Introduction to
Leadership
Skills for
Troops
“Training boy leaders to run their troop is the
Scoutmaster's most important job.”
“Train Scouts to do a job, then let them do it.”
“Never do anything a boy can do.”
—Robert S. S. Baden-Powell
2
Life Skills in a Values-Based
Environment
Scouting is a values-based program with its own code of
conduct. The Scout Oath and Law help instill the values
of good conduct and honesty. A boy who spends one
year in a Scout troop will learn lifetime skills. He will
learn basic outdoor skills, self-reliance, and how to get
along with others. Scouting will prepare him to live a
more productive and fulfilling life.
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Leadership in Boy Scouting
Scouting offers young people a rich and varied
arena in which to learn and use leadership skills.
 Organizing the troop and patrols
 Using duty rosters
 Planning menus and figuring food costs
 Encouraging advancement
 Guiding a patrol's involvement in problem solving
 Teaching outdoor skills
 Ensuring patrol safety during outings
 Handling patrol finances
 Helping other Boy Scouts make the most of their own
leadership opportunities
 Encouraging participation
4
Introduction to Leadership
Skills for Troops (ILST)
One—Unit Organization
Two—Tools of the Trade
Three—Leadership and Teamwork
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Scoutmaster Expectations
• Live by the Scout Oath and the Scout Law.
• Set a good example (uniform, language, behavior).
• Participate in Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops.
• Devote the time necessary to handle the responsibilities of the
position.
• Work with other troop leaders to make the troop successful.
• Attend the council National Youth Leadership Training course
(a leadership growth opportunity) if he has not already done so.
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Module One
One—Unit Organization
•The Boy-Led Troop & Living the Scout Oath & Law
• Troop Organization
• Leadership positions/roles and responsibilities
• Introductions to Mission and Vision
•Team Based Troop
• Introduction to Servant Leadership
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Mission Statement
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare
young people to make ethical and moral choices over
their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the
Scout Oath and Law.
Mission
Prepare young people to make ethical and moral
choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the
values of the Scout Oath and Law.
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BSA Vision
The Boy Scouts of America is the nation’s foremost youth
program of character development and values-based
leadership training.
In the future, Scouting will continue to:
•
Offer young people responsible fun and adventure;
•
Instill in young people lifetime values and develop in
them ethical character as expressed in the Scout Oath
and Law;
•
Train young people in citizenship, service, and
leadership;
•
Serve America’s communities and families with its
quality, values-based program.
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Troop Vision
Our troop will be a premier youth-led and adultsupported organization postured toward developing
lifelong skills in boys and helping them to develop into
men of character.
They will possess Scouting and citizen skills; adhere to
the Scout Oath and Scout Law; serve their families,
schools, communities and nation; and help others to
achieve Scouting’s goals.
And they will do this through an exciting and challenging
Scouting program.
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What does it mean when we say
“a boy-led troop”?
The BSA's definition is that “empowering boys
to be leaders” is the core of Scouting.
A Boy Scout troop is a small democracy. With
the Scoutmaster's direction, the boys are formed
into patrols, plan the troop's program, and make
it a reality.
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TROOP ORGANIZATION CHART
for a Large Troop
Assistant
Scoutmaster
New Scout
Scoutmaster
Junior
Assistant
Scoutmaster
Assistant
Senior Patrol
Leader
Assistant
Scoutmaster
Venture
Senior Patrol
Leader
Patrol Leaders
Council
Troop Guide
New-Scout
Patrol Leader
Den Chief
OA Troop
Representative
Instructor
Patrol Leader
Patrol Leader
Patrol Leader
Assistant
Patrol Leader
Assistant
Patrol Leader
Assistant
Patrol Leader
Patrol
Scribe
Quartermaster
Grubmaster
Cheermaster
Patrol
Scribe
Quartermaster
Grubmaster
Cheermaster
Patrol
Scribe
Quartermaster
Grubmaster
Cheermaster
Quartermaster
Scribe
Librarian
Historian
Venture Patrol
Chaplain 12
Aide
TROOP ORGANIZATION CHART
for a Small Troop
Scoutmaster
Assistant
Scoutmaster
New Scout
Assistant
Scoutmaster
Venture
Senior Patrol
Leader
Patrol Leaders
Council
Troop Guide
New-Scout
Patrol Leader
Assistant
Senior Patrol
Leader
Den Chief
Patrol Leader
Venture Patrol
Assistant
Patrol Leader
Quartermaster
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SENIOR PATROL LEADER
Position description: Elected by the Scouts to represent them as
the top youth leader in the troop.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster
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SENIOR PATROL LEADER
Duties:
• Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual
program planning conference.
