DO NOW:
Day One
1)
Don’t forget that we changed seats on Friday.
Make sure you sit in your new seat. If you
weren’t here on Friday or forgot where you
sit, look at the seating chart on the board.
2)
Copy down your HW., & take a Do Now from
the middle of your table.
3)
Using your Do Now (half sheet in basket),
answer questions #1 – 5 INDEPENDENTLY!
Put this handout in the grammar section of
your binder. (page five)
Learning Goals:
• Critically take Cornell notes and
participate in class discussion during an
overview of Types of Sentences (fragments
vs. simple sentences & clauses).
• Classify a sentence as a group based on
its subject and verb to determine whether it
is a fragment or simple sentence.
CORNELL NOTES PAGE
Take a Cornell notes page from the middle
of your table. (page 6)
What does sentence structure matter to a
reader or writer?
TYPES OF SENTENCES:
SUBJECTS & VERBS
-In order to fully understand the difference
between a fragment and a simple
sentence, we need to review what
constitutes a SUBJECT and a VERB.
SUBJECTS
A subject of a sentence is a:
• NOUN - person, place, thing, or idea
• PRONOUN – non-specific word that
replaces a noun
•
The subject is who or what does the verb
•
•
Mrs. Stoller assigns us homework.
She assigns us homework.
VERBS
-The action that is being performed by the
subject.
•
STRONG VERBS – tells what the subject is
doing
•
LINKING/HELPING VERBS – what we know as
“weak” verbs (is, are, were)
•
Linking verbs connect the subject to something that is
said about the subject.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmkciQe32uQ
•
Helping verbs help the verb do its job.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-e10jJmdTA8
Ex: Ron's bathroom is a disaster.
Strong Verbs vs. Weak Verbs
HTTPS://WWW.YOUTUBE.COM
/WATCH?V=AZHCHOZDGDU
NOUN
PRONOUN
STRONG VERB
LINKING/HELPING VERB
FRAGMENTS
A fragment is formed when:
 a subject is missing
 a verb is missing
 a complete thought is not
expressed
SIMPLE SENTENCE
• has one subject-verb pair and
expresses a complete thought
http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=schoolhouse+rock+commas&ei=UTF
-8&fr=w3i&type=W3i_DS,202,0_0,Search,20140416,20034,0,87,0
The Tale of Mr. Morton
• Mrs. Stoller emphatically teaches
us how to vary our sentence
structure.
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES –
 Create your own sentence
fragment and give a reason why it
is incomplete.
 Create your own simple sentence.
Label the subject-verb pair.
Fragments and Verbs
Two pages (double-sided)
Evens only
HOMEWORK
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
On your Cornell Notes page, follow the directions below for
each line.
S
V
She went to the concert
Since she went to the concert
V
S
1) Label the subject (S) and verb (V) in each line.
2) Are both complete sentences? Explain why or why not.
3) Label your CN – page 8 – Day 2. Add it to your TOC 
Do Now
Day Two
Review of homework
Take out last night’s homework and a green or
red pen. From now on, you should have a green
pen with you at all times!
 Check your work against the answer key.
 Put a question mark by any questions you got
incorrect and don’t understand why you got
them incorrect.
 I will answer ALL questions after we go over all
of the homework!
 I provided answers for all of the questions even
though you just needed to complete the odds. I
did this in case you decided to do extra work –
NOT for you to copy the answers!
Learning Goals:
•
Critically take Cornell notes and participate
in class discussion during an overview of Types
of Sentences (two types of clauses).
•
Classify an independent and dependent
clause.
•
Classify compound subjects, compound
predicates, and compound subjects and
predicates.
•
Recognize Prepositions and Prepositional
Phrases
CORNELL NOTES PAGE
Take a Cornell notes page from the middle
of your table.
What does sentence structure matter to a
reader or writer?
TYPES OF SENTENCES:
What is a CLAUSE?
A clause is a group of words with
its own subject and verb.
