Scottish Studies Award
Support Network Event
th
18 May 2015
Welcome
Robert Quinn
(Head of Service)
Liz McLashan
(Senior EV)
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Entries increasing – positive
Issue with candidates completing Award advice re entering Scottish Context Units
Encourage Centres re advantages of flexible
Award
Code/Level
2013/14
Entries
2013/14
Awards
G176/42
-2014/5*
Entries
2014/5*
Awards
238
GG5X/43
47
4
71
3
GG64/44
401
68
692
86
GG65/45
258
93
323
50
G171 /46
9
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Evidence from Centres needs to demonstrate
how candidates have broadened their
knowledge of Scotland
Product/Activity often proves to be less
important than process of research
Centres should document process – through
Assessor Checklist comments or candidates
logbook
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Centres generally had clear understanding of
national standard
Variety of activities being encouraged – often
dependent on candidate skills
Evidence of aims, sources and level of support
needs to be provided by Centres
Internal verification is important – both to
ensure standards are met – and to train staff
in standards expected
Use of language directly from the Assessment
Standards is helpful


Types of product can vary widely – use of
photographic evidence/video footage of
performance/logbooks/assessment grids with
teacher comment/evidence of reflection
through interview – support assessment
judgements
Where candidates work through a unit of work
– can demonstrate that knowledge is broadened
through process rather than just the activity –
candidate response can determine level of
understanding – and hence assessment
judgements
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Complete evidence required for verification
Indicate level of support given to individual
candidates
Centres advised to use Candidate and Assessor
checklists
Candidates are required to have learned about
their Scottish Focus
Sources and Resources!
Guard against lifting from sources – candidates
own wording is essential
Possible to gain higher level – evidence of
reflection/additional analysis

Centres which have chosen a March Completion
deadline are eligible for verification

Visiting Verification being considered

Centres pick up benefit from direct advice

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Contributing units are covered in other courses
– ensure that “with a Scottish Context” codes
are used
For ALL contributing units/different levels encourage Depts to teach/assess in a Scottish
context
Be creative – in PSE? – an extra in English or
History? – in Core RME? – as IDL? – in S6 study
time? – with SfL? – with SLT? – with S3 at end
of BGE?
Much of work can be done individually and
independently – not necessarily in school – tutor
support? part of Assertive mentoring?

Support Visits can be requested by Centres –
cost involved

Prior Verification service available

[email protected] – give a contact number
Maria Antelmi
Isobel Mair School
Scottish Studies
National 2
Learning about Scotland
1.1
•
•
•
•
Select an aspect of Scotland you want to learn about.
Mind maps
Research a few subjects
Presentations
Guidance
Learning about Scotland
Robert Burns
• Research – who was he, when did he live, what did he
do…………….?
you tube animation
• Quizzes
in class
online
• Visit to Ayr
Robert Burns
• Listened to and watched clips of poems and songs
you tube
• Chose 3-4 poems and looked at one or two verses more in
depth
• Paired up and learned alternate lines of a verse
• Presented to class and talked about meaning of the poem
• How do we celebrate his life and work?
Robert Burns
1.2
Select an activity that will help you develop this
knowledge.
Robert Burns
• Burns Supper
what happens
order of events
types of food
poems and songs
Burns Supper
1.3
Identify the main steps that you will follow to
complete the activity.
• Organise
identify the main steps
assign tasks/actions
• invites
• recipes
• shopping lists
• decorations
• music
• create a quiz
Burns Supper - presentation
Burns Supper - quiz
Burns Supper – Smart Response
Burns Supper – address to the haggis
Burns Supper - recitals
Language and Literature
• Understanding language with a Scottish context:
• Reading poems and listening to songs
A dug, a dug – Clicker 6
Ally Bally
The Proclaimers
The Family Ness
Super Gran

