Slide 1
Complete Sentences
A sentence has 2 parts:
1. A predicate
2. A subject
A sentence does 4 things:
1. Gives a command or request.
2. States a fact.
3. Expresses strong feeling.
4. Asks a question.
Circle the number of the complete sentence.
1. Tony, following directions, lowered the sail.
2. While putting his foot onto the dagger board.
Slide2
Kinds of Sentences
There are 4 kinds of sentences. Each kind begins with a capital letter and
ends with some kind of punctuation.
 A Declarative sentence makes a statement. It ends with a period.
“We are ready to sail.”
 An Interrogative sentence asks a question. It ends with a question
mark. “Did you bring a lunch?”
 An Imperative sentence gives a command or a request. It ends with
a period. “Untie the knot.”
 An Exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. It ends with an
exclamation point. “What a great day this is!”
Slide 3
Sentence Fragments
A sentence fragment is a group of words that looks like a sentence, but
does not express a complete thought.
Create the following chart:
Fragment
1. very frightened
2. pretty foolish
3. hard working
4. lots of fun
Sentence
Slide 4
Capital Letters
Sentences begin with capital letters. Write 3
sentences that describe what you would buy if you
had $300.
Switch with a neighbor and correct for capital letters
and complete thoughts.
Slide 5
Sentence Kind Review
Use the end punctuation to determine what kind of sentence.
1. How could you earn some extra money?
2. Jamal wants to walk his neighbor’s dog.
3. Take the leash with you.
4. I collected fifty dollars this summer!
Write a declarative and an imperative sentence of your own.
Slide 6
Subjects and Predicates
A complete sentence has a subject and a predicate.
The subject is the word or group of words that the sentence
is about. All words in the subject make up a complete
subject. The most important word in the complete subject is
the simple subject. It is usually a noun or a pronoun.
Our class read Teammates today.
Slide7
Subjects and Predicates
A predicate is the word or group of words
that tells something about the subject. All the
words in the predicate make up the complete
predicate. The most important word in the
complete predicate is the verb. It is called the
simple predicate.
We enjoyed this book.
Slide 8
Subjects and Predicates
What part of the sentence is underlined?
1. Rosa plays baseball with her family.
2. The Vikings and the Rangers won every game this
season.
Slide 9
Subject and Predicate Review
Make a list of 5 nouns.
Make a list of 5 verbs.
Using the 5 nouns and 5 verbs you wrote, create 5
sentences. Circle the complete subject and underline the
complete predicate.
The dog walked through the park.
Slide 10
Sentence Combining
A conjunction joins words or a group of words.
And adds information
But shows contrast
Or gives a choice
A compound sentence is two sentences joined with
a comma and a conjunction.
Use a semicolon to separate two parts of a
compound sentence when they are not connected
by a conjunction.
Slide 11
Sentence Combining
A compound subject has two or more subjects
that have the same predicate.
I like to ski. Carlos likes to ski.
Carlos and I like to ski.
A compound predicate has two or more
predicates with the same subject.
Aidan likes soccer. Aidan likes basketball.
Aidan likes soccer and basketball.
Slide 12
Combining Sentences
Combine the following sentences.
1. My father wants to move to California.
My mother doesn’t.
2. Fritz doesn’t like football. Fritz doesn’t
like squash.
3. Audrey can go to the movies on Friday.
She can go on Saturday.
Slide 13
Subjects in Sentences
Circle the subject of each sentence.
1. Tom still has a scraggly beard.
2. Susan’s thick, wavy hair had turned gray
early.
3. The idea made April sick.
4. The bus kitchen was like a playhouse.
5. April and Gus slept in berths.
Slide 14
Combining Sentences
Rewrite the paragraph; combining short sentences with a
conjunction to form compound subjects, compound predicates,
or compound sentences.
People put on their clothing every day. They do not think
about how their pants stay put. They do not think about how
their jackets stay put. Jackets have zippers. Pants have
zippers. The zipper was invented in 1893 by Judson. He
called his invention a “clasp-locker.”