*The subject is performing the verb
S
V
Ex> Joe ran home.
Two Kinds of Clauses
•
An independent clause is a
subject/verb group that forms
a complete sentence.
•
A dependent (or subordinate)
clause is a subject/verb group
that depends on more [an
independent clause] to make it
a complete sentence.
The Sentence Tree
CLAUSE
a group of words with its own subject and verb
DEPENDENT CLAUSE
INDEPENDENT CLAUSE
Adjective Clause
SIMPLE SENTENCE
Adverb Clause
Note: A dependent clause that
stands alone, can sometimes be
referred to as a fragment
because it doesn’t express a
complete thought!
SIMPLE SENTENCE!
S
V
Sally eats breakfast with her mom.
1 – independent clause
1
PREPOSITIONS
Prepositions show relationships between
things, function as connectors, and express
the link between separate items, such as
their relative location or direction.
FIFTY COMMON PREPOSITIONS
About
Behind
During
Off
To
Above
Below
Except
On
Toward
Across
Beneath
For
Onto
Under
After
Beside
From
Opposite
Underneath
Against
Besides
In
Out
Until
Along
Between
Inside
Outside
Up
Among
Beyond
Into
Over
Upon
Around
But
Like
Past
Within
At
By
Near
Since
Within
Before
Down
Of
Through
Without
PREPOSITIONAL PHRASES
A preposition in a sentence always introduces a
prepositional phrase.
A group of words that begins with a preposition and ends
with a noun or pronoun.
– The noun or pronoun following the preposition is the object of the
preposition – NOT the subject of the sentence!
What is the prepositional phrase in this sentence?
On the roof, the man placed the telescope.
On the roof = NOT a clause
Why? = The roof cannot be the subject of the sentence
because the roof is not doing anything, nor is anything being
done to the roof. Therefore, it is NOT a fragment because
there is NO subject or verb!
Remember…. A fragment MUST have a subject OR a verb
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byszemY8Pl8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idJYhjGyWTU
COMPOUND SUBJECTS
-when more than one noun or pronoun
forms the subject and is linked to the
SAME verb
1) Jack and Jill fell down.
2) History and math are my favorite
subjects.
3) Kayla and her mom shopped all day.
4) Inspire, Alpha, and Quest will compete.
COMPOUND PREDICATE
-when more than one verb is linked
to the SAME subject
1) Jack fell down and broke his leg.
2) History informs and helps us.
3) Kayla shopped and then slept today.
4) The middle school teams will race,
compete, and cheer.
COMPOUND SUBJECT &
PREDICATE
-when more than one noun or pronoun
is linked to more than one verb
1) Jack and Jill fell down and broke their legs.
2) Math and history inform and help us.
3) Kayla and her mom shopped and then slept
today.
4) Alpha, Inspire, and Quest will race, compete,
and cheer.
S
S S
V
V
Sally and Bob cook dinner and draw.
1 – independent clause
1
SIMPLE SENTENCE!
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES,
write a sentence with:
A single subject and single
predicate
A compound subject
A compound predicate
CHALLENGE: compound subject
and compound predicate
LABEL the subjects and verbs
17.1– odds only
19.3 (Practice 1 & 2) – odds only
Simple Sentence Practice (extra)
HOMEWORK
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
DO NOW:
1)
Copy down HW.
Day Three
Make sure your name is
on the Parts of Speech
Handout. Leave it on
your desk, and I will
collect it.
2) Complete the Do Now from your table
to practice identifying clauses.
independent clause, dependent clause,
not a clause, fragment
Do Now CHECK: Check the answers on your
homework with the answers on the white board
on the next slide 
How did you do? Rate yourself (1 – 5)
1. the singer was terrific
2. the guitar player
Independent clause
Fragment
3. even though we liked the music
4. when the curtain closed
Dependent clause
5. in the middle of the song
6. played for hours
Dependent clause
Not a clause
Fragment
7. the crowd clapped for an encore
Independent clause
8. because the band played and performed so well
Dependent clause
Review of homework
Take out last night’s homework and a green.
