This presentation is intended for use by
trainers with a working knowledge of the GHS
and older labelling and classification systems
in Australia
The Globally Harmonized System of
Classification and Labelling of Chemicals
This presentation is released under the Creative Commons
Attribution 3.0 Australia Licence and may be reused and
redistributed free of charge.
For more information see www.swa.gov.au/sites/swa/copyright
Part 2:
Classifying Hazardous Chemicals to the GHS
The relationship between the GHS, the ADG Code and the
NOHSC Approved Criteria
Part 2: Classifying chemicals according to the GHS (1 hour)
•
•
•
What is classification?
Where do I get information to help me classify
Cut-off limits
•
Practical Example classifications
• Single chemical
• Mixtures
•
Questions (feel free to ask at any time).
4
What this workshop will teach you
•
This session is aimed at providing you with the information to enable you to reclassify chemicals which have a classification under the older Australian Regulatory
frameworks to the requirements of the GHS under the WHS legislation.
•
In order to gain the most from this session, you need to have a basic understanding
of the GHS, its hazard classes, pictograms and other labelling elements and previous
regulatory frameworks for chemical classification.
What this workshop won’t teach you
•
•
Epidemiological assessments, weight of evidence classifications or interpreting data
from animal or other studies to obtain a classification.
Bridging principles for classifying mixtures. Although classification of mixtures is
discussed, bridging principles for the classification of health effects of mixtures will
not be. They can be complex and their usefulness is not always clear
5
What you will need for this workshop
A copy of:
•
Guidance on the Classification of Hazardous Chemicals Under the WHS Regulations
and
•
•
•
Code of Practice: Labelling of Workplace Hazardous Chemicals, or
Code of Practice: Preparation of Safety Data Sheets for Hazardous Chemicals, or
Classification and labelling for workplace hazardous chemicals poster
and
•
Acute toxicity hazard categories and ATE values from GHS – table 3.1.1 in GHS text
•
optionally the GHS, 3rd Revised Edition (The Purple Book).
6
Classification
What is classification?
•
•
Classification is the process of determining the intrinsic physical, health and
environmental hazards of a chemical.
• The GHS provides pre-defined hazard classes and appropriate sub-categories.
•
Obtaining correct classification is important – for labelling and SDS.
• Label and safety data sheet follow.
• It is also a requirement under the WHS Regulations
The systems used prior to GHS are based on two separate (but related), systems.
• Dangerous Goods - ADG Code, 7th Edition
• Physical hazards, acute toxicity, corrosion and environmental hazards
•
Hazardous Substances - NOHSC approved criteria (AC)
• Health hazards
• Also included physical hazards and environmental hazards
7
(Re)-Classification
•
There is close alignment of most GHS classes with the ADG Code and the AC.
• GHS physical hazards are (almost) the same as the ADG Code.
• GHS health hazards have a great deal of overlap with the AC.
•
Because this close alignment exists, the classification of chemicals under the ADG
Code and the AC can be translated to a GHS classification.
•
Guidance on the Classification of Hazardous Chemicals under the WHS Regulations
• Provides a translation for most ADG Code / AC to GHS classes.
If you have actual data on a chemical, it should be used for classification.
8
Converting ADG Code  GHS classification
e.g. Class 3  Flammable Liquids & Division 4.1  Flammable Solids
•
The transport classification can be found on the safety data sheet in section 14.
•
A substance or mixture with an ADG classification is (essentially) already classified for
GHS physical hazards.
9
Conversion of Approved Criteria  GHS Classification
e.g. R23 Toxic by inhalation  Acute toxicity - inhalation
•
•
•
R-phrase to H-statement conversion
GHS health hazards have a broadly similar scope to the Approved Criteria
There are some differences to be aware of.
10
Some issues with health hazards translation
Not all of the end-points for classification are the same and there is some overlap.
Acute toxicity (vapours) - inhalation
20
20
Cat. 4
10
10
Xn,
R20
Cat. 3
LC50 / mg/m3
•
2
1
Cat. 2
T, R23
0.5
Cat. 1
0.1
GHS
T+,
R26
App. Crit.
Always check for data on SDS on toxicological information (usually section 11).
Become familiar with the Acute Toxicity table in the GHS (p. 109).