Slide 15
Independent and Dependent Clauses
An independent clause is a sentence part that has a
subject and a verb and makes sense by itself. A dependent
clause is a sentence part that has a subject and a verb but
does NOT make sense by itself. A dependent clause cannot
stand alone.
Lee’s family likes music, and they each play an
instrument.
After eating dinner, everyone gathers to learn a new song.
Slide 16
Independent and Dependent Clauses
Tell whether the underlined words are independent
clauses or dependent clauses.
1. Christina hoped her parents could come, but she also felt
pretty nervous.
2. She wondered if they would like her new poem, which she
had just written.
3. During her poetry reading, her parents smiles and nodded
their heads.
Slide 17
Independent Clause Review
An independent clause is a sentence part that has both a
subject and a verb and makes sense by itself.
For each sentence below write the independent clause.
1. After we had eaten our fill, we drifted away from the table to go
outside.
2. In Los Angeles, Yoshiko Uchida was the youngest of all
thirteen children.
3. Obah San was the first to go, every Sunday.
Slide 18
Dependent Clause Review
A dependent clause is a sentence part that has both a subject
and a verb and does not make sense by itself.
For each sentence below write the dependent clause.
1. Before the ship pulls out, the captain must check the
compass and the map.
2. Caught up in the festival excitement, I used to wish I were
the one sailing off to Japan.
3. The morning we docked, she was up early.
Slide 19
Independent/Dependent Clause Review
Rewrite these sentences. Put the dependent clause in
parentheses.
1. The girls continued their raking, even though they were
tired.
2. Yellowstone is a national park in the West that is famous for
the geysers.
3. The dog did a flip whenever I clapped my hands.
Slide 20
Compound/Complex Sentences
Compound sentences contain two independent
clauses. They are joined with a comma and a word such as or,
and, or but (conjunctions).
The boat was leaving, and the passengers threw confetti.
Complex sentences contain one independent clause
and one or more dependent clauses. These are joined by
words such as if, because, or when.
The children felt sick when the ship started to pitch and roll.
Slide 21
Compound/Complex Sentences
Read the following sentences. Write the sentence and tell
whether each is a compound or a complex sentence.
1. We packed our clothes, which had already been washed.
2. The boat is ready to leave, but the passengers have not
yet arrived.
3. They wrote to us, and a week later we wrote back.
4. Whenever she goes, she collects recipes.
5. Her collection is huge, but the recipes are all different.
Slide 22
Writing Compound and Complex Sentences
REMEMBER:
Compound sentences are joined together with conjunctions.
You may also see so, nor, for or yet.
Complex sentences use the words because, although, if,
before, after, or when.
Make #1 a compound sentence. Make #2 a complex
sentence.
1. Yoshiko Uchida had not met all her relatives. Her parents
took her to Japan.
2. Yoshiko liked Japan. She looked like everyone else.
Slide 23
Compound Sentence Review
A compound sentence contains two or more independent
clauses or simple sentences. They are joined together with a
comma and a word such as yet, so, nor, for, and, but, or or.
In the following sentences, identifying the joining words.
1. Uncle Douglas’s red car was parked outside the garage, so I knew they
were there.
2.
Mother’s voice was still pleasant, but she was considerably firmer.
3.
He walked to the door, so he could go outside.
4.
Do you want to go to the store, or do you want to stay home?
Slide 24
Sentence Combining
Simple sentence after simple sentence makes for
choppy writing. Writers often combine sentences together to
make their writing smoother. They turn simple sentences into
complex sentences.
Two simple sentences with the same predicate can
become a sentence with a compound subject. For
example:
•Jake liked the movie. Eliza liked the movie
•Jake and Eliza liked the movie.
Slide 25
Sentence Combining
Two simple sentences with the same subject can become a
sentence with a compound predicate. For example:
•Marva loves fish. Marva loves burritos.
•Marva loves fish and burritos.
Combine the following sentences using the word and.
1. Hassan was sick. Hassan didn’t go to school.
2. He had a fever. He had a rash.
3. His mother called the doctor. His father called the doctor.
Slide 26
Common Nouns and Proper Nouns
A proper noun names a specific person, place, or thing.
