NCAA Clearing House
Understanding the Rules of
Eligibility
“How to get recruited?”
January 22nd 2009
Table of Contents
 What is the NCAA Clearinghouse?
 Schools Responsibility
 2008 Current Standards:
 Division I & Division II
 Core Classes
 Registering for the NCAA
 Parents Responsibility
NCAA Clearinghouse
 Money / TV Revenue. By the 1970’s and 1980’s big time college athletics became
a serious money maker for many Division I institutions. T.V. revenue and exposure
also made successful college athletics very important to school presidents.
 Admission into universities were subjective and there were students who were
playing sports for four years who were not capable of doing elementary school
reading and writing. This eventually brought disgrace to many universities and
forced the NCAA to intervene due to public pressure.
 In 1983 Prop 48 was proposed by members of the NCAA as a uniform way for all
players to play college athletics. There were three requirements:
1. 2.0 Cumulative average
2. 11 Core Classes
3. SAT 700 / ACT 15
 Players who failed to meet this initial qualification would be forced to sit out a year
and lose a season of eligibility. Players would only be eligible for 3 years instead of
four.
Test Scores
 Division I has a sliding scale for test score and grade-point average.
 Division II has a minimum SAT score requirement of 820 or an ACT sum
score of 68.
 The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading
and math sections. The writing section of the SAT is not used.
 The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the four sections on
the ACT: English, Math, Reading and Science.
 All SAT and ACT scores must be reported directly to the NCAA InitialEligibility Clearinghouse by the testing agency. Test scores that appear on
transcripts will no longer be used. When registering for the SAT or ACT,
use the clearinghouse code of 9999 to make sure the score is reported to the
clearinghouse
Grade Point Average
 Only core courses are used in the calculation of the grade-point average.
 Be sure to look at your high school’s list of NCAA-approved core courses
on the clearinghouse Web site to make certain that the courses being taken
have been approved as core courses.
 The Web site is: www.ncaaclearinghouse.net.
 Division I grade-point-average requirements are detailed on a sliding scale.
 The Division II grade-point-average requirement is a minimum 2.000.
Core Classes
DIVISION I
16 Core-Course Rule
DIVISION II
14 Core-Course Rule
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4 years of English.
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3 years of English.
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3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or
higher).
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2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or
higher).
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2 years of natural/physical science (1
year of lab if offered by high school).
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2 years of natural/physical science (1
year of lab if offered by high school).
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1 year of additional English,
mathematics or natural/physical
science.
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2 years of additional English,
mathematics or natural/physical
science.
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2 years of social science.
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2 years of social science.
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4 years of additional courses (from any
area above, foreign language or non
doctrinal religion/philosophy).
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3 years of additional courses (from
any area above, foreign language or
non doctrinal religion/philosophy).
Parent Responsibility
 Do not accept grades below a C in a core class. Make sure if they do get a D or
F, they repeat the class in summer school.
 Get a copy of their official transcript at the end of each year so you can
calculate their core GPA.
 Make sure your child takes the PSAT in 9th and 10th grade. In the fall of their
junior year have them take the SAT and ACT once each.
 In the spring of their junior year have them take the test one more time each.
 Finally take each test one more time (or more) during the fall of their senior
year. Hopefully by the time they are seniors they will have a comfortable GPA
so their test scores do not have to be too high.
 Meet with their coach on a yearly basis and discuss this with them as well.
 If you feel your child is a Division I or Division II athlete you should have a
meeting with that coach no later then the spring of their junior year.
 More questions go to www.ncaa.org or www.ncaaclearinghouse.net .
What is a Division I Football Player?
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Must dominate as a Sophomore and Junior. Hi-Lights should “Take your breath
away”.
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Schools (Virginia/Virginia Tech/Maryland/West Virginia) – Big Schools.
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Academically – Must qualify. Players with a low GPA will scare off any coaches.
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Character – Can not have a history of trouble (OSS/ISS)
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Skill Player – Should have plays that demonstrate the ability to score TD’s of 50
yards or more. Should have several (4,5,6) of them on their hi-light tape. Can not
get “Hawked”!!
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Can play multiple positions – RB/WR/CB/LB/PR/KR… If he is a D-IA player he
will dominate several positions.
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Lineman – If they are under 6’1” they had better RUN really well (4.6/4.7 range).
