Performance Standards
Floridafor
Education:
Teachers The
of Next
Generation
English Language
Learners
DRAFT
March 13, 2008
Lori Rodriguez and Mary Jane Tappen
Version 1.0
Carlos Alvarez, Facilitator
August 12-14, 2009
Florida Department of Education
Dr. Eric J. Smith,
Commissioner
The Task
• As highly qualified ESOL practitioners,
researchers and trainers, it will be your
responsibility to frame and write a draft of
Professional ESOL Performance Standards
for the Florida Department of Education.
• These standards will be recommended to the
Commissioner of Education for adoption as a
rule by the State Board of Education.
Key Issues
• On March 17, 2009, Rule 6A-4.02451
Performance Standards, Skills, and
Competencies, for the Endorsement in English
for Speakers of Other Languages was passed
by the State Board of Education, and placed
into Rule.
What Do ELLs in Florida Look Like?
• The needs of ELLs in Florida are significant
but surmountable.
• 240,000 ELLs in Florida
• 300 different languages spoken among these
students.
• 74% Spanish is native language
• 11% Haitian-Creole is native language
English-Language Learners
Percent by school district
More than 20%
11%-20%
6% to 10%
1% to 5%
Less than 1%
Student Performance on FCAT
• Approximately 1,500,000 in grades 3-10 took
FCAT reading and math in the spring of 2009.
• Approximately 105,000 of those in grades 3-10
are current ELLs.
Student Achievement Among ELLs
FCAT ‘2009
•In reading there was a 1% gain
•In mathematics there was no gain,
•In science, there was:
= no increase for grade 5
-> 1% increase for grade 8 and
<- 1% decrease for grade 11
What does this tell Florida about our
ELLs?
1) They are NOT making significant gains in Reading,
2) Struggling in Mathematics, and
3) Drowning in Science
In other words, part of our task this week is to
remember that whatever we write in these standards
will reflect the way our teachers teach our ELLs, and
how this will effect the ultimate outcome – Student
Performance.
Getting Started
• Ground Rules : Look in your binder
• Rulemaking: Once drafted, these Standards
will have to go through the Rule Development
Process.
• Consent Decree: Even if the draft is perfect for
this team, the Consent Decree will always be a
factor.
• Setting Goals for Framing and Writing:
Without a goal there is no vision!
Smart Goals
SMART Goals
• Specific – the expected outcome stated as simply, concisely
and explicitly as possible. This answers the: how much, for
whom, and for what?
• Measurable – an outcome that can be assessed either on a
sliding scale (1-10), or as a hit or miss, success or failure.
• Achievable – an outcome that is realistic given the present
situation, resources and available time. Goal achievement may
be tight if the outcome is tough or there is a weak starting
position.
• Relevant – this goal should help with the mission or
objective.
• Time-bound – realistic timeframe (s).
List the Goals
• Revise?
• Infuse?
• Provide?
• Increase?
Evaluate, Add, Change, Develop, Integrate
and Cooperate, in order to bring RESULTS!
What does your ideal model look like?
Focus on the “what” that needs to be achieved.
What is our goal?
• Draft teacher ESOL performance
standards for inservice and pre-service to
prepare teachers for instruction of ELLs.
• Later – issues that will need to be
addressed
– Reading cross walk
– Recognized PD courses
– Alignment with ESOL certification test
Consider All the Previous Factors and
Then Some
• According to A Recent Survey of California
Teachers’ Challenges, Experiences, and
Professional Development Needs – One of the
findings: “Greater preparation for teaching
English learners equaled greater teacher
confidence in their skills for working with
these students successfully.”
Other thoughts Prior to
Framing
• New Diversity Within the ELL Population
• English language learners, including students with
interrupted or limited formal schooling, literacy and
English proficiency
• All teachers need to become aware of the distinction
between BICS (social language) and CALP (academic
language) skills, as well as learning how to adapt
instruction for the dual goals of content and
language learning
• Remember these statistics in your goal-making.
Florida Education: The Next
Questions?
Generation
DRAFT
March 13, 2008
Version 1.0
Substantive Content
1.
Applied Linguistics
A.
B.
C.
2.
Knowledge of English
First and Second language
acquisition
Language awareness
Literacies
A.
B.
C.
4.
Culture
A.
B.
5.
Methods and Curriculum
A.
B.
C.
Speaking/listening
Reading
Writing
D.
3.
Assessment
A.
B.
C
D.
E.
What
How
Accommodations
Action Plans
Alternative assessments
6.
Parental and Community
Involvement – Communications
Knowledge of student
Curriculum development
Use of technology
Differentiation – ESE, ELL,
gifted, RTI…..
Heterogeneity student
achievement (period of
induction)
Legal issues
A.
knowledge of Florida, other
states, and federal statutory
and regulatory framework and
case law
English Literacy Development
Introduction
The primary goal of literacy instruction, which includes:
listening/speaking, reading/writing, numeracy, and visual literacy is the
understanding and communication of meaning. Developing an
awareness of the forms, functions and uses of literacy in different
cultures and its impact on second language literacy development is
critical for educators. (Colorin Colorado - 2007)(International Visual
Literacy Association)
1. Demonstrate the effective use of a variety of instructional practices
and materials to develop student listening, speaking, reading,
writing, and visual literacy skills across different genres and content
areas.
1.A.1 Speaking/Listening indicator
1.A.1. remark and example
1.B.1 Reading indicator
1.B.1. remark and example
1.C.1Writing indicator
1.C.1. remark and example
(Identify glossary terms)
(Citations)
Challenges
• Where do we place the highest values (content of
standards)?
• Clarity of what is expected of a teacher of ELL students
• Florida – the diversity of the state and the teacher and
student population (density of ELLs and diversity of
ELLs, culture of the teachers)
• Broad audience – SUS, teacher prep, district
professional development
• The length of time these will be in place
• Current requirements – 300 hours – how it has been
subdivided to date? Relationship to requirements of the
Consent Decree
Structure - Form
•
•
•
•
National Board
TESOL
WIDA
Florida’s Current
ESOL standards
• Massachusetts
• Texas
• Florida’s
Competencies and
Skills
Decisions:
• Use the term
standards
Stems
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Demonstrate the ability to
Apply the
Identify
Analyze
Produce - Create
Interpret
Propose
Connect
Select and adapt
Research
• PISA – Where Immigrants Succeed
– Teachers scaffold
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Skeehan
Ron Ellis
Diane August
Pauline Gibbons - English Learners –
Jennifer Hammond
Second and third generation do not do well
Students plateau or regress
Teachers need to model academic use of language –
routines
• Re-segregation of schools
Content of Performance Standards
Entire document
• Preface –
– Why the urgency of change?
Specific to standards
Standards introductions
Literacy
– Awareness of the functions and uses of literacy in
different cultures and its impact on second language
literacy development
– Writing for communication
• Glossary to terms
• Remarks and examples
Assignments
• Review/list of research documents
• For content topics
– Draft a standard
– Provide backup research
Group Work
• Preferred a secondary with a district level
Expert Groups
Wednesday’s agenda:
• Literacy – two working groups
• Oralcy and writing
• Research
Descargar

Performance Standards for Teachers of English Language