Jobs & Careers:
Preparing for work
Information Pack
January 2009
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Information Packs Year Planner 2009
JANUARY
Achieve Economic Well-Being: Job Skills
FEBRUARY
Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer History Month: LGBTQ Issues
MARCH
Be Healthy: No Smoking Day
APRIL
Earth Day: Environmental Issues
MAY
Local & Community History Month: Citizenship
JUNE
Gypsy/Romany/Traveller History Month: Working with GRT Young People
JULY
World Population Day: Parenting
AUGUST
Making a Positive Contribution: Volunteering
SPETEMBER Enjoy & Achieve: International Literacy Day
OCTOBER
Black History Month & Kick Racism Out of Football: Diversity
NOVEMBER
Stay Safe: Anti Bullying Week
DECEMBER
Festivals: Global Youth Work
Useful Websites
To visit these websites, please view this pack as a SLIDESHOW (press F5)
SELF ASSESSMENT/CAREERS ADVICE
http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/11_16/gogetit/careerstoolbox/library.shtml Useful activity sheets in pdf/rtf
http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/?CMP=KAC-jankw08 Government’s career advice webpages
http://www.connexions-direct.com/index.cfm?go=Careers Connexions Direct resources
JOBSEARCHES
https://quimby.careervision.co.uk/cgi-bin/KMVac.exe/init?access=web Connexions Kent & Medway Jobsearch
http://www.connexionskentandmedway.co.uk/pages/young_people/job_hunting.aspx tips on job hunting
http://www.jobcentreplus.gov.uk/JCP/index.html Jobcentre Plus
CV TIPS & TEMPLATES
http://content.monster.co.uk/section4047.asp?WT.srch=1&WT.mc_n=Seeker_CV_&_Extras CV resources from Monster
http://www.interimmanagementuk.com/PDF/CV-Writing.pdf Straightforward tips for writing a CV
http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/helpwithyourcareer/writecv/ Tips, links and online CV builder
http://www.bbc.co.uk/wales/justthejob/jobs/cvs.shtml How To guide + templates
INTERVIEW SKILLS & TECHNIQUE
http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/helpwithyourcareer/intshort/ Interview dos and don'ts
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/YoungPeople/Workandcareers/Gettingyourfirstjob/DG_066164 general job hunting tips + what to wear for
an interview
http://www.connexions-direct.com/index.cfm?catalogueContentID=119&pid=75 Connexions article ‘How to sell yourself at an interview’
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Introduction
These packs are intended as a curriculum resource and to enhance the delivery of the 5 ‘Every Child Matters’ outcomes.
This month’s pack looks at delivering the ‘achieve economic well being’ outcome through a series of sessions focusing on
developing skills relevant to finding employment.
Some young people may need extra support with some of the literacy based tasks involved and it is suggested that session leaders
have a clear idea of the vocabulary used and a dictionary available.
HOW TO USE THIS PACK
•
Although the sessions can stand alone, if young people attend a minimum of 3 sessions they will have achieved a recorded
outcome.
•
This pack can form the basis of a Youth Achievement Award challenge. More information on this will arrive in a
supplementary pack. However, it would be good practice to:
– Evidence young people’s participation through photographs and session notes
– Make sure leaders and young people sign all worksheets and other session products
– Keep a note of time young people have spent engaged in activities and planning
CURRICULUM CHAPTERS: Career/Work Related Learning and Decision Making, Citizenship
EVERY CHILD MATTERS OUTCOMES: Enjoy & Achieve, Achieve Economic Well-Being
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 1 – My Personal Profile
Materials: worksheets (attached), pens, flipchart, post-its or small pieces of paper
Activity 1: Who Am I? Ask each member of the group to use 3 sentences to describe themselves:
•
Your greatest strength
•
Thing you like/enjoy the most
•
Job or career you would like to do
Hand out the first worksheet (Who Am I?) – ask young people to work individually. When they have completed their graph, read
out the information on jobs/careers that corresponds to each category. Were young people surprised by what their choices
indicated as a good career? Was it something they had considered or never thought about? Would they be interested in any
of those careers?
Activity 2: Career Code: Now that the group is thinking about careers they might pursue, it’s time to get a career code and start
building up the personal profile. Hand out the activity sheet. Explain that, having looked at strengths and weaknesses, you’re
now going to look at interests. When everyone has finished, hand out the second sheet (or read out the information)
outlining possible career choices and get the group to assess each other’s best career choice. Ask the group if they think the
choices that correspond to their code are good ones? Do they feel they fit in these groups or not? Explain that looking at
strengths and weaknesses and personal interests can help to think about career opportunities you might not have thought
of, or make choices clearer. Ask if the group have access to careers advice at school or through Connexions – now you can
devise an action plan so that they can help you to plan for your chosen career.