For example: Martin Luther King Jr., The Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame, and Christmas. Proper nouns are capitalized.
Common nouns do not name a particular person, place,
or thing. The words school, museum, and day are all common
nouns. Common nouns are not capitalized.
Slide 27
Common and Proper Nouns
Rewrite the paragraph below. Underline each
common noun and circle each proper noun.
My mother has always loved birds. She once had a parakeet from
New Zealand and a Mynah bird from the jungles of South Africa. She fed
them Tweety Bird Birdseed, which we bought from Dr. Pete’s Pet Store.
Those two birds adored Mom. Whenever she went near their cages, they
would chirp, twitter, and sing.
Slide 28
Practicing Proper and Common Nouns
Rewrite the following paragraph. Make sure that
you capitalize proper nouns.
One day mom took a quick peek inside the Cage. “My
new Zealand bird is not chirping!” she cried. “Call dr. Pete!” I
ran for the Phone. When miss Monroe answered, I explained
the situation. “Bring that Bird here,” she ordered. “We’re at 222
Valley lane, just north of Beckman park,” she explained.
Slide 29
Identify Proper and Common Nouns
Proper nouns name particular places, things, people and ideas.
Proper nouns are capitalized.
Common nouns do not refer to particular people, places, things, or
ideas. These begin with a lower case letter.
Create the chart below. Fill in the missing information.
Proper Nouns
Common Nouns
1. Mrs. Nelson
1. teacher
2.
2.
3.
3.
4.
M & M’s
4.
boy
Slide 30
Plural Nouns
A plural noun names more than one person, place,
thing, or idea. There are two kinds of plural nouns: regular
plural nouns and irregular plural nouns.
Regular Nouns
• Add - s to form the plural of most nouns: sign – signs.
• Add –es to nouns that end in ch, sh, s, ss, or x: church-churches,
dish-dishes, fox-foxes, loss-losses.
• If a noun ends in a consonant and a y, change the y to I and ad es:
party-parties.
Slide 31
Plural Nouns
• Some nouns have the same singular and plural form: fish-fish.
• Other nouns have a spelling change: mouse-mice.
• Form the plural of some nouns ending in f or fe by changing the f
or fe to ve and add es: wife-wives, wolf-wolves.
• Add –s to most nouns that end in f and ff: roof-roofs, sheriffsheriffs.
• Add –s to nouns ending in a vowel and o: video-videos.
• Use a dictionary to help with words like potato-potatoes.
Slide 32
Plural Nouns
Form the plural of the following words.
1. calf
2. mosquito
3. raspberry
4. grass
5. fluff
6. mouse
Slide 33
Practicing Plural Nouns
Write the correct plural noun that completes the sentence.
1. A group of five (women, woman) and a guide were climbing Mount
Everest.
2.
Slowly the (climber, climbers) made their way to the top.
3. They felt like (heroes, heros) as they approached the summit.
4. This climb would make a great story for their (grandchilds,
grandchildren).
5. This was the most exciting adventure of their (lifes, lives).
Slide 34
Practicing Plural Nouns
Write the sentence making the noun, in parentheses, plural to
complete the sentence.
1. Hector has been collecting (rock) for many years.
2.
He keeps them in (box) in the attic.
3.
He sometimes brings (berry) to eat on his hiking trips.
4.
Hector thinks these are sturdy (shelf).
5.
Sunlight shone through the (leaf) on the trees.
6.
(bunch) of wild grapes grew on the vines.
Slide 35
Irregular Plural Nouns
To form the plural of some nouns ending in f or fe, change the f to
v and add – es.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel followed by o add –
s.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant followed by o,
add – s or - es.
Slide 36
Irregular Plural Nouns
Rewrite the sentences creating the correct plural of the
noun.
1. A local farmer reported that three of his youngest (calf) were
missing.
2. The farmer worried that they had lost their (life).
3. The clown preformed in several of the (rodeo).
4. Baked (potato) are a favorite at dinner.
Slide 37
Irregular Plural Nouns
 Some nouns, like woman and child, have a special plural form
that does not end in – s
 woman
women
 child
children
 Some nouns, like fish and moose, stay the same whether
singular or plural.