 Check your work against the answer key.
 Put a question mark by any questions you got
incorrect and don’t understand why you got
them incorrect.
 I will answer ALL questions after we go over all
of the homework!
 I provided answers for all of the questions even
though you just needed to complete the odds. I
did this in case you decided to do extra work –
NOT for you to copy the answers!
17.1
19.3 – Practice 1
19.3 – Practice 2
Exercises 1 & 2
19.3 – Practice 2
Exercise 3
Simple Sentence Practice
Extra Practice
In the late 1940’s, a new style of jazz emerged, known as cool
jazz. A
Miles Davis and other young musicians were influenced by and
adopted this new style. D
Their approach to cool jazz blended strong rhythms with flowing
melodies. A
The musicians used softer tones, syncopation, and a more even
beat than other jazz players. A
Cool-jazz players also created complex harmonies and
experimented on new instruments. C
For the first time, cellos, flutes, and tubas were featured in jazz
performances. B
Some music critics objected to the new style and wrote
negative reviews. C
Jazz concerts became more popular than ever before. A
Learning Goals:
 Critically take Cornell notes and participate in
class discussion during an overview of Types
of Sentences (complex sentences – adverb
clauses).
 Work as a group to match a dependent or
independent clause with another to form a
properly punctuated complex sentence.
NOT A CLAUSE
DEPENDENT
CLAUSE
INDEPENDENT
CLAUSE
MORE THAN ONE
CLAUSE
CORNELL NOTES PAGE
Take a Cornell notes page from the middle
of your table.
What does sentence structure matter to a
reader or writer?
TYPES OF SENTENCES:
Classifying Sentences
NUMBER of clauses
KINDS of clauses
Two Types of Clauses
Adverb Clauses:
– A subordinate clause that modifies a
verb, an adjective, or an adverb
– A subordinating conjunction always
introduces the adverb clause.
– Where will I see the subordinating
conjunction?
At the beginning when an adverb clause
begins the sentence.
In the middle, connecting the independent
clause to the subordinate clause.
http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=schoolhouse+rock+adverb+clauses&ei=
UTF-8&fr=w3i&type=W3i_DS,202,0_0,Search,20140416,20034,0,87,0
Subordinating Conjunctions
A.K.A. RED FLAG WORDS
BEGIN a dependent clause
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
WHENEVER
AFTER
DURING
WHILE
BECAUSE
IF
WHEN
SINCE
•
•
•
•
•
•
ALTHOUGH
EVEN THOUGH
UNTIL
UNLESS
BEFORE
THOUGH
And on and on…
http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=schoolhouse+rock+subordinate+conj
unctions&ei=UTF8&fr=w3i&type=W3i_DS,202,0_0,Search,20140416,20034,0,87,0
COMPLEX SENTENCE
S
V
S
V
While Naomi reads, Seth distracts
her.
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
2
composed of ONE dependent clause and
ONE independent clause
What if we reverse the clauses?
S
V
S
V
Katie dances while Marcia texts.
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
COMPLEX SENTENCE!
2
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES,
write complex sentences with:
• An adverb clause and an independent
clause where the adverb clause comes
first.
• An independent clause and an adverb
clause where the independent clause
comes first.
• LABEL the subjects and verbs
WATCH YOUR COMMA PLACEMENT!
20.2 Adverb Clauses – Whole Page
HOMEWORK
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
Homework check
Take out last night’s homework –
[20.2 – Adverb Clauses and a green pen
Check your homework and put a ? Mark
next to anything you don’t understand!
DO NOW:
Day Four
20.2– Exercise 1
20.2– Exercise 2
CORNELL NOTES PAGE
What does sentence structure matter to a
reader or writer?
Learning Goals:
 Critically take Cornell notes and participate in
class discussion during an overview of Types
of Sentences (complex sentences – adjective
clauses).