11
Environmental Hazard Classification
e.g. R50/53  Acute/chronic aquatic toxicity
•
Environmental classification can usually be found in the SDS (sections 14 and 15).
12
GHS Hazard Classes
•
The WHS Regulations refers specifically to the 3rd revision of the GHS
•
All hazard classes except the following are included in the WHS Regulations:
• Acute toxicity – oral/dermal/inhalation: Category 5
• Skin corrosion/irritation: Category 3
• Serious eye damage/irritation: Category 2B
• Aspiration hazard: Category 2
• Flammable gases: Category 2
• Acute hazard to the aquatic environment: Categories 1 – 3 (all)
• Chronic hazard to the aquatic environment: Categories 1 – 4 (all)
• Hazardous to the ozone layer
•
However, can use these hazard classes and associated label elements if they do not
cast doubt upon the correct classification.
Building block approach.
•
13
Supplementary Australian Hazard Classes
•
In addition to the GHS Hazard Classes, several additional classification have been
adopted in Australia.
AUH001 – Explosive when dry
AUH006 – Explosive with or without contact with air
AUH014 – Reacts violently with water
AUH018 – In use may form flammable/explosive vapour/air mixture
AUH029 – Contact with water liberates toxic gas
AUH031 – Contact with acid liberates toxic gas
AUH032 – Contact with acid liberates very toxic gas
AUH044 – Risk of explosion if heated under confinement
AUH066 – Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness and cracking
AUH070 – Toxic by eye contact
AUH071 – Corrosive to the respiratory tract
•
•
•
Criteria found in the Classification Guide Appendices E&F and Codes of Practice for
Labelling and Safety Data Sheets
There are no labelling elements associated with these hazards
Most of these categories are also in the Approved Criteria (except AUH070 and AUH071)
14
Classification
Where can I get the information to allow re-classification?
•
For the majority of chemicals currently used in Australia, a classification under the
ADG / AC will likely already exist.
•
•
Labelling
Safety data sheets – relevant information to consult includes:
• R-phrases / hazard symbols
• Transport information (Dangerous Goods Classification / UN numbers)
• Physical and chemical properties
• mp / bp / fp / pH / LEL and UELs, etc.
• Toxicological information
• LD50 / LC50 for oral / dermal / inhalation routes of exposure
• Carcinogenicity / mutagenicity information
• Sensitisation / skin and eye corrosion / target organs, etc.
• Ecological information (for environmental hazards)
• Reactivity / stability data (may assist with non-GHS hazard classes)
15
Classification
Where can I get the information to allow re-classification?
•
Overseas classifications
•
Beware: there are some differences in the “building blocks” between some
countries.
Extra:
Flammable gases: Cat. 2
Eye irritation: Cat. 2B
Out:
Flammable liquids: Cat. 4
Enviro:
Acute aq. tox: Cat. 1
Chronic aq. tox: Cat. 1-4
Ozone
Non-GHS:
Same extra categories
Extra:
Flammable gases: Cat. 2
Eye irritation: Cat. 2B
Out:
----
Enviro:
Non-mandatory
EU vs. AU
USA vs. AU
16
Classification
Where can I get the information to allow re-classification?
•
Online database and tools are also available to assist you in classifying workplace
hazardous chemicals.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chemical suppliers’ websites
Annex VI to CLP (http://esis.jrc.ec.europa.eu)
Online translation tools (e.g. http://www.gischem.de/ghs/index.htm)
HSIS (http://hsis.safeworkaustralia.gov.au)
eChemportal (http://www.echemportal.org)
GREAT (http://great.cla.gov.tw/ENG/index.aspx)
Further information available on our website: www.swa.gov.au
17
Classification – Single substances – and (some) mixtures
Process for classification using translation of R-phrase to H-statement
Chemical
needing
classification
Gather all
information
available
Does the
chemical have a
classification
under ADG/AC
or (EU dir)?
Use translation
tables to derive
classifications
Classify the
chemical
Is testing data
available?
Classify the
chemical
Can’t classify.
Need further
information to
proceed.
Possibly
not hazardous
18
Classification of mixtures
•
For mixtures the translation process will provide adequate classification in the
majority of cases – if cut-off limits are not a problem.
•
•
The translation of physical hazards should be straightforward.