Slide 38
Irregular Plural Nouns
Rewrite the sentences creating the correct plural of the
noun.
1. After hearing about the storm, (person) swarmed to the stores.
2. Meteorologists said the storm met all the (criterion) for being a
blizzard.
3. Cans of food became as scarce as hen’s (tooth).
4. The (loaf) of bread were the first to go.
5. My sister found two frightened (mouse) behind a box.
Slide 39
Irregular Plural Nouns
Rewrite the sentences creating the correct plural of the
noun.
1. Many of the (shelf) at the supermarket had already been
emptied.
2. People lined up like (sheep) at the registers.
3. No one had any battery-operated (radio) left to sell.
4. My sister found a case of diced (tomato) in the basement.
Slide 40
Possessive Nouns
A possessive noun names who or what owns something
A possessive noun can be singular or plural
A possessive noun can be common or proper
A possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe and an –s
to a singular nouns, even when they end in s
Slide 41
Possessive Nouns
Possessive nouns show that one or
more nouns own something. Possessive
nouns are formed with an apostrophe and s
or with only an apostrophe.
• Add ‘s to form the possessive of most
singular nouns: horse’s stall, farmer’s barn.
• Add ‘s to form the possessive of plural nouns
that do not end in s: mice’s nest, men’s hat.
Slide 42
Possessive Nouns
Write the correct possessive form of the underlined
word.
1. Last weekends thunderstorm
was fierce!
2. My parents party was
cancelled.
Slide 43
Possessive Plural Nouns
• If a plural possessive noun is regular
and ends in –s, add an apostrophe
• Three baseball players’ paycheck
was more than three doctors’
paycheck.
• If a plural possessive noun is irregular
and does not end in –s, add an
Slide 44
Possessive Noun Review
Rewrite each sentence to show possession.
1. the color of the sky (The sky’s
color.)
2. the legs of the sheep
3. a purse belonging to a woman
4. the young of the horse
Slide 45
Appositives
• An appositive is a noun or pronoun placed
next to another noun or pronoun to identify
or explain it
• An appositive includes the appositive and
the words that modify the appositive
Example: Dr. Campbell, our veterinarian,
gave Kimba her annual physical.
Slide 46
Appositives
Tell whether each underlined word is an appositive.
1. Kimba is my sister’s pet cat.
2. The doctor found a strange spot, a
pink blister, just behind Kimba’s ear.
3. She said it was probably nothing to
worry about.
Slide 47
Appositives
• Some appositives are nonessential to
the meaning of a sentence
Non-essential example: Dan, an
excellent cook, made dinner for us
tonight.
• Other appositives are essential to the
meaning of a sentence. (These
usually consist of one word)
Slide 48
Appositives
Tell whether the underlined appositive in each sentence is
essential or nonessential.
1. Our drama coach, Mr. Wright, had to
call in the understudy.
2. My brother Alan had hoped for a
chance to play the part.
3. He tried out for the play along with my
youngest brother, Vince.
4. Of course, Alan auditioned for the role
of Buckley, the hero.
Slide 49
Appositives
• If an appositive comes:
• at the beginning of a sentence,
it is usually followed by a comma
• at the end of a sentence, it
should be proceeded by a
comma
• In the middle of a sentence, it
should be proceeded and
Slide 50
Direct/Indirect Objects
• An action verb followed by a word that
answers the question what? or whom?
is called the direct object
• An action verb that only tells what
someone or something does or only
tells when, where, or how is called an
indirect object
Jason kicked Kaylee the ball.
action verb: kicked
Slide 51
Direct/Indirect Objects
• The direct object receives the action of the
verb in a sentence and tell who or what is
affected by the verb’s action.
• An indirect object always appears before
the direct object and tells to whom or for
whom the action is done.
Underline the verb, put () around the direct
object, and circle the indirect object.
1. The men prepare everybody a feast.
Slide 52
Direct/Indirect Objects
Tell whether the underlined words are
direct or indirect objects.
1. Trey had a rather embarrassing habit.
2. His classmates gave him the nickname
“Hopalong.”
