Curriculum Alignment at
Queen Elizabeth High School
A Brief Introduction
Monday November 17, 2003
by Mr. Wayne Lincoln
Purpose of the session
To begin the
conversation around
curriculum alignment, to
provide some opportunities
for reflection, and to examine
what alignment of a unit
might look like in an African
Canadian Studies 11 class.
2
What are your own thoughts on
curriculum alignment and what does
it mean to you?
 1.Take a couple of minutes and put
your ideas on paper.
 2. Share your thoughts with your colleagues who
are in close proximity to you.
3
Now, what are you really
thinking?
a) This too shall pass.
b) Fasten your seatbelts!
c) Do we really have to?
d) Collaborative sigh.
e) Something else for
teachers to make
successful.
f) All of these
4
Something to reflect upon…
“Most high-performing schools simply reflect the
social capital of their students (they are primarily
schools with students of high socioeconomic
status) , rather than the internal capacity of the
schools themselves. Most low-performing schools
cannot rely on the social capital of students and
families and instead must rely on their
organizational capacity.”
Elmore, R.F. (2002). Harvard Magazine, Vol 105,
(1) September-October 2002, p.35. Retrieved
05/11/2003 http://www.harvardmagazine.com/online/0902140.html
5
What is Curriculum Alignment?
 Educational theorists and scholars such as
Beverly Freedman, former Superintendent
of Educational Programs, Durham (Ontario)
Board of Education, who will be working
with HRSB staff, have suggested that
curriculum alignment refers to a process of
organizing instruction into units that are
aligned with the written curriculum and
student assessment.
6
WRITTEN CURRICULUM
(TARGETS)
STUDENT
ACHIEVEMENT
ASSESSED
CURRICULUM
TAUGHT
CURRICULUM
Halifax Regional School Board: Outcomes – Based Student Assessment
7
What Curriculum Alignment is
not!
Superficial alignment
i.e. Checking off any
outcomes we may
happen to have
covered.
8
Curriculum Alignment …
 levels the playing field for students as it ensures that everyone has to
meet the same outcomes e.g. “is this going to be on the test ?”or “I
want to be in her class.” or “this is how I understand the outcome so
this is what I am going to teach.”
 is about accountability, responsibility, and quality control.
 will be imposed on us if we are not proactive .
 does not mean that we are not doing our jobs effectively.
 will rely on administration and teachers to make it work.
 may already be in the implementation phase in some classrooms.
 is not new.
9
Why is Curriculum Alignment so
important?
1. We need to be more concerned with what
students have learned as a result of their
schooling experience than with what they
know and can do regardless of the source
of that knowledge or those skills.
2. Proper curriculum alignment enables us to
understand the differences in the effects of
schooling on student achievement.
10
Why is Curriculum Alignment so
Important?
3. Poorly aligned curriculum results in our
underestimating the effect of instruction
on learning.
4. Concern for educational accountability.
From:
Anderson, L.W. (2002) Curricular Alignment:
A Re:Examination, Theory Into Practice,
41(4), p. 259
11
Furthermore, Baratz-Snowden (1993) in
Anderson (2002) contends:
“If students are to be held
accountable for their
learning, then schools
must be held accountable
as well by demonstrating
that they provide students
with opportunities to learn
to meet the standards
[outcomes] that have been
set” (p. 317)
12
Critics of Curriculum Alignment (CA)
such as Wraga (1999) argue:
 Underlying
 CA is all about what is
taught and no
assumptions of equity
consideration is given
and accountability are
to how students are
problematic
taught
 CA validates “teaching
 CA demands
to the test” and
compliance while
promotes greater
ignoring the teacher’s
reliance on high stakes role as curriculum
testing
developer & impact on
student learning
13
However, Glatthorn (1999) contends:
In a time of mandated standards[outcomes]
and high-stakes tests, ignoring the need for
alignment is foolish at best. The issue is not
“Should we align?” Rather, it is “ How can
we align so that the alignment is teacherdirected and teacher-friendly?”
14
Principles of Learning from NS
Public School Program
 Active construction of
 Learning as integrated
knowledge
 Construction and
meaningfulness of
knowledge in terms of
prior knowledge and
experiences
 Social and
collaborative
environment
whole
 Learners see
themselves as capable
and successful
 Different ways of
learning &
representing
 Reflection is key to
learning
15
How might these principles impact on
planning units and lessons in my African
Canadian Studies 11 class?
1.
2.
3.
My class would have to be more activity-based
with activities carefully planned to meet
outcomes-see curriculum documents.
I would have to have knowledge of the prior
experiences (e.g. collaborate with prior teachers,
engage in discussions with students).
I would have to plan for my environment to be a
social and collaborative space for my students.
16
Impact on instructional planning
4.
5.
6.
7.
I would have to explore connections with other subject
disciplines- –English, languages mathematics, sciences,
art, music, social studies.
I would have to plan instructional events which would
enable students to have opportunities for success e.g
write a poem, role play a situation, make up a rap song
and perform it, depict the life of Black Nova Scotian
loyalists in a drawing.
I would have to more accepting of different learning
styles and ways of representing, not just the ones I
prefer.
I would have to provide opportunities for student
reflection e.g. journalling, portfolios – i.e. data
collection, and tap into the knowledge gained.
17
An example of Curriculum Alignment in
ACS11
With the 7 principles (construct, prior,
environment, integrated, capable, different ways,
reflection) in the back of my mind, I would ask
myself :
What are the big ideas I want my students to
take away from this unit or lesson?
Which of the Essential Graduation Learnings
apply?
What is the General Curriculum Outline for this
unit/lesson?
18
ACS11 example
 What is(are) the Specific Curriculum
Outcome(s) or targets I want students to hit?
 How will I assess to ensure the target is met
i.e what kinds of evidence and how much
must I collect?
 How will I plan for this unit?
 How will information be communicated
back to the student and the parent?
19
Reflection Activity
 Please take 5 – 10 minutes and complete the
handout .
 Try to work without consulting a fellow
staff member.
 Please be candid about your assessment and
instructional practices.
20
BI’s
EGL’s
PoL’s
GMI’s
Aesthetic
Express’n
Actively
Construct
Linguistic
Citizenshp Prior
Experienc
LogicalMathemat
Commun
Social &
Collabor
Spatial
Personal
Develop
Integrated
Whole
BodilyKinesthet
Problem
Solving
Capable & Musical
Successful
Technolog Diff ways
Competen Learn &
rep
AP’s
IP’s
Interpersn
________
Intrapersn
Reflection Naturalist
21
So what’s the point?
 Big ideas and essential understandings are
what our courses are about.
 They frequently overlap with Essential
Graduation Learnings i.e what the
Department expects us to accomplish.
 It is important for us to have a clear picture
of where we are headed in order for our
students to understand our expectations.
22
So what’s the point?
 Have we taken ownership of the EGL’s or do we
view it as an imposition from above?
 Do we believe in the Principles of Learning and if
so have we incorporated them into our
instructional plan? If we do not believe in them,
why not?
 Do we really believe in MI theory or is it a case of
“been there, done that and got the T-shirt?”
 Is there evidence of MI theory in our classes?
23
Framework for unit or lesson planning
promoting Curriculum Alignment
E ssential G raduation Learnings
B ig or E nduring Ideas
G eneral Curriculum O utcom es
S pecific Curriculum O utcom es
or Targets
A ssessm ent P lan
S em ester-long
Instructional P lan
Unit and lesson plans
S chool P lan
P lan for Com m unicating Learning
Teacher's P lan
24
Origins of Curriculum Alignment
 Standards movement in U.S. which grew
out of calls for greater accountability in the
public educational system.
 Curriculum Alignment Project Los Angeles
Unified School District 1979-1982 grades
3-6 with substantive success for
marginalized students.
 Calls for curriculum alignment in Canada
with the accountability movement.
25
Origins of Curriculum Alignment
 Curriculum Alignment in HRSB
(2002-2003) arises from the need to Plan For
Improvement (PFI) as HRSB establishes its
vision to become the most improved school
board in Canada in the next five years in
terms of measurable achievement targets
guided by the principles:
Every child can learn
All schools can improve
26
What might an aligned unit in
ACS11 look like?
e.g. Unit VI – Journey to Empowerment
 GCO –Students will investigate the importance of
collective consciousness of peoples of African
descent as a strategy for empowerment.
 I interpret this to mean that students have to study
how African Canadians/African Nova Scotians
collectively have been able to empower
themselves in the context of the larger, dominant
Euro-Canadian society.
27
What are the big ideas (essential
questions) that I want my ACS students
to take away from this unit?
 What is collective




