Enriching Classes for ESOL
Students
Class Meeting One: Academic
Competence, Part A
Welcome!
Agenda
Two Warm-up Activities
Course Overview
Florida Consent Decree Overview
US and Florida Demographics
Three Principles for Designing Effective
Lessons for ESOL Students
Activity One
Icebreaker
2 adjectives that
describe yourself
Country you’d
like to visit
NAME
Unusual place lived
or visited
School
Grade
Subject
Sample
Organized
Interested
China
JUDY
Australia
Apple High
10th
Science
Activity Two
The Cart before the Donkey
Instructions
1. On the right side of your paper, draw a
mountain.
2. Draw a cabin on the mountain.
3. To the left of the mountain, draw a donkey.
4. To the left of the donkey, draw a cart being
pulled by the donkey.
5. Draw a woman sitting in the cart holding the
donkey’s reins.
6. Draw a hat and glasses on the woman.
Activity Three
Course Overview
T im e lin e s fo r C o m p le tio n o f th e E S O L T ra in in g R e q u ire m e n ts
C ATEG O R Y I
P rim a ry L an g ua g e A rts /E ng lish
Teacher
C A T E G O R Y II
C A T E G O R Y III
S o c ial S tud ies , M a th e m atics , S c ie nc e A ll o th e r s u b je c ts no t in c lu d e d in
a n d C om p u te r L ite rac y
C a te g o rie s I o r II
R E Q U IR E M E N T S
1 5 se m es te r c red it ho u rs o r 300 in - 3 s em es te r ho u rs o r 60 in -s e rvic e
s e rvic e c red it p o in ts *
c re d it p oin ts
3 s em es te r c re dit h ou rs o r 1 8 in s e rvic e c red it p o in ts
T IM E L IN E S
E xp e rie n c ed T e ac h e r:
6 ye a rs or m o re allo w e d fo r
c o m p le tio n (S e e N o te )
B eg in n in g T e a ch e r:
S a m e a s ab o ve fo r e xp e rie n ced
te a ch e rs
E xp e rie n c ed T e ac h e r:
1 ye a r to c om p le te
B eg in n in g T e a ch e r:
2 ye a rs to co m ple te
E xp e rie n c ed T e ac h e r :
1 ye a r to c om p le te
B eg in n in g T e a ch e r:
2 ye a rs to co m ple te
NOTE: As of Sept. 10, 2003, all current guidance counselors and administrators
have 3 years to complete 60 hours of ESOL training. New counselors and
administrators have 3 years from date of hire.
Course Components
Module 1:
Academic
Competence, Part A
Module 2:
Language Learning
Module 3: Culture,
Part A
Module 4:
Academic
Competence, Part B
Module 5: Literacy
Module 6:
Assessment
Module 7: Culture,
Part B
Module 8: Putting It
All Together
ESOL Alphabet Soup
ESOL
LEP
LY
LF
OMSLE
LCDS
L1
L2
NES
LES
ESOL Alphabet Soup
ESOL
English to Speakers of Other Languages
LEP
Limited English Proficient
LY
Limited, Yes Being Served
LF
Limited, Former
OMSLE Office of Multicultural Student Language
Education
ESOL Alphabet Soup
LCDS
L1
Linguistically and Culturally Diverse
Students
First Language
L2
Second Language
NES
Non-English Speaker
LES
Limited English Speaker
Activity Four
What we know about the
Florida Consent Decree
Brainstorm what you know…
The Florida Consent Decree
What is a consent decree?
Who were the plaintiffs and
defendants?
What did the plaintiffs want?
What are the main requirements of the
decree?
1. What is a consent decree?
It is an agreement made by a plaintiff and a
defendant to settle a lawsuit. The agreement is
enforceable by the court.
2. Who were the plaintiffs and defendants?
The plaintiffs were a coalition of eight civil rights
and education organizations who were
represented by META (Multicultural Education,
Training, and Advocacy, Inc.). The defendant
was the Florida State Board of Education.
3. What did the plaintiffs want?
The plaintiffs wanted equal access to education
for LEP students. They argued that if a child
could not understand the language of instruction,
in effect, he did not have access to education.
They wanted the schools to take certain steps
(such as identifying the children who need help
and modifying instruction to help students learn
both language and content) so that LEP students
had access to a good education.
4. What are the requirements of the Consent
Decree?
Identification and assessment
Equal access to appropriate programming
Equal access to categorical programs
Personnel training
Monitoring
Outcome measures
Major Legal Underpinnings
for Serving LEP Students
Brown v. the Board of Education (1954)
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act (1964)
Lau v. Nichols (1974)
Equal Educational Opportunities Act (1974)
Plyler v. Doe (1982)
Activity Five
Demographics
Complete the Demographics Anticipation
Guide, Study Guide pp. 15-16
1.
The number of immigrants to the US was the
highest ever in which decade?
Legal Immigration to the United States,
1820's to 1990's
Millions of Immigrants per Decade
11
All Others
10
Europe and Canada
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Transparency 7
Decade
90
19
80
19
70
60
19
19
50
40
19
19
30
19
20
19
10
19
00
90
19
18
80
70
18
18
60
18
50
40
18
18
30
18
18
20
0
2.
In 2000,11.1%
____ of the US population was
foreign-born, compared to 14.7% in 1910.
3.
Among adults who speak
another language at home,
90% also speak English
about ____
well or very well.
4.
In the year 2000, immigrants
30% of the new
made up ____
entrants in the workforce.
5.
Three-fourths of those who speak another
language at home live in six states.
6.
Nationwide, approximately how many
households speak a language other than
English?