However, changes to some cut-off concentrations and the way in which
chemicals in some categories contribute to the classification may affect some
cases.
You need to be aware of the cut-off limits under the GHS vs. the AC.
Beware!
• If the GHS cut-off limit is lower than its equivalent in the AC, direct translation
could result in non-classification.
• If the GHS cut-off limit is higher than its equivalent in the AC, direct
translation could result in over-classification.
• Specified cut-off limits in HSIS do not apply under WHS Regulations!
19
Classification of mixtures
Cut-off limit comparison  reproductive toxicity
•
Cut-off limits and special instructions can be found in each health hazard chapter
of the GHS.
GHS
Mixture classification
Ingredient
classification
Reproductive tox.
Category 1
Reproductive tox.
Category 2
Effects on or via
lactation
Toxic to
reproduction
Cat. 1
Toxic to
reproduction
Cat. 2
Effects
on
lactation
≥0.3%
≥3.0%
≥0.3%
NOHSC approved criteria
Mixture classification
Reproductive tox.
Reproductive tox
Ingredient
R60 or R61
R62 or R63
classification
Sol/Liq
Gas
Sol/Liq
Gas
Category 1 or 2
R60 (fert) or R61
(dev)
Category 3
R62 (fert) or R63
(dev)
Harmful Xn
R64
≥0.5%
Harmful Xn
R64
n/a
≥0.2%
≥5.0%
≥1.0%
≥1.0%
•
•
Further, the WHS Regulations implements some specific cut-off concentrations.
These changes are detailed Schedule 6 of the WHS Regulations or in Appendix G of
the Classification Guidance Document
•
Follow the decision logic in each chapter of the GHS.
20
Classification of mixtures
Mixtures not classified under AC which would be under GHS
Mixtures
containing
10 – 20%
1 – 3%
3 – 5%
10 – 20%
3 – 5%
0.3 – 0.5%
of substances
classified with
R38 ( Skin Irr. 2)
R34 (Skin Irr. 2 & Eye Irr. 2)
R34 ( Skin Irr. 2 & Eye Dam. 1)
R36 ( Eye Irr. 2)
R62 or R63 ( Repr. 2)
R60 or R61 ( Repr. 1)
You need to be aware of the cut-off limits under the GHS vs. the AC.
Manufacturer should be able to supply the information needed to classify
properly.
21
Classification of mixtures
Acute Toxicity Estimate
To estimate the toxicity of components in a mixture, the GHS provides a formula

=





Where:
ATEmix = Acute toxicity estimate of mixture
ATEi = Acute toxicity estimate of ingredient
Ci = concentration of ingredient
n = number of ingredients from 1 to i
Only need to consider components which are greater than 1 % w/w, unless it is
known there is a health effect at a lower level.
22
Classification of mixtures (where cut-offs are close)
Process for classification
Can’t classify mixture –
contact supplier to
obtain more
information
Mixture
needing
classification
Gather all
information
available
Use known and/or
derived GHS
classification of
individual
components
Test data on
similar
mixtures?
Is hazard data
available for
some or all
components?
Is testing data
available?
Can bridging
principles be
applied?
Classify the
mixture –
according to cutoff limits
Classify the
mixture
Classify the
mixture
23
Classification examples
9 examples of reclassifying substances or mixtures according to the GHS
For each example, provide label elements: Hazard classes and categories; Signal word;
Pictograms; Hazard statements.
Use reference materials to assist you assigning the label elements.
Return for discussion and answer session
24
Classification – Single substances
Example 1: pH Indicator
A laboratory chemicals supplier is re-classifying its products to the GHS. The regulatory compliance
officer extracted the following salient data on its classification. What would the classification be under
the GHS? Provide the associated signal words, pictograms and H-statements?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
Transport information:
Div. 6.1 PG III
Acute toxicity: Cat. 3 (oral, dermal, inhalation?)