 Work as a group to match a dependent or
independent clause with another to form a
properly punctuated complex sentence.
Second Type of Clause
Adjective Clauses:
– A subordinate clause that modifies a
noun or pronoun
– MOST adjective clauses begin with the
words:
Also
known as
relative
pronouns
That
Which
Who
Whom
Whose
A.K.A. RED FLAG WORDS
http://www.schooltube.com/vid
eo/964198d6a8d99911f4dc/Sc
hool-House-Rock-Unpack-YourAdjectives-Grammar-Rock
– Sometimes they begin with an adverb,
such as since, where, or when
COMPLEX SENTENCE
S
S
V
The man who robbed the bank
was caught today.
V
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
composed of ONE dependent clause and
ONE independent clause
2
COMPLEX SENTENCE
S
S
V
Sam Spider, who robbed the bank,
was caught today.
V
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
2
composed of ONE dependent clause and ONE
independent clause
COMPLEX SENTENCE
S
S
V
The pizza which was covered with
pepperoni tasted delicious.
V
2
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
composed of ONE dependent clause and
ONE independent clause
COMPLEX SENTENCE
S
S
V
Domino’s pizza, which was covered
with pepperoni, tasted delicious.
V
1 – dependent clause
1 – independent clause
composed of ONE dependent clause and
ONE independent clause
2
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES,
write a complex sentence with:
An adjective clause that is
essential to the sentence
An adjective clause that is not
essential to the sentence
LABEL the subjects and verbs
WATCH YOUR COMMA PLACEMENT!
20.2 Adjective Clauses – evens only
26.2 – Commas – odds only
HOMEWORK
HTTP://SEARCH.YAHOO.COM/SEARCH?P=SCHOOLHOUSE+ROCK+SUBORDI
NATE+CONJUNCTIONS&EI=UTF8&FR=W3I&TYPE=W3I_DS,202,0_0,SEARCH,20140416,20034,0,87,0&VM=R
BEGIN AT 1:37 (SUBORDINATING CONJUNCITONS)
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
DO NOW:
Day Five
1)
Copy down HW.
2)
Take a Do Now from your table and label each
line with either simple sentence, dependent
clause, complex, fragment, or not a clause .
Label your subjects and verbs!
3)
Take a Cornell Notes Sheet, and be prepared
to take Cornell Notes for “Types Of
Sentences: Compound Sentences.”
1. Team Inspire has the best seventh grade teachers
simple = independent clause
2. Because Mr. Sidler coaches and teaches he is a busy man
complex - adverb and independent clause
3. Ms. Sarcone loves to sing even though she has a terrible voice
complex – adverb and independent clause
4. Mrs. Heyl is an active runner when she is not teaching her favorite
subject
complex – adverb and independent clause
5. At the start of every year
not a clause
6.
While the student council officers organize school events
dependent clause
7.
Mrs. Markwell’s speech
8.
Senora Siniscalchi and the French teacher share a room and speak
two languages
9.
fragment
simple – compound subject and predicate
Ms. Awad is back to being a student at Rutger’s University
simple
10. Mrs. Stoller loves to play with her grandchildren because they give
lots of hugs
complex – adverb and independent clause
Homework Review:
Take out a green pen and your
homework from last night –
20.2 – Adjective Clauses.
26.2 - Commas
Check your answers
How did you do?
Learning Goals:
 Critically take Cornell notes and participate in
class discussion during an overview of Types
of Sentences (compound sentences).
 Work as a group to write two simple
sentences and link them with proper
punctuation.
TYPES OF SENTENCES:
DEFINITION
2 independent clauses
**must be joined together (2 ways)
COMPOUND SENTENCES:
Two ways to join independent
clauses:
1) COMMA + CONJUNCTION (,FANBOYS)
2) SEMICOLON (;)
Sally cooks dinner, and
and Jen draws.
,
,
Sally cooks dinner;n Jen draws.
*A conjunction is NOT part of the clause.
