Tractor Rollovers and Run Overs
Can you prevent one on your farm?
1
Background
Tractor rollovers and run overs:
• Are not common accidents.
• Have a high potential for causing
death or disabling injury when they
do occur.
• Prevention efforts have a high
“pay back” value.
2
Research
The Injury Surveillance Program
reports that tractor rollovers and
run overs result in:
• 30 deaths
• 75 hospitalized injuries
on farms on average, every year.
3
Are accidents “accidental”?
• Accidents viewed as:
– “freak events”
– result of “carelessness”
• Research has shown that
accidents:
– have identifiable risk
factors
– are predictable
– are preventable
• Terminology change:
– “incidents”
4
Accident/incident analysis
• Immediate cause
• Possible contributing factors
– Human
– Mechanical
– Environmental
• Basic, “systemic” cause
• What one thing could prevent a
similar incident?
5
Case studies
• Modeled on tractor fatalities that occurred
on farms.
• Basic circumstances of an actual incident
are depicted.
• Name of victim, date and location of
incident, tractor make/model are fictitious.
6
Case study 1
• Orville, age 69
• Died October 4, 1990
• Incident:
Ground-starting
tractor, run over,
crushed.
7
Case study 1: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
8
Case study 2
• Marc, age 18
• Died August 28, 1995
• Incident:
Towing heavy load
downhill lost control
of tractor, sideways
rollover, crushed.
9
Case study 2: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
10
Case study 3
• George, age 49
• Died September 28,
1996
• Incident:
Fell off tractor, run
over.
11
Case study 3: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
12
Case study 4
• Carl, age 3
• Died June 25, 1993
• Incident:
Blind runover by lawn
tractor.
13
Case study 4: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
14
Case study 5
• Gerry, age 53
• Died July 15, 1992
• Incident:
Knocked off tractor by
a tree branch, run over.
15
Case study 5: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
16
Case study 6
• Luis, age 25
• Died April 30, 1994
• Incident:
Sideways tractor
rollover off ramp,
crushed.
17
Case study 6: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
18
Case study 7
• Donna, age 38
• Died March 28, 1994
• Incident:
Front end loader
imbalance, backward
tractor rollover,
drowned.
19
Case study 7: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
20
Case study 8
• Gilles, age 12
• Died April 5, 1991
• Incident:
Using tractor to tow
out stuck vehicle,
backward rollover,
crushed.
21
Case study 8: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
22
Case study 9
• Ashley, age 5
• Died May 23, 1992
• Incident:
Extra rider fell from
tractor cab, run over.
23
Case study 9: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
24
Case study 10
• Don, age 31
• Died May 4, 1995
• Incident:
Dismounted running
tractor, run over.
25
Case study 10: Incident analysis
• What was the immediate cause of the
incident?
• What were possible contributing factors?
• What one thing could prevent a similar
incident?
26
Overall quiz score
• With each case study, you
tested your knowledge
about safe tractor
operation by answering
quiz questions.
• Now add up your scores
for the ten quizzes for an
overall quiz score.
27
Personal Risk Profile
• Determining factors:
– Knowledge (quiz score)
– Sex, age
– Province of residence
– Tractor operation hours/year
– Condition of tractor
– Condition of operator
– Work practices
– Safety perceptions
28
Personal Risk Profile Scoring
• 85 – 100%
RISK: LOW
“Stay alert and keep up the good work”
• 70 – 84%
RISK: LOWER THAN AVERAGE,
BUT CAN BE IMPROVED
“Can you afford to risk your life or the life
of someone else?”
• 50 – 69%
RISK: SIGNIFICANT
“You are taking a gamble with your life or
the life of someone else.”
• < 50%
RISK: HIGH
“You are endangering your life or the life of
someone else.”
29
Conclusion
• It takes more than luck
to prevent a tractor
rollover or run over.
• But you can do it!
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Tractor Rollovers and Run Overs