Risk phrases:
R25 – Toxic if swallowed
R40 – Limited evidence of a carcinogenic effect
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 2
Other useful information:
LD50 oral – rat – 200 mg/kg
mp = 111°C
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
25
Classification
Example 1: pH Indicator: Answer
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER + WARNING
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 2
H301 Toxic if swallowed
H351 Suspected of causing cancer
Pictograms:
26
Classification
Example 2: Disinfecting agent
A manufacturer of a solid disinfecting chemical agent is re-classifying from ADG/AC to comply with the
requirements of the GHS under the WHS Regulations. The following ADG/AC classification
information is available. What would the classification of this compound be under the GHS?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
Transport information:
Div 5.1 PG II
Oxidising solids: Cat. 2
Risk phrases:
R8 – contact with combustible material may
cause fire
R22 – harmful if swallowed
R50/53 – very toxic to aquatic organisms, may
cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic
environment
No translation possible (but covered by
DG classification)
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 4
Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat.1
Other useful information:
LD50 oral – rat – 1090 mg/kg
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 4
27
Classification
Example 2: Disinfecting agent: Answer
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Oxidising solids: Cat. 2
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 4
H272 May intensify fire; oxidiser
H302 Harmful if swallowed
Pictograms:
Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
H410
H400 Very toxic to aquatic life with
long
H410lasting
Very toxic
effects
to aquatic life with
long lasting effects
28
Classification
Example 3: Plastics starting material
A safety officer at a plastics manufacturer is reviewing the classifications of its products and raw
materials to comply with the GHS requirements of the WHS Regulations. After extracting the
necessary information from the SDS and labelling, this chemical was reclassified. What should the
classification be?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
Div. 6.1 (3) PG II
Acute toxicity: Cat. 2 (plus Flammable liquid)
R45 – may cause cancer
R23/24/25 – toxic by inhalation, in
contact with skin and if swallowed
R10 – flammable
R34 – causes burns
R43 – may cause sens. by skin contact
Carcinogenicity: Cat.1B
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 2 (use vapour)
Acute toxicity – Dermal/Oral: Cat. 3
Flammable liquids: Cat. 3
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B
Skin sensitisation: Cat. 1
LD50 oral – rat – 90 mg/kg
LC50 inhalation (4h) – rat – 3.1 mg/L
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 3
Probably carcinogenic to humans
bp = 115°C / fp 32°C
29
Classification
Example 3: Plastics starting material: Answer
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 1B
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 3
Acute toxicity – Dermal: Cat. 3
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 3
Flammable liquids: Cat. 3
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B
H350 May cause cancer
H301+H311+H331 Toxic if inhaled, if
swallowed and in contact with skin
Skin sensitisation: Cat. 1
H226 Flammable liquid and vapour
H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye
damage
H317 May cause an allergic skin reaction
Pictograms:
Precedence rules for pictograms
See Codes of Practice
30
Classification
Example 4: Bulk supply of solvent
A solvent supplier provides delivery of solvents in drums of 200 L in volume. These drums are
transported directly to workplaces on pallets in a truck. How should this solvent be classified and
labelled?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Div. 3 PG II
R45 – may cause cancer
R46 – may cause heritable genetic damage
R48/23/24/25 – toxic: danger of serious damage to
health through prolonged exposure through
inhalation, in contact with skin and if swallowed
R65 – harmful: may cause lung damage if swallowed
R11 – highly flammable
R36/38 – irritating to eyes and skin
Flammable liquids: Cat. 2
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 1A
Germ cell mutagenicity: Cat. 1B
STOT Repeated Exposure: Cat. 1
LD50 oral – rat – 2990 mg/kg
LC50 inhalation – rat – 447 mg/l
LD50 dermal – rabbit – 8263 mg/kg
bp = 80°C / fp = -11°C
In vivo test shows mutagenic effect
Known to cause cancer in humans
Acute toxicity – Oral: Not classified
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Not classified
Acute toxicity – Dermal: Not classified
Aspiration hazard: Cat. 1
Flammable liquid: Cat. 2
Eye irritation: Cat. 2A / Skin irritation: Cat. 2
31
Classification
Example 4: Bulk supply of solvent: Answer
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Flammable liquids: Cat. 2
Carcinogenicity: Cat. 1A
Germ cell mutagenicity: Cat. 1B
STOT – Repeated Exposure: Cat. 1
H225 Highly flammable liquid and vapour
H350 May cause cancer
H340 May cause genetic defects
H372 Causes damage to organs through