consciousness and why is
it of particular importance
to peoples of African
descent?
What is empowerment &
disempowerment?
What kinds of
empowerment exist?
How would you empower
yourself and your
community?
Afrocentricity v
Eurocentricity.
 How would you meet the
challenges of societal
forces and institutions that
combine to disempower
you?
 What have individual African
Canadians/Nova Scotians done
to empower themselves?
 What has been done elsewhere
in the world and with what
results?
 Spirit, Survival, Strength.
28
What are the SCO’s (targets)?
 Examine concept of
 Explain how community-
based groups/grassroots
empowerment with
organizations have
examples.
developed & changed
 Examine empowerment
over time (NSAACP,
model & impact through
AUBA, BUF, BEA…).
institutional change.
 Examine contributions &
 Investigate global impact
achievements of African
of political empowerment
Canadian/NS men &
& independence of
women in social,
colonized countries 1950’s
educational, political,
to present.
religious , & judicial
 Discuss some of
institutions.
challenges facing African
 Analyse rel among
Cdn/NS today.
descendents of the
diaspora & people from
African continent.
29
What skills & knowledge are required to
meet the targets?
 Reading and writing skills
 Analytical skills & competence with
technology
 Problem solving skills
 Critical thinking skills
 Ability to research & present
 Knowledge about power & power structures
 Knowledge about the experiences of ANS
30
How might I integrate technology
into this unit on empowerment?
 Use a webquest for some
 Pair Euro-Canadian
of the community-based
groups.
 Post course syllabus with
calendar on QEH website.
 Work with CRS/TITL
teachers to help students
design websites on
contributions &
achievements of AC/NS
men & women.
 Powerpoint presentations.
students with African
Nova Scotian students to
communicate via
student.ednet email on
issues of empowerment.
 Use the www to research
the global impact of
independence from
colonial countries and to
gain a perspective from
African electronic media.
31
What might my Assessment Plan look
like?
Formal:
 End of unit test
 Case study Inglewood
 Visual representation
of work done by
community-based
groups/grassroots
organizations
 Reflection on video
 In-class assignments
Informal:
 Brief oral reports on
readings & research
on African Cdn/NS
men & women
 Journal
 Portfolio (selfassessment)
32
What results would I want to see from
my assesment plan?
I would be looking for clear evidence that the
SCO’s i.e. targets have been met and that students
have a good understanding of the big ideas and are
able to respond to the essential questions in the
unit.
Students would be involved in developing the
rubrics for all assessment events and would have
input in the composition of the test i.e. selected,
constructed, and extended response questions.
Results may lead to reteaching, varying
instructional strategies, reallocation of time,
varying assessment strategies.
33
Unit planning--Empowerment