• Chairs the Patrol Leaders Council meeting.
• Appoints other troop youth leaders with the advice and counsel
of the Scoutmaster.
• Assigns duties and responsibilities to youth leaders.
• Assists the Scoutmaster with youth leadership training.
• Set and enforce the tone for good Scout behavior .
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically wears the Scout uniform correctly.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows and help develop Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster
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ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER
Position description: Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader with
the approval of the Scoutmaster. Acts as the Senior Patrol Leader
in his absence or when called upon. He also provides leadership to
other youth leaders in the troop.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader
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ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER
Duties:
• Helps the Senior Patrol Leader lead meetings and activities.
• Runs the troop in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.
• Helps train and supervise the troop scribe, quartermaster,
instructor, librarian, historian, and chaplain's aide.
• Serves as a member of the Patrol Leaders Council.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
• Lives the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
• Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit.
• Wears the uniform correctly.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader
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PATROL LEADER
Position description: Appointed/elected leader of his patrol. He
represents his patrol on the Patrol Leaders Council.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader
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PATROL LEADER
Duties:
• Appoints the assistant Patrol Leader.
• Represents the patrol on the Patrol Leaders Council.
• Plans and steers patrol meetings.
• Helps Scouts advance.
• Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts.
• Keeps patrol members informed.
• Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do.
• Sets the example.
• Wears the uniform correctly.
• Lives the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Senior Patrol Leader
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ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER
Position description: Appointed by the Patrol Leader and leads
the patrol in his absence.
Reports to: The Patrol Leader
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ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER
Duties:
•
Helps the Patrol Leader plan and steer patrol meetings and
activities.
•
Helps him keep patrol members informed.
•
Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities.
•
Represents his patrol at Patrol Leaders Council meetings when
the Patrol Leader cannot attend.
Reports to: The Patrol Leader
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TROOP QUARTERMASTER
Position description: Manages troop equipment and sees that it is
in good working order.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP QUARTERMASTER
Duties:
•
Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment.
•
Makes sure equipment is in good working condition.
•
Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good
condition.
•
Makes suggestions for new or replacement items.
•
Works with the troop committee member responsible for
equipment.
•
Sets a good example.
•
Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP SCRIBE
Position description: Keeps the troop records. He records the
activities of the Patrol Leaders Council and keeps a record of dues,
advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP SCRIBE
Duties:
•
Attends and keeps a log of Patrol Leaders Council meetings.
•
Records individual Scout attendance and dues payments.
•
Records individual Scout advancement progress.
•
Works with the troop committee member responsible for
records and finance.
•
Sets a good example.
•
Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP HISTORIAN
Position description: Preserves troop photographs, news stories,
trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP HISTORIAN
Duties:
•
Gathers pictures and facts about troop activities and keeps
them in a historical file or scrapbook.
•
Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop
activities.
•
Keeps information about former members of the troop.
•
Sets a good example.
•
Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP LIBRARIAN
Position description: Oversees the care and use of troop books,
pamphlets, magazines, audiovisuals, and merit badge books.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP LIBRARIAN
Duties:
•
Sets up and takes care of a troop library.
•
Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop.
•
Adds new or replacement items as needed.
•
Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing.
•
Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out,
and follows up on late returns.
•
Sets a good example.
•
Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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TROOP GUIDE
Position description: Works with new Scouts and helps them feel
comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year.
Appointed by the Scoutmaster.
Reports to: The Assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol
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TROOP GUIDE
Duties:
• Introduces new Scouts to troop operations.
• Helps new Scouts earn First Class rank in their first year.
• Teaches basic Scout skills.
• Coaches the Patrol Leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties.
• Attends Patrol Leaders Council meetings with the Patrol Leader
of the new-Scout patrol.
• Counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol
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INSTRUCTOR
Position description: Teaches Scouting skills. Appointed by the
Scoutmaster.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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INSTRUCTOR
Duties:
• Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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CHAPLAIN AIDE
Position description: Works with the troop chaplain to meet the
religious needs of Scouts in the troop. He also works to promote
the religious emblems program. Appointed by the Scoutmaster.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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CHAPLAIN AIDE
Duties:
• Assists the troop chaplain with religious services at troop
activities.
• Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith.
• Makes sure religious holidays are considered during the troop
program planning process.
• Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities.
• Sets a good example.
• Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
• Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
• Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader
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DEN CHIEF
Position description: Works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos
Scouts, and den leaders in the Cub Scout pack.
Reports to: The Den Leader in the pack and the Assistant
Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop.
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DEN CHIEF
Duties:
•
Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting.
•
Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks.
•
Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop.
•
Is a friend to the boys in the den.
•
Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings.
•
Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as
necessary.
•
Sets the example.
•
Wears the uniform correctly.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Den Leader in the pack and the Assistant
Scoutmaster for the new-Scout patrol in the troop
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JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER
Position description: Serves in the capacity of an Assistant
Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required. He
must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18. He is appointed by the
Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster
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JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER
Duties:
•
Functions as an assistant Scoutmaster.
•
Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.
•
Sets a good example.
•
Enthusiastically and correctly wears the Scout uniform.
•
Lives by the Scout Oath and Law.
•
Shows Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster
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ORDER OF THE ARROW TROOP REPRESENTATIVE
Duties:
Serve as a communication link between the lodge or chapter and
the troop.
• Encourage year-round and resident camping in the troop.
• Encourage older-Scout participation in high-adventure programs.
• Encourage Scouts to actively participate in community service
projects.
• Assist with leadership skills training in the troop.
• Encourage Arrowmen to assume leadership positions in the troop.
• Encourage Arrowmen in the troop to be active participants in
lodge and/or chapter activities and to seal their membership in the
Order by becoming Brotherhood members.
• Set a good example.
• Wear the Scout uniform correctly.
• Live by the Scout Oath, Scout Law, and OA Obligation.
• Show and help develop Scout spirit.
Reports to: The Scoutmaster
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THE SCOUT-LED TROOP
What are the DRIVING FORCES
for a successful boy-led troop?
The Scout Oath and The Scout Law
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What is Leadership?
• Teamwork
• Using each other’s strengths
• Not trying to do it all yourself
• Doing what you said you’d do
• Being reliable
• Keeping each other informed
• Being responsible
• Caring for others
• Delegating
• Setting the example
• Praising in public, criticizing in private
• Leading yourself
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Patrol Leader’s Council
• Patrol leaders’ council plan and run the troop’s program & activities.
• Composed of specific members of the troop leadership team
• Scout leaders meets routinely to fine-tune upcoming troop
meetings and outings.
• Senior patrol leader runs the patrol leaders’ council meeting
• Scoutmaster and other adult leaders attend as coaches, mentors,
and information resources.
• Scoutmaster allows the senior patrol leader and Scouts to run the
meetings and make decisions, stepping in with suggestions and
guidance whenever that will enhance the program for the troop and
Scouts.
“The object of the patrol method is not so
much saving the Scoutmaster trouble as to
give responsibility to the boy.”
—Robert S. S. Baden-Powell
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Servant Leader
Why should YOU become a leader?
Qualities of a servant leader:
Listening
Empathy
Healing
Awareness
Persuasion
Conceptualization
Foresight
Stewardship
Growth
Building community
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What do the Scouts think?
You need to find out!
Get to know the Scouts you lead.
What do they want?
What do they need?
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Module Two
Tools of the Trade
• Communication
• Planning
•Teaching EDGE
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Communications
• Discussion: The Greek philosopher Aristotle broke
communications down into three parts:
• A sender—A message—A receiver. This is still a valid model today.
It applies to all forms of communication: verbal, written, music, film,
signaling, pantomime, teaching, etc.
• Receiving (Listening). Understanding the value of being a good
receiver is a helpful foundation for a leader.
51
Planning
• Planning is figuring out what it will take to make that come together
smoothly
• Ask questions—develop answers
• “what do we do if ‘x’ happens?
• “Who is responsible for making that part happen?”
• Don’t presume that something needed will be there or just happen
• Check on it—then you’ll know that it’s taken care of
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Tools for successful troops:
 Troop calendar
 Troop meetings
 Troop activities
 Patrol Leaders Council
 Public service
 Outdoor activities
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Patrols are successful through:
 Patrol meetings
 Patrol activities
 Patrol names / patches / yells
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“The patrol method is not a way to operate
a Boy Scout troop, it is the only way.
Unless the patrol method is in operation,
you don't really have a Boy Scout troop.”
