UNDERSTANDING THE NCAA
CLEARINGHOUSE PROCESS
Marcus K. Lawrence
January 11, 2014
What is the NCAA Eligibility Center?
Why is it Important?
The NCAA Eligibility Center took over operations for the
NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse in November 2007.
The Eligibility Center certifies the academic and amateur
credentials of all students who want to play sports at an
NCAA Division I or II institution as freshmen. In order to
practice, play and receive an athletics scholarship,
students need to meet certain academic benchmarks.
An additional certification process exists to make sure
the student is still an amateur, which is necessary in
order for the student to compete.
Academic Credentials + Amateurism Status = College
Eligible
What are the Academic InitialEligibility Requirements?
The following requirements must be met in order for a student to be
able to practice, play and receive a scholarship at an NCAA Division I
or II college or university.
Division I:
1. Graduate from high school;
2. Complete a minimum of 16 core courses;
3. Present the required grade-point average (GPA) (see the sliding
scale in the Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete for
Division I);
4. Present a qualifying test score on either the ACT or SAT (see the
sliding scale in the Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete);
and
5. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request final
amateurism certification.
Division I Core-Course Breakdown
(Courses Must Appear on your List of Approved Core
Courses)
• 4 years of English
• 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
• 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year
of lab science if offered by your high school)
• 1 extra year of English, math, or natural or physical science
• 2 years of social science
• 4 years of extra core courses from any category above, or
foreign language, nondoctrinal/comparative
religion/philosophy
Division II
1. Graduate from high school;
2. Complete a minimum of 14 core courses (Note:
increase to 16 core courses for class of 2013 and
beyond);
3. Present a minimum 2.000 core-course grade-point
average (GPA);
4. Present a minimum 820 SAT score (critical reading
and math only) or 68 sum ACT score qualifying test
score on either the ACT or SAT; and
5. Complete the amateurism questionnaire and request
final amateurism certification.
Division II Core-Course Breakdown
(Courses Must Appear on your List of Approved Core
Courses)
• 3 years of English
• 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
• 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year
of lab science if offered by your high school);
• 2 additional years of English, math, or natural or physical
science (3 years required in 2013 and beyond)
• 2 years of social science
• 3 years of extra core courses from any category above, or
foreign language, nondoctrinal/comparative
religion/philosophy (4 years required in 2013 and beyond)
Understanding
Core Courses
What is a Core Course?
NCAA legislation guides the NCAA Eligibility Center staff in its review
of core courses. This legislation requires that a course meet the
following standards:
1.
A core course must be an academic course that receives high
school graduation credit in the following:
–
2.
3.
4.
5.
One or a combination of these areas: English, mathematics,
natural/physical science; social science, foreign language,
comparative religion or philosophy.
Four-year college preparatory;
At or above your high school’s regular academic level;
Algebra I or higher in the mathematics area; and
Taught by a qualified instructor.
What is NOT a Core Course ?
1. Courses in non-core areas or vocational courses: Driver’s
Ed, Keyboarding, Art, Music, Physical Education, Welding.
2. Courses that prepare students for the world of work or
life, or for a two-year college or technical school.
Examples include Personal Finance, Consumer Education,
Tech Prep.
3. Courses that are taught below grade level, at a slower
pace, with less rigor or depth. Examples include Basic,
Essential, Fundamental or Foundations courses.
4. Courses that are not academic in nature. Examples
include Film Study, Video Editing, Greenhouse
Management.
Additional Core Course Questions
What courses can be submitted in the “additional” core area?
• Courses in foreign/world languages, philosophy, comparative religion, or American sign language.
What courses should NOT be submitted as “additional” core courses?
• Miscellaneous non-academic courses such as physical education, leadership/community service,
driver’s education, weight lifting, study skills, marching band, software applications, etc.
What about fine arts courses?
• Courses in art, music, dance, or acting/theater cannot be approved as NCAA core courses in any
core area.
What about computer science courses?
• If the course (a) receives math or science graduation credit and (b) is an academic programming
course or an AP course, it should be submitted in the appropriate core area (math or science),
and not as an additional core course.
• If your school awards computer science courses technology credit only, the courses cannot be
approved in any NCAA core area.
• Courses in software applications, spreadsheets, website construction, keyboarding, computer
repair, or other tech-prep computer courses cannot be used as NCAA core courses
How Should
the Eligibility
Process
Work?
Grades 9 and 10
• Student takes academic college-preparatory
courses, preferably one in each of the
following areas: English, math, science, social
studies and foreign language. The student
should compare course selection against the
list of NCAA-approved core courses.
Grade 11
• Student continues to take college preparatory courses in
the areas listed above.
• Student registers for the SAT and/or ACT, making sure to
use code 9999 at the time of registration. Using code 9999
will ensure the score is reported directly to the Eligibility
Center.
• Student registers with the NCAA Eligibility Center and
completes both the academic information and the
amateurism questionnaire.
• At the end of the student’s sixth semester, the guidance
counselor sends the student’s transcript (or transcripts, if
more than one high school) to the Eligibility Center.
Grade 12
• Student continues to take college preparatory courses in
English, math, science, social studies and foreign
language.
• Student registers for additional ACT/SAT tests if necessary,
making sure to use code 9999 at the time of registration.