OL/DL Big/Physical and Fast. Many play basketball. Can dunk a basketball
(Shows power/explosive).
What is a Division I Football Player?
Continued ……
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From the 2008 season only 1 player in Stafford County is going D-IA
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Very often are genetic “freaks of nature” in the weight room and in running.
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Most Offers will come in the fall or spring of junior year. By the time a player
enters his senior year 85% of the I-A scholarships are offered.
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If a school really likes you they will invited you to their 1 day camp for free.
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Division IA players are “born” and not “made”.
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Johnny Jones – 6’4” 250 lbs. Ran a 4.55 forty and could do a 360 degree dunk!
He would eat chicken wings/pizza and cheese steaks every day. He HATED the
weight room (Worked out but not very often). Started for University of Pittsburgh
in the late 1990’s.
What is a Division IAA Football Player?
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Division I-AA (Richmond/JMU/William & Mary/Hampton)
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FCS (Football Championship Subdivision) =IAA
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63 Scholarships as opposed to 85 for D-IA
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D-IAA Schools are usually looking for players that slip through the I-A cracks.
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Very good academics (Many I-AA schools do not go off of the NCAA sliding scale
but instead use their own scale). You may qualify for the NCAA but schools like
JMU/Richmond and William & Mary have higher standards.
What is a Division IAA Football Player?
Continued ……
• These schools are looking for the players that slip through the D-IA cracks. Players
who just miss going to UVA & VA Tech. These players are also very dominant as
players (Usually first Team All Region and State/Player of the year in their district).
Skill players have to have very, very impressive tape (On par with D-IA). Lineman
as well.
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Think just one step shy of a D-IA player. This past year players like Chase Barnet
(Two time Player of the year and Two time All Region).
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Offers begin coming in the spring of your junior year. Continue through the
summer and the fall.
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If the school is interested they will invite you to their 1 day camp for free.
What is a Division II Football Player?
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Must be a very good football player (All district/All region).
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Academically 2.0 Core GPA – 820 SAT and 14 core classes (Lower standard then
the I-A)
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An example of schools (Shepherd/VA State/Virginia Union/Glenville St/Fairmont
St/Wingate). These schools are usually smaller.
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They only offer 36 scholarships but RARELY do they give them out as full
scholarships. Usually break them up into partials (1/2 and ¼). They have to be
creative.
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As with D-IA and D-IAA a D-II player has to demonstrate the ability to excel and
play at a high level. Most of these schools offer players who just miss I-AA offers.
With so few scholarships they also encourage more players to walk on and
eventually earn a scholarship.
What is a Division II Football Player?
Continued ….
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Player should dominate their position. Playing D-II is usually because of size (Skill
players under 5’11” who get overlooked by higher schools). Lineman under 6’2”
who get overlooked as well.
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Most D-II offers do not come in until January. They wait until after the D-IAA
schools are done and try and get the “leftovers”.
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Many schools try and combine athletic scholarships with academic money. Also try
and use financial aid as well.
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Many good D-II programs are just a step below many I-AA schools.
What is a Division III Football Player?
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Academics play a huge role here. According to the NCAA D-III schools are not
allowed to give out athletic scholarships thus they do not have to meet NCAA
standards.
Some schools have minimum standards (2.0 – 800 SAT) others are very demanding
(3.5 – 1100 SAT). At the D-III level the school can use their discretion in
acceptance.
Academic money can be offered (Combine GPA and SAT).
Good D-III schools recruit similar kids then D-II schools (CNU/Wesley/Mount
Union/Washington & Jefferson). These schools often are as good and beat some DII programs.
Player should excel at the high school level. Very often these players are smaller
(Skill players under 5’10” and Lineman under 6’2”). Usually a little slower. All
district 1st or 2nd Team. Should have hi-lights and clips that are exciting.
Financial Aid and Academic money will help with the cost of school.
What is Financial Aid?
Continued ……
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A family must qualify for aid. The Pell Grant and SEOG Grant are federally
funded. Students do NOT have to pay this money back (Up to $4,000.00). To
qualify for these two federal loans you generally have to have a family income
below $40,000.00. The term EFC (Estimated Family Contribution) is what the
federal government uses to determine your amount.
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Private Schools – Though they are more expensive they often offer grant money as
well (Money you do NOT have to pay back).
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Stafford Loan – Federal loan a student takes out and pays back after they graduate.