But what if…?
S
V
It started to snow, so the wrestling
match was cancelled.
S
V
2 – independent clauses
2
COMPOUND SENTENCE!
But what if…?
S
V
It started to snow; the wrestling
match was cancelled.
S
V
2
2 – independent clauses
COMPOUND SENTENCE!
To make two simple sentences into
a compound sentence, use a
comma and a coordinating
conjunction or a semi-colon.
Remember: the sentences must
be related.
Sentence
,
for
and
nor
but
or
yet
so
sentence
.
FANBOYS
Each
coordinating
conjunction
is used for a
different
purpose!
They each
have their
own job. 
for
and
nor
but
or
yet
so
FOR
The Problem Finder
Connects a solution
with a problem (because)
Let’s go to the swimming pool,
for it’s hot inside the house.
AND
The Matchmaker
Connects two ideas
that go together
I want to go to the circus, and I
want to ride a pony.
NOR
Mr. Negative
Negative form of (also means not)
I have never visited Asia, nor
have I ever visited Africa.
BUT
King Conflict
Connects two ideas that go
against each other
I need to go to the store, but
I’m feeling too sick to drive.
OR
The Decision Maker
Connects two choices
You can make a big poster, or
you can make a small clay
statue.
YET
But’s Evil Twin Brother
Connects two ideas that
go against each other
I don’t want to practice playing
the violin, yet I don’t want to
disobey my mother.
SO
The Problem-Solver
Connects a problem
with a result
I didn’t do my homework, so
my parents punished me.
REFERENCE HANDOUT
Turn to the back of the handout,
and see if you can fill-in the
blanks correctly!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6p
DSjOcFM3U
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES,
write a sentence with:
Two independent clauses joined
together by a comma and
FANBOYS word
Two independent clauses joined
together by a semi-colon [;]
LABEL the subjects and verbs
HOMEWORK
Compound Sentences
Comma and a Fanboy’s word
For this homework, do not use semicolons to combine your simple
sentences!
I looked into my crystal ball this morning
and saw a quiz on the horizon for tomorrow
on classifying sentence structure!
Are you ready?
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
DO NOW:
Day Six
Quiz Time
Copy your homework, and start your quiz.
When you are done with your quiz, hand it
into me.
Take a Do Now, “Identifying Sentence
Structure.” from the middle of your table
and complete [skip #4]; this will go in the
grammar section of your binder.
Identify each sentence on the Do Now as
either simple, compound, or complex.
Put the handout in your binder.
Do Now S
V
1. Kangaroo’s powerful hind legs are used
for hopping, and their thick, long tails
are used for balancing.
S
V
S
2. The large red or gray kangaroo may
stand as tall as seven feet.
V
S
S
V
3. Wallabies and kangaroo rats are smaller
animals that are also members of the
kangaroo S
family.
V
S
S
V
V
5. Although it does not bark, the dingo is
a dog-like rabbit.
S
S
S
V
6. Rabbits, foxes, and cats were
introduced into Australia by Europeans.
Homework Review:
Take out a green pen and your
homework from last night –
Compound Sentences
Check your answers
How did you do?
1. The black dog has won many prizes. He doesn't know many tricks.
The black dog has won many prizes, yet he doesn’t know many tricks.
2. She saw a cat run in front of her. She fell down while roller-skating.
She saw a cat run in front of her, so she fell down while roller-skating.
3. There was a meteor shower. The crew did not know how to avoid the
meteors.
There was a meteor shower, but the crew did not know how to avoid the
meteors.
4. I wanted to buy a baby Chihuahua. I started to save my money.
I wanted to buy a baby Chihuahua, so I started to save my money.
5. Gillian did not like to read. She was not very good at it.
Gillian did not like to read, for she was not very good at it.
6. Pam liked Wayne. Leena also liked Wayne.
Pam liked Wayne, and Leena also liked Wayne.