3. Trey liked the name because it reminded
him of Hopalong Cassidy.
Slide 53
Direct/Indirect Objects
Label the direct objects (DO) and
indirect object (IO).
1.The wrangler brought the two
friends their horses.
2. Her mother taught her everything
she knew.
3.Greg attended his first riding
Slide 54
Direct/Indirect Objects
Circle the direct objects and underline
the indirect objects.
1. Katie brought the red ball to Kathy.
2. Rita knew how to ride well.
3. Fred learned how to add on Friday.
4. Mike rode his bike to the store.
5. The teacher taught her sixth grade
class how to divide.
Slide 55
Past Tense Verbs
• The past tense of most verbs is
formed by adding -d or –ed to the
base form of the word.
• Some verbs form their past tense with
a completely different word, these are
called irregular. (draw/drew,
bring/brought, lose/lost, speak/spoke)
Make these sentences show past tense.
1. Jamie (walk) down to the beach
Slide 56
Future Tense Verbs
• To form the future tense, place the
helping verb will before the base form
of the verb.
• I will go to the store tonight.
Make these sentences show future
tense.
1. Jeff (walk) down to the store.
2. Kathy (run) a race this weekend.
Slide 57
Past and Future Tense Verbs
Tell whether the sentences are past
tense or future tense.
1. She will drink pots and pots of coffee
to keep herself awake.
2. Two hours past her bedtime, Katie fell
into a deep sleep.
3. When everyone hears the music, they
will dance all night long.
Slide 58
Past and Future Tense Verbs
Correct the sentences below. Pay special
attention to the tenses of the verbs.
1. Jane runned home, when she heared
that her parents bought a boat.
2. “When did you buy it?” she ask them.
3. Jane asked, “When will we are able to
go sailing?”
4. Her father thinked, that he should
Slide 59
Past and Future Tense Verbs
Change the sentences below into
the tense indicated.
1.The starters’ flare will tell us when
the race begins. (past)
2. Franco leapt ahead of the others.
(future)
3. Trish threw her javelin the
Slide 60
Main and Helping Verbs
A verb phrase is made up of a main
verb, something you can do, and one
or more helping verbs.
Common helping verbs: am, are, is,
was, were, have, has, had, do, does,
did, be, being, been, will, shall, can,
could, would, should, might, must.
A helping verb places an action at
Slide 61
Main and Helping Verbs
Tell which words are helping verbs and which are main verbs.
Write the sentences underlining the verbs, circle the
helping verbs.
1. Gaby had been thinking about summer.
2. She had read an article about vacations.
3. She is spending far too much time day dreaming.
4. Her father said that he would pay for a summer camp.
Slide 62
Main and Helping Verbs
Helping verbs place an action or event in time.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Present progressive: happening now action
I am laughing.
Present perfect: action occurred at some point in time
I
have laughed.
Past perfect: happened before another event
I had laughed.
Past progressive: action happening while another action is
happening I was laughing.
Future progressive: an action that will happen while another
action happens I will be laughing.
Slide 63
Main and Helping Verbs
Tell which tense is shown. Refer back to slide 62.
1. My sister Cara is working on an energy monitoring project for school.
2. Her class had studied resource consumption before last semester.
3. For the next month, we will be recording our electricity usage.
4. I have always wondered just how much energy we use.
5. I was planning to do something similar.
Slide 64
Main and Helping Verbs
Rewrite the sentence and the correct version of the helping
verb and main verb in parentheses.
1. Carol (have look) over my homework yesterday.
2. Right now, the birds (be eat) at the .
3. Danny (be attend) a new school next year.
Slide 65
Linking Verbs
A linking verb links the subject of the sentence with a noun or
adjective in the predicate
Common linking verbs include: be, become, seem, appear, look,
grow, turn, taste, feel, and smell
Some of these verbs can be used as action verbs.
I tasted the cake.
In the following sentence the cake isn’t performing the action of
tasting so tasting is a linking verb.
The cake tastes delicious.
Slide 66
Linking Verbs
A predicate noun follows a linking verb and tells what the subject
is.