47 million
US Population 5
years and over
262,375,152 100.0%
Speak only English
215,423,557
82.1%
Speak a language
other than English
46,951,595
17.9%
7.
What percentage of K-12
students nationwide was LEP
students in the 2000-01 school
year?
9.6%
8.
LEP students in Florida averaged
3.09
___ years in ESOL programs.
9.
According to 2000 Census data, what is
the approximate percentage of population
in Florida reported being Hispanic? 17%
10. LEP students comprised 11%
___ of
the K-12 student population in
Florida in 2000-01?
11. What percentage of K-12 public
schools in Florida had ESOL
91%
students in 2000-01?
12. How many languages were spoken by
Florida K-12 students in 2000-01? 239
Native Languages
Percent
Native Language
Students
of Total
English
1,973,839 80.98%
Spanish
356,639 14.63%
Haitian-Creole
53,093
2.18%
Portuguese
7,490
0.31%
French
5,289
0.22%
Vietnamese
4,813
0.20%
Chinese, Zhongwen
3,377
0.14%
Arabic
3,324
0.14%
Russian
2,081
0.09%
Urdu
1,948
0.08%
All Others (229 Languages)
25,683
1.05%
Total
2,437,576 100.00%
But Students whose
Native Language is not
English may also speak
English...
Source: Survey 2, 2000/01
Florida’s Students speak
239 Languages - From
Arabic to Zulu - Many
represented by only 1
Speaker
English/Non-English
Non-Native
English
19.02%
Native
English
80.98%
Florida Department of Education • Bureau of Equity, Safety, and School Support
13. As of the 2000-01 school year, the majority
of LEP students came from which country?
United States
Numbers from Country of Origin
50
40
30
20
10
0
USA
(141,500)
Cuba
(216,691)
Haiti
(18,596)
Colom bia
(17,025)
Mexico
(15,776)
Puerto Rico
(14,811)
14. How many LEP students were
in Florida in 2000-01? 219,449
Florida K-12 LEP Population
250,000
200,000
150,000
100,000
50,000
0
90-1
110,060
92-3
131,715
94-5
155,798
96-7
159,598
98-9
176,490
00-1
219,449
Activity Six
Three Principles for
Designing Effective
Lesson for ESOL
Students
Three Principles
Increase Comprehensibility
Increase Interaction
Increase Higher Order Thinking Skills
1. Increase Comprehensibility
Traditional Sequence
Read text
Answer questions
Discuss material
Do applications/
expansions
Teach the Text
Backwards
Do applications/
expansions
Discuss material
Answer/preview
questions
Read text
2. Increase Interaction
Through pair/group work:
Think-Write-Pair-Share
Numbered Heads Together
Jigsaw
Peer Tutoring
Pair Assignments
Cooperative Projects
When using pair/group work:
Vary grouping strategies
Plan for positive interdependence and
individual accountability
Teach and model activities before
asking students to do them
Recognize and reward effective group
work
Increase Thinking Skills
Analysis
Synthesis
Evaluation
Numbered Heads
Together Review Activity
Numbered Heads Directions
Divide students into groups with equal
numbers (four per group is preferable).
Assign numbers to each group.
Ask students in each group to number off.
For example, if you have groups of four,
group members will number off from 1 to 4.
Tip: If one group is smaller than the others,
ask one or two members of the smaller group
to represent two numbers (i.e., respond as
the #3 member and as the #4 member).
Ask one of the review questions.
Ask students in each group to “put their heads
together” in order to decide on an answer. All
students must be prepared to answer the
question.
After students have reviewed the answer in
their small groups, randomly select one of the
groups using a spinner, dice, or slips of paper
(e.g., group 2).
Then randomly select one of the members of
the selected group to answer the question.
Ask next question and continue.
Review Questions
1. Name the three principles for designing
effective lessons for second language
learners.
2. Explain why it is important to increase
comprehensibility for ESOL students in
mainstream classes.
3. Describe how a mainstream teacher can
increase comprehensibility for ESOL
students.
4. Explain why it is important to increase
interaction for ESOL students in mainstream
classrooms.
5. Describe how a mainstream teacher can
increase interaction for ESOL students.
6. Name four things to remember when using
pair/group work.
7. Explain how positive interdependence and
individual accountability are accomplished
in a Numbered Heads Together activity.
8. Explain why it is important to increase
thinking skills for ESOL students in
mainstream classrooms.
9. Describe how a mainstream teacher can
increase thinking skills for ESOL students.
10. What are teachers required to turn in the last
week of this course?
11. How many quizzes will teachers take during
this course?
David Hirschy Video
Complete the Video Observation
Form, Study Guide p. 19
How does David:
Increase Comprehensibility?
Increase Interaction?
Increase Higher Order Thinking Skills?
Applying the Three
Principles to a Lesson
Instructions
1. In order to increase comprehensibility
(principle #1), design a hands-on
activity that introduces key concepts
from the chapter and/or builds prior
knowledge. (In keeping with the Teach
the Text Backwards sequence, this
activity is intended to be done with
students prior to their reading of the
chapter. In other words, this activity is
used to introduce the chapter.)
2. In order to increase interaction
(principle #2), design a cooperative
learning activity that corresponds
with a particular section of the
chapter. Make sure the activity
fosters both positive
interdependence and individual
accountability.
3. In order to foster higher order
thinking skills (principle #3), create an
assignment or a set of questions that
cultivate critical thinking.
Preview of Online Module 1
Assignments
1. Design a Lesson that Applies the Three
Principles
2. Discussion about Lesson Implementation
3. Critique of Echolocation Lesson (S.G. p. 20)
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