7. The little boy did not like going to school. He went anyway.
The little boy did not like going to school, yet he went anyway.
8. You can cry like a baby. You can clean your room like an adult.
You can cry like a baby, or you can clean your room like an adult.
9. She didn't want to play with Jill. She didn't want to play with Tim.
She didn’t want to play with Jill, and she didn’t want to play with Tim.
10. Arleen could not play with that boy. Arleen could not play with
that other boy.
Arleen could not play with that boy, nor could she play with that
other boy.
11. Let's go to the swimming pool. It's hot inside the house.
Let’s go to the swimming pool, for it’s hot inside the house.
12. I don’t want to eat. I don't want to drink.
I don’t want to eat, and I don’t want to drink.
13. I don’t want to practice playing my violin. I don’t want to disobey
my mother.
I don’t want to practice playing my violin, yet I don’t want to disobey
my mother.
14. I want to own my own company. I want to pay all my workers a lot
of money.
I want to own my own company, and I want to pay all my workers a lot
of money.
15. I need to go to the store. I'm feeling too sick to drive.
I need to go to the store, but I’m feeling too sick to drive.
16. Rabbits make good pets. They don’t make too much noise and they
are clean.
Rabbits make good pets, for they don’t make too much noise, and they
are clean.
17. I want to go to the circus. I want to ride a pony.
I want to go to the circus, and I want to ride a pony.
18. I didn’t do my homework. My parents punished me.
I didn’t do my homework, so my parents punished me.
19. I have never visited Asia. I have never visited Africa.
I have never visited Asia, nor have I visited Africa.
20. You can make a big poster. You can make a little clay statue.
You can make a big poster, or you can make a little clay statue.
Learning Goals:
 Critically take Cornell notes and participate in
class discussion during an overview of Types
of Sentences.
Practice:
1)Label the “S” and “V” in each sentence on
your Cornell Notes Page.
2)Determine the clauses and kinds to classify
the type of sentence.
 While Ulysses took the helm, he held his breath.
 Ulysses, while he took the helm, held his breath.
 Ulysses held his breath while he took the helm.
 Ulysses took the helm, and his crew was safe.
Follow these
Easy Classifying Steps:
1) Label every “S” and “V” in the sentence.
(*Hint: Label subjects first! What is V?)
2) Write the number of clauses (next to the
sentence).
3) Draw a solid line under independent
clauses.
4) Draw a broken line under dependent
clauses.
5) Draw a square around your coordinating
conjunction and a circle around your
subordinating conjunction.
6) Check to make sure each clause is
underlined in some way.
Types of Sentences:
SIMPLE
Independent
Clauses
1
Dependent
Clauses
-----
COMPOUND
2
-----
COMPLEX
1
1
COMPOUND- 2
COMPLEX
1
Compound – Complex example:
S
V
When it started to snow, the wrestling
S
V
S
match was cancelled,, and
and the coach
V
was not very happy.
3
1 – dependent clause
2 – independent clause
COMPOUND-COMPLEX SENTENCE!
TO REVIEW:
# and types of clauses
SIMPLE
Independent
Clauses
1
Dependent
Clauses
-----
COMPOUND
2
-----
COMPLEX
1
1
COMPOUND- 2
COMPLEX
1
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES,
write a compound-complex sentence.
LABEL the subjects and verbs
Follow the classifying steps to
make sure you wrote the
sentence correctly!
20.2 Classifying Sentences by
Structure (Double-sided)
HOMEWORK
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
DO NOW:
Day Seven
1)
Take a Do Now from the middle of your table and
complete the Do Now.
2)
Take out a green pen, and be prepared to check your
work. How ready are you for our upcoming test? Rate
yourself on a scale 1 – 5.
Learning Goals:
The learners will demonstrate ability to:
 classify types of sentences in a team review
game
Homework Review:
Take out a green pen and your
homework from last night –
20.2 – Classifying Sentences
Check your answers
How did you do?
Before you can run on your own,
you have to practice!