Language and Literature
• The Eejits (The Twits)
• Listening to the original on You Tube
• Listening and reading the Scottish
version
Language and Literature
•
•
•
•
•
Highlighting new words
Word of the day
Using Scots words in class
Wall displays
Homework
Language and Literature
Language and Literature – differentiating for
CfE
Language and Literature – differentiating for
CfE
• a dug, a dug
Language and Literature – differentiating for
CfE
Arts and Culture
• Contributing to a performance event with a Scottish
context:
interest in superheroes
enjoyed Super Gran
wanted to make their own film
Arts and Culture
• Wrote the script together
• Written around issues that were important to the pupils
bullying
• Informed through the language in The Eejits
Marjorie Kerr
and
Nicole Tonner
Grove Academy
SCOTTISH STUDIES
At Grove Academy,
Dundee
MY BACKGROUND
Marjorie Kerr
Principal Teacher of Geography, Grove
Academy
Social Studies Development Officer, Education
Scotland
Acting DHT, Grove Academy
SCHOOL
BACKGROUND
•
1,246 pupils
•
BGE for all pupils in S1 and S2; some choice
in S3
•
Pupils study for six N4/N5 subjects in S4; five
subjects in S5
•
Studying for mostly ‘new’ Highers in 2014-15
•
Large cohort of S6 pupils
INTRODUCING
SCOTTISH STUDIES
TO S3
•S3
- had already tried an IDL period per week but
parked after HMIe visit in 2012
•Period
still exists in timetable - shared between English
and Maths (30 period week)
•Moving
delivery
•IDL
to 33 period week in 2016 so more scope for
Working Group willing to give Scottish Studies a ‘go’
•English
Department introducing Scots Language so
keen to do Scottish Studies too.
•PT
English very much on board
THE REALITY
•SLT
in favour. Given the go ahead.
•IDL
Working group to take timetabled classes
•Sorted
out classes
•Ready
to start then hit by absence, work
overload
•One
class going to be trialled this term
•Introduce
in August 2015
INTRODUCING
SCOTTISH STUDIES
TO S6
•
AH Music students
•IDL
Working Group mentored
individual students
THE REALITY
•S6
really successful
•In
course choice booklet for next session
•NQT
presented to Guidance Team and S5
classes to inform them about it
•Timetabled
option within Skills column on
course choice matrix
•Speak
to whole staff about ‘with a
Scottish context’ Units
OTHER SLT ISSUES
•Budget
•Photocopying
•Resources
•Access
•Staff
- purchase and storage
to technology
willingness to participate
KEY TO SUCCESS
•Team
•SLT
•PT
work
member
English
•Enthusiastic
NQT - Nicole
Jacqueline Millar
Dalkeith
High School
Scottish Studies Award
S4 Core RME
The versatility of the awards:
(Using a core subject at different
levels with a whole year group)
Jacqueline Millar, Dalkeith High School
Investigating Religion & Belief with a Scottish Context
“The study of a topic involving religion or religious
belief which has contemporary or historical
relevance in Scotland.”
We chose Euthanasia
Other possible topics include:
The general aim of this Unit is to reflect on
a topic involving religion or religious belief
which has a contemporary or historical
relevance in Scotland
Learners who complete this Unit will be able to:
1. Develop knowledge and understanding of a
topic involving religion or religious belief
2. Reflect on their faith or values in response to