prolonged or repeated exposure <…>
H304 May be fatal if swallowed and
enters airways
H315 Causes serious eye irritation
H319 Causes skin irritation
Aspiration hazard: Cat. 1
Eye irritation: Cat. 2A
Skin irritation: Cat. 2
Pictograms:
DG label required for transport
32
Classification
Example 5: Compressed gas
A gas manufacturer is re-classifying its products to accord with the GHS. The following data for the
gas is known. The product is supplied in cylinders. How would you classify this gas according to the
GHS?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Div. 2.3 (8)
Acute toxicity (gas) (Sub. risk – corrosive)
R10 – flammable
R23 – toxic by inhalation
R34 – causes burns
R50 – very toxic to aquatic organisms
Flammable gases: Cat. 2 (Not classified)
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 3
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B
Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
LC50 inhalation – rat – 2000 ppmV
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 3
LEL – 15 % v/v / UEL – 25 % v/v
Flammable gases: Cat. 2 (Not classified)
Gases under pressure: Compressed gas
33
Classification
Example 5: Refrigeration gas: Answer
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Gases under pressure: Compressed gas
H280 Contains gas under pressure; may
explode if heated
H331 Toxic if inhaled
H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye
damage
H400 Very toxic to aquatic life
Acute toxicity – Inhalation: Cat. 3
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B
Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Pictograms:
34
Classification
Example 6: Herbicide
How would this herbicide be classified and labelled according to the GHS given the information below
on its classification under the ADG and AC?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Div. 6.1 PG II
Acute toxicity: Cat. 2
R61 – may cause harm to the unborn child
R24 – toxic in contact with skin
R28 – very toxic if swallowed
R44 – risk of explosion if heated under confinement
R50/53 – very toxic to the aquatic environment, may
cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic
environment
Reproductive toxicity: Cat. 1B
Acute toxicity – Dermal: Cat. 3
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 2
No GHS equivalent – AUH044
Acute/chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Presumed human reproductive toxicant
LD50 oral – rat – 26 mg/kg
LD50 dermal – rat – 150 mg/kg
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 2
Acute toxicity – Dermal: Cat. 2
35
Classification
Example 6: Herbicide: Answer
GHS Classification
Acute toxicity – Dermal: Cat. 2
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat. 2
Reproductive toxicity: Cat. 1B
Acute aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 1
Signal Word: DANGER
H300+H310 Fatal if swallowed or in
contact with skin
H360 May damage the unborn child
H410 Very toxic to aquatic life with longlasting effects
Pictograms:
AUH044 Risk of explosion if heated
under confinement
36
Classification of mixtures
Example 7: Alcohol:water solution
The following mixture is a commercially-available rinsing solution used for cleaning scientific
instruments. It is a 50:50 mixture of an alcohol and water. How would this be classified and labelled
under the GHS?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Class 3 PG II
Flammable liquids: Cat. 2
R10 – flammable
R36 – irritating to eyes
R67 – vapours may cause drowsiness
Flammable liquids: Cat. 2
Eye irritation: Cat. 2A
STOT – Single Exposure: Cat. 3
No toxicity data on SDS
fp 22°C
No boiling point data on mixture itself
Bp of alcohol is 82-83°C
37
Classification of mixtures
Examples of classification using translation tables
Example 7: Alcohol : water solution
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Flammable liquid: Cat. 2
Eye irritation: Cat. 2A
STOT – Single exposure: Cat. 3
H225 Highly flammable liquid and vapour
H319 Causes serious eye irritation
H336 May cause drowsiness or dizziness
Pictograms:
Concentration of the alcohol is well above the suggested cut-off limit for STOT-SE 3. In
this case, we can just translate the classification from ADG/AC to GHS with confidence.
Cut-off limits only apply to health hazards in the context of the WHS Regulations.
38
Classification of mixtures
Example 8: Insecticide preparation
A ready-for-bottling herbicide preparation is being supplied from the manufacturing plant to the bottling
plant. It will be stored in bulk containers in the plant’s warehouse for a few weeks until it is processed.
In order to meet the WHS requirements for storage, the preparation requires labelling in accordance
with the regulations prior to it being bottled for consumer use. The active insecticide is present at 0.4
%w/w. What will the GHS classification be? What would happen if the classification was directly
translated from its classification under the previous schemes?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Not classified
Not classified
Not classified as a hazardous substance
Not classified
If we were to directly translate, this preparation would have no classification. Would this be correct?