—Robert S. S. Baden-Powell
55
National Honor Patrol Award
Awarded to patrols whose members make an extra effort
to have the best patrol possible. A patrol can earn the award
by doing the following over a three-month period:
1.
Have a patrol name, flag, and yell. Put the patrol design on
equipment, and use the patrol yell. Keep patrol records up-to-date.
2.
Hold two patrol meetings every month.
3.
Take part in at least one hike, outdoor activity, or other Scouting
event.
4.
Complete two Good Turns or service projects approved by the patrol
leaders’ council.
5.
Help two patrol members advance one rank.
6.
Wear the full uniform correctly at troop activities (at least 75 percent
of patrol’s membership).
7.
Have a representative attend at least three Patrol Leaders Council
meetings.
8.
Have eight members in the patrol or experience an increase in
patrol membership.
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What is EDGE?
A method you will use to teach in your troop. The
key to making EDGE work is to use it for all
teaching opportunities. Make it a habit.
1. Explain—The trainer explains how something
is done.
2. Demonstrate—After the trainer explains, the
trainer demonstrates while explaining again.
3. Guide—The learner tries the skill while the
trainer guides him through it.
4. Enable—The trainee works on his own under the
watchful eye of the trainer. The trainer’s role in
this step is to remove any obstacles to success,
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which enables the learner to succeed.
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Module Three
Leadership and Teamwork
• Introduction to Leadership and Teamwork
• Teams and Team Characteristics
• Stages and Team Development
• Inclusion
• Leadership Ethics and Values
• Vision
• Wrap up ILST
61
Intro to Leadership and
Teamwork
•What do we mean by “team”?
Definition: The word “team” applies to any group
working together on a
common goal.
62
Teams &Team Characteristics
• Common Purpose
• Interdependence
• Appropriate Roles, Structure, and Process
• Leadership and Competence
• Team Climate
• Performance Standards
• Clarity and Understanding of Boundaries
63
Stages & Team Development
Where the group is?
Team Skill Level and Enthusiasm
• Skill Level—Generally, the skill level of the team starts
low and increases as the team grows together and gets
better at working as a team.
• Enthusiasm—Often, unlike skill level, enthusiasm
usually starts out high but can then
take a sudden dip. Then, as the team members explore
their differences and align their expectations with reality,
the team begins to achieve results and enthusiasm
begins to rise again.
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Inclusion
• As a leader, learning to effectively include, engage, and
use each member of your team is an important skill.
• Leaders want to look at their team and see how best to
involve and use the skills of every person, not just a few
friends or the strongest individuals.
• Leaders also want to understand the needs and goals
of each individual person and how all the members of
the team can help each team member achieve their
individual goals.
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Leadership Ethics & Values
• Boy Scout Handbook
• Scout Oath On my honor . . . as a leader …I will do
my best . . . as a leader …to do my duty . . . as a
leader… to God and my country . . . as a leader
…and to obey the Scout Law . . . as a leader to help
other people at all times . . . as a leader… to keep
myself physically strong . . . as a leader …mentally
awake . . . as a leader… and morally straight . . . as a
leader…
• Scout Law
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Servant Leaders
• Need to listen and know when the time for discussion
is over .
• Achieve consensus and know when to preserve things
that are good without foundering in a constant storm of
question and reinvention.
• Set/maintain standards and know when to reject what
does not maintain those standards or the team vision.
• Serve their customers and know how to make a
difference with the team.
Please think about how you can be a
servant leader in your current role in
the troop
68
How do you know if you’re doing
your job (and doing it well)?
Who do you answer to?
Your Troop supervisor/boss
Your parents
Your teachers
Your God (as you understand Him)
Your Self
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Translating the Troop Vision …
… into your Personal Vision 70
Vision
Our troop will be a premier youth-led and adultsupported organization postured toward developing
lifelong skills in boys and helping them to develop into
men of character.
They will possess Scouting and citizen skills; adhere to
the Scout Oath and Scout Law; serve their families,
schools, communities and nation; and help others to
achieve Scouting’s goals.
And they will do this through an exciting and challenging
Scouting program.
71
You are now officially trained in
your leadership position.
For you as a leader,
now the hard stuff starts.
Earn your position…
Congratulations!
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Start, Stop, Continue?
Start
What should we start doing that we are not currently
doing?
Stop
What do we stop doing that is not working?
Continue
What should we continue doing that is working well and
helps us succeed?
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Troop 69 Leadership Training