Time frame 4-5 weeks.
Concept of empowerment with examples-2
Empowerment model (CAAA) & impact-3
Global impact of empowerment & indep-2
Development & change of community groups-3
Contributions & achievements of African Canadians/Nova
Scotians-3
Challenges facing African Nova Scotians-3
Relationships among descendents of the diaspora & people
from the African continent-2
Testing, video, computer lab & library time-5
Total # classes = 23
34
Materials/Resources needed for the unit
 Text(s) & Supp readings
 Guest speaker(s)
 Photocopy resources
 Contact partner school
 Computer in class & LCD
with ANS community as
feeder community
 Librarian/tech human
resources, on-line
resources, & time




projector & ext cord
TV/VCR & screen
O/H Projector
CRS Lab & CRS Teacher
Time
HRSB TITL access
35
How will I make provisions for adaptations,
MI, learning styles, & diverse abilities?
 Use of O/H & TV/VCR
for more visual learners.
 Use of small-group
cooperative learning
situations for interpersonal and logicalmathematical
intelligences.
 Field trip to Black
Cultural Centre for bodilykinesthetic, naturalist &
visual-tactile learners.
 Texts & readings for




linguistic intelligences.
Music & poetry for
musical & linguistic
intelligences.
Refer to Tanya MacNeil’s
(MHS) document on IPP’s
& Adaptations.
Reflections, journals,
portfolios for intrapersonal
intelligence.
Use of technology for
diverse abilities.
36
How will information be communicated
back to the student & parent?
 Informal
conversations with
students inside or
outside of the
classroom.
 Through assessments
& rubrics.
 Random telephone
calls or emailsbalanced i.e. not just
negative calls.
37
Thank you for your
participation.
Descargar

Curriculum Alignment at Queen Elizabeth High School