Example:
Maury Obleck is the best sculptor in our community.
A predicate adjective follows a linking verb and tells what the
subject is like.
Example:
Over the years, his work has become quite famous.
Identify the two following sentences.
1. His biggest piece, Sitting Soldier, is quite tall!
2. Sitting Soldier is a young man sitting on a log.
Slide 67
Linking Verbs
Underline the subject. Circle either the predicate noun or the
predicate adjective.
1. My favorite group’s new CD is a masterpiece!
2. The name of the disc is Ten Steps Around.
3. The guitar sounds a lot fuzzier than on their first CD.
4. The pounding bass drum on “Who Knows” feels amazing.
Slide 68
Linking Verbs
Underline the subject. Circle either the predicate noun or the
predicate adjective.
1. The song is a ballad written in memory of the guitarist’s mother.
2. When I first heard the song, I felt incredibly sad.
3. The wailing melody turns very tender toward the end.
4. The band seems read for superstardom!
Slide 69
Linking Verbs
Use linking verbs to make complete sentences.
1. Jordan/restless
2. seedlings/bountiful plants
3. ice/safe
4. Soup/spicy
5. explorers/frightened
Slide 70
Regular/Irregular Verbs
•
To make the past tense or past participial form of a regular verb
an ed is added at the end.
• walk
walked have walked
• help
helped
have helped
•
An irregular verb can form its past tense and past participle by
changing a vowel or the spelling.
• begin
began
have begun
• go
went
have gone
Slide 71
Irregular Verbs
•
An irregular verb can form its past tense and past participle by
changing a vowel or the spelling.
do
drive
hide
•
did
drove
hid
done
driven
hidden
Some irregular verbs have special spelling when used with the
helping verbs have, has, or had.
I tore my sleeve.
I had torn my sleeve.
Slide 72
Irregular Verbs
•
An irregular verb can form its past tense and past participle by
changing a vowel or the spelling.
do
drive
hide
•
did
drove
hid
done
driven
hidden
Some irregular verbs have special spelling when used with the
helping verbs have, had, or had.
I tore my sleeve.
I had torn my sleeve.
Slide 28
Combining Sentences
Rewrite the following paragraph so that it is more
interesting to read. (Hint: use compound and complex
sentences!!)
“The Telephone Call,” is a terrific story. It is about a family.
The family is kind. The family is loving. An orphan child comes to
live with them. The family has some trouble adjusting. The child’s
name is Maggy. Ms. L’Engles’s characters are realistic. Her writing
style is simple. Her writing is never dull. I recommend this story.
Slide 29
Test Review
Answer the following questions.
1.
What is a complete sentence?
2.
What is a sentence fragment?
3.
What does a sentence start with?
4.
List the four types of sentences.
5.
Write a sentence for each sentence type in number 4.
6.
What does a sentence end with? Name all that apply.
Slide 30
Test Review
7. What is a subject?
8. What is a complete subject?
9. Write a complete subject for the following sentence: Sarah
and her sister went to the store.
10. What is a predicate?
11. What is a complete predicate?
12. Write the complete predicate for the following sentence:
We went to Lagoon on Friday.
Slide 31
Test Review
13. What is a simple subject?
14. Write the simple subject for the following sentence: Sarah bought
some cake.
15. What is a simple predicate?
16. Write the simple predicate for the following sentence: She ran from
the dog.
17. What is an independent clause?
18. What is a dependent clause?
19. Write the independent clause for the following sentence: We went to
the store, so we could buy some snacks.
Slide 32
Test Review
20. Write the dependent clause for the following sentence: She went
to Japan, because she looked like everyone else.
21. What is a compound sentence?
22. Write a compound sentence.
23. What is a complex sentence?
24. Write a complex sentence.
25. What are the three conjunctions that are good for combining
sentences?
Slide 33
Complete Subject and Simple Subject Review
The complete subject is all the words in the subject of the sentence.
The most important word is the simple subject. It is usually a noun or a
pronoun.
Rewrite the sentences. Underline the complete subject, circle the
simple subject.
1.
The crow walked the children to the bus stop.