Ulysses took the helm.
# of clauses:
# of independent:
1
____
1
_______
0
# of dependent: ______
TYPE OF SENTENCE:
Simple
Sentence
__________________________
While Ulysses took the
helm, he held his
breath.
2
# of clauses: ____
1
# of independent: ______
1
# of dependent: _____
TYPE OF SENTENCE:
Complex
Sentence
______________________
Ulysses, while he took
the helm, held his
breath.
2
# of clauses: _____
1
# of independent: _____
1
# of dependent: _____
TYPE OF SENTENCE:
Complex
Sentence
______________________
Ulysses held his
breath while he took
the helm.
2
# of clauses: _____
1
# of independent: _____
1
# of dependent: _____
TYPE OF SENTENCE:
Complex
Sentence
_______________________
Ulysses took the helm,
and the crew was
safe.
2
# of clauses: _____
2
# of independent: _____
0
# of dependent: _____
TYPE OF SENTENCE:
______________________
Compound
Sentence
APPOSITIVES
An appositive is a noun or noun phrase
that renames another noun right beside it.
The appositive can be a short or long
combination of words.
Ex> Mrs. Stoller, a language arts teacher, is
crazy about types of sentences.
Ex> I like to watch the New York Mets, a
baseball team.
http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=schoolhouse+rock+appositives&ei=
UTF-8&fr=w3i&type=W3i_DS,202,0_0,Search,20140416,20034,0,87,0
You Finished the
Practice Race!
20.1 Appositives in Phrases
(whole page)
HOMEWORK
Learning Goals:
The learners will demonstrate ability to:
 Recognize and apply commas in a series
and in between adjectives
 Recognize misplaced modifiers and be
able to apply your knowledge to fix them
COMMAS
in a series
Use commas to separate items in a
series or list. Separating the items
with commas makes your meaning
clear to the readers.
Ex> Begin by gathering your
tools, reviewing the recipe, and
preheating the oven.
Ex> Add the sugar, baking soda,
baking powder, and salt.
COMMAS between adjectives
Use commas to separate adjectives of equal
rank.
– If the word “and” can be placed between the
adjectives without changing the meaning of the
sentence, then the adjectives are of equal rank.
– If the order of the adjectives can be changed, then
they are of equal rank.
Ex> You have made a simple, polite request.
DO NOT use commas to separate
adjectives that must stay in a specific
order.
Ex> I read descriptions of several ancient
temples in my guidebook.
Correcting Misplaced Modifiers
If a phrase or clause acting as an
adjective or adverb is not placed near
the word it modifies, the meaning of
the sentence may be unclear.
A modifier should be placed as close as possible to the
word it modifies (describes).
MISPLACED MODIFIER:
-We rented a boat at the lake with an outboard motor.
 [The misplaced phrase ‘with an outboard motor’
makes it seem as though the lake has an outboard
motor.]
CORRECTED SENTENCE:
-At the lake, we rented a boat with an outboard motor.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frrF_S4Q_Vc
26.2 Commas in a Series, Between
Adjectives – whole page
21.4 – Recognizing Misplaced Modifiers
(skip numbers 4 & 10)
Practice one only
We will go over this homework on
Tuesday of next week.
HOMEWORK
SYNTHESIZE:
IN SUMMARY SECTION OF NOTES, write a:
Fix the misplaced modifier in this
sentence. Rewrite it correctly:
Built of stone, kings were buried in
pyramids during the early dynastic
period of Egypt.
TRACKING MY LEARNING
4
I can teach it.
3
I understand and can apply it.
2
I think I understand it.
1
I’m not so sure I understand it.
0
I’ve got no idea, but I’m listening.
Video Review
Independent vs. Dependent:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNT1D0JoFk8
Fragments:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xRdLNT81Hio
Adverbs:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnIX1MWJ29o
Adverb Clauses:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tYXbxyqTjA
Adjective Clause:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoEWD6OT0_o
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Types of Sentences