• On or after April 1 of the senior year, the student goes
back into their Eligibility Center account to update their
academic and amateurism information and request final
amateurism certification.
• After graduation, the guidance counselor sends the
student’s final transcript (which needs to include evidence
and the date that the student graduated) to the Eligibility
Center.
When Should Students Register?
Students may register at any time, but we recommend that they
register during their sophomore year. The registration website is
www.eligibilitycenter.org. The NCAA Eligibility Center will
evaluate a student’s academic credentials once the following
information has been received, and the student has had his/her
status requested by an NCAA member institution:
• Completed online registration;
• Fee payment;
• SAT and/or ACT test score on file from the respective testing
agency; and
• Transcript(s) from all schools or programs attended.
2016 NCAA
Division I
Initial-Eligibility
Academic
Requirements
NCAA Division I Initial-Eligibility
Academic Requirements
There are new requirements for college-bound
student-athletes enrolling full time at an NCAA
Division I college or university on or after
August 1, 2016.
Summary of Changes
• Minimum core-course GPA of 2.300 required for
competition;
• Ten core courses required before beginning of
senior year for competition; and
• Slight changes in GPA/test score index (sliding
scale).
The following slides explain these changes in
further detail.
NCAA Division I Initial-Eligibility
Academic Requirements (New)
For college-bound student-athletes enrolling full time
at an NCAA Division I college or university on or after
August 1, 2016, there are three possible academic
outcomes:
1. Full qualifier = competition, athletics aid (scholarship),
and practice the first year.
2. Academic redshirt = athletics aid the first year, practice in
first regular academic term (semester or quarter).
3. Nonqualifier = no athletics aid, practice or competition
the first year.
NCAA Division I Full Qualifier:
Requirements for Athletics Aid, Practice and Competition
Students will need to meet the following requirements to receive athletics aid,
practice and compete their first year:
•
16 core courses in the following areas:
–
–
–
–
–
–
•
4 years English;
3 years math at Algebra I level or higher;
2 years natural or physical science (one lab if offered at any high school attended);
1 year additional English, math or natural/physical science;
2 years social science; and
4 years additional from areas above or foreign language, philosophy or comparative religion.
Minimum required GPA:
– Minimum GPA of 2.300 required for competition in those 16 core courses.
•
Graduate from high school.
NCAA Division I Full Qualifier:
Requirements for Athletics Aid, Practice and
Competition
• Core-course progression.
– Must complete 10 core courses before seventh
semester of high school (e.g., senior year).
– Of the 10 core courses completed, seven must be in
the area of English, math, or science.
– These 10 core courses become “locked in” for the
purpose of core-course GPA calculation.
• A repeat of one of the “locked in” courses will not be used
if taken after the seventh semester begins
Academic Redshirt: Requirements for
Scholarship and Practice
Requirements for Scholarship and Practice.
• 16 core courses in the following areas:
–
–
–
–
–
–
•
4 years English,
3 years math at Algebra I level or higher,
2 years natural or physical science (one lab if offered by any school attended);
1 year additional English, math or natural/physical science;
2 years social science; and
4 years additional from areas above or foreign language, philosophy or comparative religion.
Minimum required GPA.
– Minimum GPA of 2.000-2.299 in 16 core courses.
•
Sliding scale.
– Minimum ACT sum or SAT score (critical reading/math only) that matches the 16 corecourse GPA.
Academic Redshirt: Requirements for
Scholarship and Practice
Student-athletes who fail to meet the required 10 core
courses prior to the start of the seventh semester (seven
of which must be in English, math, or natural or physical
science), will be allowed to retake core courses in the
seventh or eighth semester, which will be used in their
academic certification for the purpose of meeting
the academic redshirt requirements.
Academic Redshirt: Requirements for
Scholarship and Practice
If a college-bound student-athlete meets these
requirements, he/she can receive an athletics
scholarship during his/her first year at an NCAA Division
I college or university.
After the first term is complete, the student-athlete
must be academically successful (successfully
completing nine semester hours or eight quarter hours
in each applicable term) at his/her college or university
to continue to practice for the remainder of the year.
What If A Student Does Not
Meet Either Set of Requirements?
If a college-bound student-athlete does not meet either
set of requirements, he/she is a nonqualifier.
A nonqualifier:
• Cannot receive athletics aid during the first year at an
NCAA Division I college or university.
• Cannot practice or compete during the first year at a
Division I college or university.
Next Steps
Visit the Eligibility Center Website
www.eligiblitycenter.org
Follow the Steps for the College
Bound Athlete and Register
Summary
In order to participate in Division I or II collegiate
athletics you must:
• Meet the requirements under amateurism and
academic credentials.
• Have the appropriate core grade point average
and corresponding score on the sliding SAT/ACT
scale.
• Officially register through the NCAA Eligibility
Center with all of the supporting documents
QUESTIONS?
Resources
• www.eligiblitycenter.org
• www.nfhslearn.com
• www.2point3.org
Contact Information
Marcus K. Lawrence, M.Ed.
College & Career Counselor
Head Coach, Boys Varsity Basketball
Stonewall Jackson High School
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 703.365.2992
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Understanding the NCAA Clearinghouse Process