2.
The house sits on a wooded hillside.
3.
His eyes widened as he understood the problem.
4.
The neighbor stormed into Dr. Tollman’s office.
Slide 34
Compound Subject Review
When 2 sentences have different subjects and the same predicate,
you can combine the subjects using the word and. The result is a
compound subject.
• The author worked on the book.
• The illustrator worked on the book.
• The author and illustrator worked on the book
Rewrite each sentence using a compound subject.
1.
Craig cried. Luke cried.
2.
The crow was hungry. The cat was hungry.
Slide 35
Using Complete and Simple Subjects
A Simple Subject is just the noun the sentence is talking about. A Complete
Subject is everything from the beginning of the sentence to the noun.
• The house sits on a wooded hillside.
• Some owners of pet dogs have taught their dogs to sit on command.
Write sentences for each of the complete and simple subjects below.
1. The author of the story _____.
2. Crows
3. One child on the playground____.
4. tree
Slide 40
Noun Review
Nouns are words that name persons, places, things, and
ideas. Concrete nouns identify things that exist in the physical
world. Abstract nouns name things that cannot be touched,
seen, felt, or heard.
In the following list, circle the concrete nouns;
underline the abstract nouns. If the word is not a noun leave
it alone.
father cave
was
is
self-pity
courage
am
quill
hunger
sadness
or
nice
hatchet
survival
candy
Slide 48
End Punctuation Review
The end punctuation of a sentence helps clarify the writer’s meaning.
For example, a statement or a command, a writer uses a period. If a
writer wants the sentence to show strong emotion, then an
exclamation mark is used. If a writer asks a question, the sentence
will end in a question mark.
Rewrite the sentences with correct punctuation.
1. Laura found a sea turtle
2. How happy she was to find it
3. Should she tell her father about the turtle
Slide 49
In the following paragraph, correct the end
punctuation and comma usage. Rewrite the
entire paragraph correctly.
I looked around and there were more gulls gathering
They were silent, watching, waiting, and I knew well
enough what they were waiting for I pulled away
more of the seaweed and I saw that the gulls had
been at him already
Slide 50
Commas in Compound Sentences
A comma is used to set off a word or group of words from other
words in the same sentence. In a compound sentence, a comma
and a conjunction are used to “join” the two sentences.
• Laura found a turtle, and she realized she had to help him.
Rewrite the sentences. Put the comma in the correct place.
1. Laura tried to help the turtle but he would not move.
2. She covered him with sand and then he got better.
Slide 51
Commas with Nouns
Commas are used to set off a group of words from the
rest of the sentence. They set off items in a series. A series is
3 or more words or groups of words listed together in a
sentence. A comma is used after each item in the series
except the last.
• We packed ham, salad, pickles, and chips.
• Mom, Dad, and Virginia were waiting in the car.
Slide 52
Commas with Nouns Practice
Rewrite each sentence placing a comma in the correct
places.
1. Eleanor Joe and Terry work at Stewart Beach Aquarium.
2. Eleanor gives tours on Monday Tuesday and Wednesday.
3. The aquarium has been attracting students teachers and
tourists.
4. Stewart Beach Aquarium is easy to reach by train bus or car.
Slide 53
Review Complete and Simple Subject
Complete Subject: All the words in the subject of the sentence. All
the words from the beginning of the sentence to the noun.
Simple Subject: The most important word in the complete subject,
usually a noun or pronoun.
Rewrite the following sentences. Underline the Complete
Subject, circle the Simple Subject.
1. The forest was a beautiful place.
2. A huge ship spilled oil along the shoreline.
3. The extremely delicate environment was damaged.
Slide 54
Complete Predicate and Simple Predicate Review
Complete Predicate: all the words in the predicate, from the
verb to the end of the sentence.
Simple Predicate: the most important word in the complete
predicate, the verb.
Rewrite the following sentences. Underline the complete
predicate, circle the simple predicate.
1. The wildfire was hurt by the spill.
2. The fishermen demanded that the company clean up.
3. The community started the cleanup themselves.
Slide 55
Complete and Simple Subjects and Predicates
Rewrite the sentences below. Circle the complete subject
and underline the complete predicate.