the topic
The versatility of the awards
We covered the following to make sure our
topic, euthanasia, had a Scottish context:
- Hospices in Scotland: Marie Curie Hospice in
Edinburgh, St Columba’s Hospice Edinburgh
- End of Life Assistance (Scotland) Bill, September 2010
- Margo MacDonald
- Christian view: Roman Catholic & Church of Scotland
- Looking at the laws in Switzerland and thinking about
what restrictions/rules to consider if Scotland did
legalise euthanasia
- Use of up to date statistics
Outcome 1: Develop knowledge &
understanding of a topic involving religion or
religious belief by:
At all levels they have
to:
National
5:
1.1
a topic
involving
religion or religious belief,
- Choosing
Outline the
chosen
topic
with minimum support
- Outline religious belief relevant to the topic
1.2 Explaining the topic, in detailed terms and referring to
relevant abstract ideas
Nat
3 is the and
above
in basica religious
terms belief or religious
1.3
Identifying
explaining
viewpoint
to the
chosen topic, in detailed
Nat 4 is relevant
the above
in straightforward
terms terms
and referring to relevant theoretical or abstract ideas.
Nat 5 is the above in detail with the addition of
1.4 Analysing
and explaining relevant source
other outcomes:
material
Encouraging Reflection
• The Unit Assessment Support materials are
very useful: they have outlines for what you
can do for each level.
• We used the tables within this to create a
reflection booklet for them to update
during the course and this meets all
requirements for outcome 2.
Pushing Nat 5 candidates
We have used a variety of
approaches to ensure that the
National 5 candidates are
challenged enough in order to
meet the requirements for all
areas in Outcome 1.
Assessments
For National 3:
We gave an option of either creating a
presentation on the topic or an assessment
that was question and answer based
(Pupils given the success criteria
2 weeks before so that they
knew what was expected of them)
Assessments
For National 4
We gave them an option of creating a
presentation or doing a mind map of all
the relevant areas linked to the topic.
(Pupils given the success criteria
2 weeks before so that they
knew what was expected of them)
Assessments
For National 5
We gave them an essay to write on
the topic.
(Pupils were given the success
criteria 2 weeks before so that
they knew what was expected of
them)
Assessments
• Our assessments had a focus on
Scotland too, the focus being:
“Scotland should legalise Euthanasia”.
How far do you agree with this
statement?
Doing part of the Scottish Studies
Award in Core RME:
Make sure it is a topic pupils will be
interested in.
Encourage reflection throughout
Push the National 5 candidates
Support the National 3 pupils, give them
other tasks when the demand of the
topic/task is too difficult.
Make it relevant to Scotland
Nicola Daniel
Broughton
High School and
EV
SSA - Meeting
the Standard for
Level 6
Nicola Daniel
External Verifier / CL English Broughton High
School, Edinburgh
All learners must complete the
mandatory Scottish Studies: Scotland in
Focus (SCQF level 6) Unit.
Scottish
Studies
Award at
Level 6
They will also complete three Units
from at least two of the following
Groups:




Group 1 Language and Literature
Group 2 Society and Environment
Group 3 Arts and Culture
Group 4 Business, Industry and
Employment
 There are a number of subject areas within
each of these groups. Learners can select only
one Unit from any individual subject area within
a group.
Whichever Units are chosen, these must be
delivered and assessed in a Scottish context
(and the unit codes are different for these)
http://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/files_ccc/ASScotStudSCQF6.pdf
Units can
come
from:
Languages
Society and
Environment
Arts and
Culture
Business,
Industry,
Employment
Scots
Language
Religion,
Belief and
Values
Media
Business
Management
Gaelic
Geography
Art and
Design
Care
Gaidhlig
Applied
Science
Dance
Engineering
Science
English
Environ.
Science
Drama
Economics
HFT
Music
Travel and
Tourism
Law
Modern
Studies
History
Candidate Brief:
Candidates will:
plan and complete an activity that will
help them to learn about an aspect of
Scotland than is of interest to them
The
Scotland
in Focus
Unit
 finding out about eg: a famous Scottish
person, place or invention; Scottish music,
art, literature or architecture; Scottish
communities at home or abroad; people,
circumstances or events that have influenced
Scottish culture
 analyse what they have found out
while they were completing the activity
communicate this effectively and in
detail.
evaluate the process they have
followed and the effectiveness of their
chosen method of communication.
Planning/
Completing
the Activity
Candidates must decide:
 which two aspects of Scotland they want to
learn about - these will be their aims throughout
the Unit
 what they will do to in order to learn about these
aspect of Scotland
 How they will communicate what they have
learned
 On at least 3 sources of information they will use
 the resources they will need, to complete the
activity.
Candidates will then:
 complete the activity, focusing on the specific
aspects of Scotland chosen.
 identify in detail what they have learned about
these aspects of Scotland
 communicate this effectively and in detail
 Evaluate the processes they followed and the
effectiveness of their method of communication.
Candidates could have:
 produced a report, booklet or on-line web-page
which contains all the information about what
they have learned
Identifying
and
Communica
ting Your
Findings
 delivered an electronic presentation with slides
and speaker’s notes to show clearly what they
have learned
 put on a performance and kept a workbook or
log of what they learned as they planned and
developed the performance
 created art or craft work and kept notes about
what they have learned as they planned and
created it
 can use the Candidate Evidence Checklist to
check that they have all the evidence needed
Teachers will confirm any part of the activity he
or she has observed, if necessary and that all the
evidence has been the candidate’s own work.
Outcome 1
Learners will: plan and complete an activity that
has a Scottish focus by
Outcomes
and
Assessment
Standards
1.1
identifying aims in relation to broadening,
and adding depth to, their knowledge of Scotland
1.2
identifying an activity that will help them to
achieve these aims
1.3
identifying detailed sources of information
and the resources required to complete the activity
1.4
researching and selecting detailed
information which is of relevance to their aims, using
the sources they have identified
1.5
using this information and the resources to
complete the activity in a way that helps them to
achieve their aims
1.6
working independently throughout
Not only broadening knowledge but
adding more depth:
• Widening their learning
• Learning about the new topic in detail
Progression
from Level
5
Detailed sources required
Selecting detailed information
New for level 6: candidates are
expected to work independently
throughout
Outcome 2
Learners will:
Outcomes
and
Assessment
Standards
Reflect on what they have learned about their
Scottish focus during the activity by
2.1 analysing in depth what they have learned
about their Scottish focus
2.2 communicating what they have learned
effectively and in detail
2.3 evaluating the process they have followed
and the effectiveness of their chosen method of
communication
The depth of content you would expect
from a candidate at Higher level
Progression
from Level
5
Depth of analysis you would expect
from a candidate who is sitting Higher.
New elements:
Evaluate the process they undertook for
researching and communicating.
Evaluate how effective their chosen
method of communication has been.
Depth of
Analysis:
a short
extract
During the process of writing a play about the Scottish
Witch hunts of 1590, I feel I have gained valuable insight
into an important period of Scottish history not often
discussed. It is a period of history we have perhaps
suppressed from memory due to the horrific acts of
violence involved - acts carried out due to ignorance,
fear, and religious prejudice.
From my research, I learned that the witch hunts came
about due to a number of religious and political tensions
at the time. After the reformation in 1560, the Church of
Scotland was keen to establish its authority and purity
as a Protestant institution and worked to inspire an
almost puritanical devotion to the Church amongst the
populace. This led to an atmosphere of suspicion and
mistrust within Scotland, as people were convinced dark
forces were working against them to undermine their
faith.
Amidst all this, King James VI, ruler of Scotland at the
time, had his own fixation concerning supernatural
forces. After his ship was almost destroyed on a voyage
back from Denmark, he began to suspect witchcraft had
been used against him. This paranoia eventually led him
to sanction a massive witch hunt across East Lothian,
encompassing many towns and villages such as Tranent
and Prestonpans…
Evaluation can be done orally (as part of
a learning conversation) or in writing
Candidates could evaluate:
Evaluation
• How effectively their sources helped them
how they have deepened and broadened
their knowledge of Scotland
• the importance of this new knowledge – its
impact on Scotland, its relevance past,
present or future, the impact it has had on
the candidate
• how effective their method of research had
been
• complete their aims
• their chosen method of communication/ the
activity chosen
• how well they completed their activity
• the process/standard of their
communication
• how independently they worked
Progression
acrossLevel
levels
Level 4
5
Level 3
Level 6
Aim
One –
Agreed with
teacher
One –
Chosen from
selection
Two –
Identified
independently
Two –
Identified
independently
Sources
Two –
Agreed with
teacher
Two –
Chosen from
selection
Three Identified
independently
Three –
Identified
independently
Support
Structured
support
Supported with
advice
Minimal support
Independent
throughout
Communicating
Findings
Identify what
you have
learned
Identify in some
detail what you
have learned
Analyse what you
have learned
Analyse in depth
Evaluation
Communication
Level
Basic level of
Clear
communication communication
Evaluate the process
and effectiveness of
your communication
Effective
communication
Effective
communication
Detailed
Scottish Studies Award
Webpage link:
http://www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/64329.html
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