade
14,225 words
19,000 words
4,000 or fewer words
3,000 words
11,500 words
Growth
4,500 words
Child Enters 3rd Grade
18,750 words
5,000 words
24,000 words
Developmentally Appropriate Education
Concrete Operational
Ages 7-11
• Very much rooted in their
world.
• Abstract thinking not
possible
• Fixates on the reality in
front of them.
• Can form concepts, see
relationships, and solve
problems as long as it
involves objects and
situations familiar to them.
•
•
Formal Operational
Ages 11 - Adulthood
• Can deal with hypothetical
situations.
• Can make sense of
concepts and situations they
have not experienced.
• Have ability to think
abstractly, test hypotheses,
and form concepts
independent of physical
reality: abilities necessary to
learn higher-order skills.
But, Concrete Operational can solve complex problems when presented in a simpler
way with simpler language. R. Gelman
Success on tasks ranges from 19-98 percent based upon complexity of instructions.
M.A. Boden.
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
THE REALITY WILL REMAIN
HAVE THE BEST CREDIT –RECOVERY
PROGRAM YOU CAN
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Summer School
Alternative Education
On-line Learning
School-in-a-School
Skill-building classes
Accountability Sessions
Howard, Jeff/IntClutt/March 2013
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