We can clean up after ourselves.
1. We can pick up the trash.
2. Our class can write a clean-up newsletter.
3. We can recycle used paper.
Slide 56
Test Review
1. What is a complete subject?
2. Write the complete subject for the following sentence.
Underwater photographers record the mysteries below
the water.
3. What is a simple subject?
4. Write the simple subject for the following sentence.
The secrets of the ocean are being explored.
Slide 57
5. What is a compound subject?
6. Write the compound subject for the following
sentence. Tammy and Jim are partners on this project
7. Define a common noun.
8. List five common nouns.
9. Write the common nouns for the following sentence.
There was a pencil on that desk.
10. What is a proper noun?
Slide 58
11. Write three proper nouns.
12. Write the proper noun for the following sentence. We
are going to play at Parker’s Fun House.
13. Write the definition of a noun.
14. Write the nouns for the following sentence. There was
a dog, a cat, and a bird at the pet store.
15. What is a plural noun?
16. Write a sentence that uses a plural noun.
Slide 59
17. What is a possessive noun?
18. Write the following words as possessives.
dogs
children
men
pigs
mouse
19. What 2 sentences kinds can end with a period?
20. Write a sentence for each answer in question 19.
21. What kind of sentence can end with a question mark?
22. Write a sentence for your answer in question 21.
23. What kind of sentence can end with an exclamation point?
Slide 60
24. Write a sentence for your answer for question 23.
25. What is a comma?
26. What is a compound sentence?
27. Write a compound sentence and put the comma in the correct
place.
28. Put the commas in the correct places. I want to eat a
banana an apple a piece of cake and a sucker.
29. What is a complete predicate?
30. Write the complete predicate for the following sentence. The
dog was running around his pen.
Slide 61
Subject Verb Agreement
The subject and verb must work together, or agree. A
sentence with a singular subject must have a verb that
agrees with it. A sentence with a plural subject must have a
verb that agrees with a plural subject.
• For a singular subject, add s or es to most verbs: Julianna
rides her bike.
• For a plural subject, do not add s or es to the verb: Her
parents watch from the porch.
Slide 62
•
For compound subjects joined by and or both, use the verb
form for a plural subject: Julianna and her sister have new
bikes.
•
For compound subjects joined by or, either/or, neither/or the
verb must agree with the subject closest to it: Neither Julianna
nor her sister wants to wait.
Choose the verb that correctly completes each sentence.
1. The fishermen sets up booms.
2. In some spots, the oil splash over the booms.
3. Thousands of dead murres, loons, and other birds washes ashore.
Slide 63
Practice Subject Verb Agreement
Write the correct form of the verb to complete the
sentence.
1. The company (search, searches) the seas for old sunken
ships.
2. They (find, finds) special maps.
3. First, people (look, looks) for clues to find ships that were
lost.
4. Next boats (survey, surveys) likely seas.
Slide 64
Review Complete and Simple Predicates
The complete predicate tells what the subject is or does. It
can be one word or more than one word. The most
important word in the complete predicate is the verb, which
is called the simple predicate.
Circle the simple predicate, underline the complete predicate.
1. Everyone said that Elizabeth Blackwell would never be a doctor.
2.
People told her a woman’s place was in the home.
3.
Elizabeth Blackwell never gave up her fight.
Slide 65
Review Compound Predicates
When two sentences have the same subject, the predicates
can be combines to form one sentence.
The amendment forbid slaver and made citizens of all slaves.
Rewrite the following sentences. Write yes after those that have
compound predicates and no that do not.
1. Elizabeth Blackwell studied her books and worked hard.
2. The students laughed and jeered.
3. They denied her request, and she was upset.
Slide 8
Writing Different Kinds of Sentences
Write a paragraph about someone you admire. You need
to use one of each sentence kind (declarative, imperative,
exclamatory, interrogative)
I admire my father. He is a super guy! When he comes home
from work, he says, “Can I help you with your homework?”
On the weekends, we go skating in the park. He always tells
me feed the cat. I love my dad very much.
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