Care must be taken to take into account the cut-off limits of the GHS. Some cut-off
limits are lower under GHS.
The SDS provides information on individual
ingredients and their proportions.
This allows a classification to be derived by
retrieving data on hazardous components.
39
Classification of mixtures
GHS Classification
To classify this mixture, the GHS classifications and toxicology information can be
obtained from the active ingredient’s SDS.
Pyroglusinate:
(0.4 %w/w)
R60/61: May impair fertility; May harm the unborn child
R20/21/22: Harmful by inhalation, in contact with skin or if swallowed
R48/20/22: Danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure
through inhalation and if swallowed.
LD50 – oral = 1620 mg/kg; LC50 – inhalation = 1260 mg/m3;
LD50 – dermal = 2000 mg/kg
Other components:
(99.6 %w/w)
Not classified as hazardous
•Acute Toxicity – component below 1 %w/w, so no need to consider.
•Apply other cut-off limits in GHS / Regulations to ascertain the classification.
•Breaches cut-off for Reproductive toxicity: Cat. 1
40
Classification of mixtures
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Reproductive toxicity: Cat. 1
H360 May damage fertility or the unborn
child
Pictogram(s):
Always pay attention to cut-off limits.
If GHS cut-off is lower than AC  possible non-classification
If GHS cut-off is higher than AC  possible under-classification
41
Classification of mixtures
Example 9: Rust-removing preparation
The following data relates to a rust-removing preparation. According to the SDS, the material is
classified as a hazardous substance under the AC but there is no dangerous goods classification.
What issues could you face classifying this mixture? What would you do to classify this material to the
GHS and what would its classification be?
Data from SDS / Labelling
GHS Classification
DG Classification – Not classified
Not classified
R36 – Irritating to eyes
R52 – harmful to aquatic organisms
R53 – may cause long term adverse effects in the
aquatic environment
Serious eye irritation: Cat. 2A
Acute/Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 3
Is this classification correct?
Care must be taken when reclassifying mixtures with corrosive components.
Cut-off concentrations are significantly different versus the AC
The SDS provides information on individual
ingredients and their proportions.
This allows a classification to be derived by
retrieving data on hazardous components.
42
Classification of mixtures
GHS Classification
To classify this mixture to the GHS, individual GHS classifications and toxicology
information can be obtained from individual components’ SDSs.
Acid component 1:
(9.95 %w/w)
Eye irritation: Cat. 2A / Skin irritation: Cat. 2
Acute/chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 3
Acid component 2:
(9.95 %w/w)
Acute toxicity – Oral: Cat.4 (LD50 = 1950 mg/kg)
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B / Serious eye damage: Cat. 1
STOT – SE: Cat. 3
Surfactants:
(20 %w/w)
Not classified as a hazardous chemical/env. hazard
(can ignore for classification)
• Need to calculate ATE using formula in GHS text – see 3.1.3.6
• Cut-off for Skin Corr. 1B is ≥5% and ≥3% for Eye Dam. 1
43
Classification of mixtures
GHS Classification
Signal Word: DANGER
Skin corrosion: Cat. 1B
H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye
damage
H402 + H412 Harmful to aquatic life with
long lasting effects
Acute/Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 3
Pictogram(s):
If direct translation of R-phrases was
used:
Serious eye irritation: Cat. 2A
Acute/Chronic aquatic toxicity: Cat. 3
Signal Word: WARNING
H314 Causes serious eye irritation
H402 + H412 Harmful to aquatic life with
long lasting effects
Pictogram(s):
44
Classifying mixtures
• Gather as much information as you can – where test data is available, use it.
• Most mixtures should be able to be re-classified using direct translations of Rphrases to H-statement.
• However, where components are close to cut-off concentrations, re-classifying
sometimes may involve a few extra steps.
• If this is not possible, obtain the individual classifications (GHS or AC/ADG) of
each component and derive the overall classification from there.
• Contact the supplier/manufacturer/importer for extra information if necessary.
• The decision logic in each chapter of the GHS text can help greatly.
45
Contact
Questions?
Web:
www.swa.gov.au
Email:
[email protected]
Phone: 1300 551 832
46
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