Activity 3: Action Plan: ask young people to get into groups with others who share the first Letter of their career code (you may
need to use the second letter to break up larger groups). Hand out the action plan worksheets, one per person, but ask
them to discuss the plan as a group. Ask one person to feedback from each group on the plan they have devised. How do
the plans differ for different groups? Do other groups have suggestions to make to improve the plans? Are the plans
achievable?
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 1 – My Personal Profile
Evaluation: Write the following on the flipchart:
•
Were you surprised by the career choices that came up?
•
Do you feel that you have a clearer idea about what might be a good career for you?
•
Do you feel you could take the next steps to follow your career?
Then ask the group to write their 3 responses on post-its/small pieces of paper which they then attach to the flip chart. Words or
images can be used for a response. Let the group have a look at each other’s responses and encourage a discussion to
emerge.
Extension Activity: Encourage each young person to complete the PRET (see separate attachment) to give themselves a clearer
idea of their goals.
Now and ‘Now’: Ask each member of the group to imagine where they want to be at 16, 18 or 21. Ask them to come up with a
‘now’ statement of where they want to be and what they want to be doing e.g. ‘I’m 16 and I’m studying to be a doctor and
learning to drive’. Encourage them to express this statement however they like – as a mind map, action plan, collage etc.
Then use as the basis for a display.
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes – Session 1
The Connexions Kent and Medway site has a range of information for young people about education, employment and training:
http://www.connexionskentandmedway.co.uk/pages/home/index.aspx
The Planning, Recording & Evaluation Toolkit is based on similar resources available online, particularly this:
http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/youthsupport/general/ysds_toolkit_3b.pdf The attached toolkit was developed for use at [email protected]
but can be adapted to your own users.
Who Am I? Suggested careers:
Linguistic: writer,
editor, secretary,
teacher, politician
Logical: Scientist,
engineer, computer
programmer,
accountant,
philosopher
Spatial: Architect,
artist, mechanic,
engineer, dentist
Naturalistic:
geologist, museum
worker,
oceanographer,
marine biologist
Musical: Musician,
DJ, music critic,
composer
Kinaesthetic:
craftsman, athlete,
artist, surgeon,
mechanic
Interpersonal:
business person,
community or youth
worker, counsellor
Intrapersonal:
writer, self
employed,
entrepreneur
Expected outcomes: Encouraging young people to think about possible careers, to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, to
action plan and to think about how that plan can be enacted.
Curriculum Chapters: Career/Work Related Learning and Decision Making, Citizenship
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Who Am I?
Tick or circle the statements that apply to you and then total them – write the total for each group in the space provided
LINGUISTIC (Word
skills)
Total:
•Like to read, write and tell
stories
•Like word puzzles and quizzes
•Have a good memory for
names, places & dates
•Can remember jokes
•Can spell easily
MUSICAL
LOGICAL/MATHS
(Number skills)
Total:
•Like working with computers
•Ask a lot of questions
•Enjoy strategy games like chess
•Like doing experiments
•Can reason things out in a clear
and logical way
KINESTHETIC
(Movement skills)
Total:
•Need to move around a lot
•Good at sports
•Like dancing, swimming, hiking
•Use a lot of gestures & body
language
•Like doing craft and DIY
SPATIAL
(Building skills)
Total:
•Like pictures, movies, maps,
charts
•Like to draw and create things
•Good at finding things
•Like building with Lego or doing
puzzles
•Daydreamer
INTERPERSONAL
(people skills)
Total:
•Like to think out loud
•Like to join groups
•Tend to be leaders
•Good at solving arguments
•Like organising people
NATURALISTIC
(Environment
skills)
Total:
•Like to collect and categorise
information
•Keep diaries or observations
•Like to find out about plants &
animals
•Like to go on outdoor trips
•Care about the environment
INTRAPERSONAL
(personal skills)
Total:
•Independent & confident
•Prefer to work alone
•Strong opinions on
controversial topics
•Intuitive with inner wisdom
•Dress, act & think differently
Total:
© Suzannah Youde 2009
•Music is very important
•Play a musical instrument
•Use music as a mood changer
•Need music to study or do jobs
•Hear sounds that others might
not
Who Am I?
Now plot your scores on this grid and you’ll have a clear picture of your strengths - the things you’re really good at – and your
weaknesses – things you’re not so great at. Shade one box for each number in your total.