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$5,500 (for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008) if you're a first-year
student enrolled in a program of study that is at least a full academic year. No more
than $3,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.
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$6,500 (for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008) if you've completed your
first year of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic
year. No more than $4,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.
What is Financial Aid?
Continued ……
• $7,500 (for loans first disbursed on or after July 1, 2008) if you've completed two
years of study and the remainder of your program is at least a full academic year.
No more than $5,500 of this amount can be in subsidized loans.
•
PLUS Loan – Federal loan parents may take out and repay while students are in
school.
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Work Study – Job provided through the school (Library/Athletics/Cafe). Student
works for the school and gets a monthly check. This money can be used to pay
back school if needed.
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Academic Money – Partial and full academic scholarships are available too.
Example – Student has a 3.2 GPA and a 1100 SAT: School may give $5,0000.00 in
scholarship money yearly. Many D-III Schools use this as a tool when recruiting. I
will help you with this part of the process.
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Bottom line Financial aid is on a NEED basis. Besides scholarships you have to
qualify financially for aid. You must submit your FAFSA forms before March 15th.
You will use your current W-II forms when filling this out. The federal
government will assign you an EFC: Estimated Family Contribution. Once that
number is issued by the federal government the local colleges will use this to make
up your package.
Urban Myths & Untrue Facts!
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Combines – I do not recommend you send your child to this. They are a money
maker and they are not useful in getting your child recruited.
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VA Preps – VA Preps will have NO bearing on if your son will get a scholarship.
College coaches do not rely on this as a source of information. Most people on this
site are disgruntled players, coaches or parents.
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Exposure – You do not need to promote your son. Playing well is ALL of the
exposure you need. Also college coaches quite frankly do not want to hear form
you. I deal with over 40 colleges and universities on a yearly basis. I can send
your tape via mail and your web site if you have one. Since I have been coaching I
have sent players to all levels (IA, I-AA, II, III, Preps School and Junior College).
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Position – The position your son plays will not make an impact on weather he gets
a scholarship. If he is good enough he will stand out on tape.
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Internet – If I were you I would stay off of the internet and not worry about what
you read. Usually creates more problems.
Managing expectations for your son
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1st Team All District Offense
2nd Team All District Defense (Played both ways)
All County (Out of 25 Schools)
3rd Team All Southeastern PA (Including Philly and 6 other counties. Over 75
schools)
Led Team in tackles (94 & Sacks 10)
6’2” 225 lbs
5.1 Forty
My profile coming out of High School in 1992 (PA)
I was not contacted by any D-IA or IAA schools.
No Offers
Asked to walk on at West Chester State/Millersville and Mansfield. All PA D-II
teams. No scholarship offers.
Went to Wesley College. D-III program in DE. Qualified for financial aid. This is
a typical profile of a D-II & D-III player.
Managing expectations for your son
Continued …..
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First Team All State (VA) – RB
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First Team All NW Region – RB
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Cardinal District Offensive Player of the year – RB
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1st Team All MET Washington Post – Athlete
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Channel 4 Golden 11 (Washington Metro area) – RB
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Rushed for over 1500 yds in 10 games
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Had 7 runs of 50 yards or more for a TD – Senior year (This player NEVER was
caught from behind).
Managing expectations for your son
Continued ….
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6’2”
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210 lbs
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Bench Press – 305 lbs / Squat 425 lbs/Clean 285 lbs.
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Hand time 4.4 forty. Nike Combine 4.57 digital time.
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Had all of his offers in April and May of his Junior Year (Tennessee, VA Tech……).
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Played (RB/QB/WR/CB/F/S/OLB/DE/KR/PR)
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Savion Frazier - Currently on University of Tennessee’s roster. LB.
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This is the profile of a typical D-IA player (He was a 3 star recruit out of 5)
What can you expect from me?
 I will be the biggest advocate for your son. I will email, call and literally harass
schools for you.
 I will have DVD’s/Transcripts on file for your son. I distribute them to the coaches
when they come.
 If you have a web site I will send your link to all of the coaches in the area and
begin the process (I am currently doing that for two of our current juniors. They are
already getting feedback).
 I will give you advice and consent and what you need to do for your son.
 If you need to meet one on one and discuss further we can arrange a meeting as
well.
 Feel free contact me via email if you have concerns:
[email protected]
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NCAA Clearing House Understanding the Rules of …