5
4
3
2
1
Linguistic
Logical
Spatial
Naturalistic
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Musical
Kinesthetic
Interpersona
l
Intrapersona
l
Career Codes
We’ve looked at your strengths and weaknesses – now it’s time to look at the things that interest you. Circle or tick the
statements that most appeal to you and then total them up. When you’ve done that, write the letters from the three
sections that total the most – write them in from highest to lowest. Congratulations, you found your career code!
Messing around with cars
Building things
Carpentry
Driving or learning to drive
Working outdoors
Fixing electrical things
DIY
Finding out about wildlife
MY ‘R’ TOTAL = _______
Doing Sudoku & logic problems
Astronomy
Building model rockets
Studying science
Doing jigsaw puzzles
Using a chemistry set
Being let loose in the lab
Doing experiments
MY ‘I’ TOTAL = _______
Acting
Fashion design
Creative writing
Drawing & painting
Going to gigs
Learning languages
Playing music
Reading about art and music
MY ‘A’ TOTAL = _______
Going to sports events
Belonging to a club
Volunteering
Helping people
Making new friends
Finding out about different
cultures
Playing with children
Helping old people
MY ‘S’ TOTAL = _______
Being top of the class
Being the leader
Giving speeches
Selling things to people
Finding out about business
Mixing with people at parties
Setting up your own business
Designing posters
MY ‘E’ TOAL = _______
Sticking to a budget
Keeping things tidy
Writing everything down
Using a computer
Having a job
Using a cash register
Doing a spread sheet
Word processing
MY ‘C’ TOTAL = _______
My CAREER CODE is: _______ _______ _______
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Career Codes
A = Artistic
Artistic people like to work
in unstructured ways that
make the most of their
abilities. Good career
choices are:
I = Investigate
If you like to analyze,
problem solve, observe and
investigate then you might
enjoy the following careers:
C = Conventional
Your greatest skills are
organising and having a
great eye for detail. Good
careers would be:
Biologist
Chemist
Doctor
Engineer
Weatherman
Pharmacist
Vet
Accountant
Air traffic controller
Bank Manager
Receptionist
Secretary
Personal Assistant
Administrator
R = Realistic
If you’re a realistic person,
chances are you love sport
and the outdoors. You might
like a career as:
E = Enterprising
You love to work with
people, but you like to be
top dog! Good careers
include:
S = Social
You also like to work with
people but you prefer to
help, cure or inform.
Careers for you might be:
Builder
Carpenter
Taxi/Lorry Driver
Electrician
Farmer
Mechanic
Surveyor
Buyer
Flight attendant
Insurance agent
Lawyer
Manager
Salesperson
Travel agent
Sports trainer
Counsellor
Physical therapist
Dentist
Psychologist
Speech therapist
Teacher
Actor/actress
Architect
Composer
Dancer
Interior decorator
Musician
Writer
© Suzannah Youde 2009
My Action Plan
Now that you’ve chosen your career, you’ll need to think about how you’re going to get to your goal. Fill in the action plan to
help you get things clear in your mind!
My career
_________
_________
_________
My decisions:
1. _________
_________
_________
_________
2. _________
_________
_________
_________
3. _________
_________
_________
_________
Three things I need to study/find out:
1. ______________________________
2. ______________________________
3. ______________________________
Anything
else?
___________
___________
___________
What 3 main
questions do I
need to ask?
1. _________
_________
_________
2. _________
_________
_________
3. _________
_________
_________
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Do I still have any doubts or
problems?
____________________________
____________________________
____________________________
Where can I go to get the
information I need?
1. __________________________
2. __________________________
3. __________________________
Session 2 – Looking for my Dream Job
Materials: local newspapers with job adverts, worksheets (below)
Activity 1: My key skills: begin with a group discussion about what skills the group thinks they need for the careers they have
decided on? Ask them to think about whether they already have those skills. Divide the group into 3 smaller groups and
hand out the activity sheets. Give them various situations to organise (see leader’s notes) and ask them write down the
things they would need to do to accomplish the task and the personal qualities they would need. Once all the groups have
done this, ask them to look at the next heading and to think about what skills they would need. Once the groups have done
this then ask them to look at the next heading and to work out how they could use those skills in the workplace. Once all the
groups have finished start a discussion about what they’ve learned – were they surprised to find out that they had so many
skills that are needed in a job? And that they may have skills that they need for their chosen career?
Activity 2: Finding a job: ask the group to work in pairs and get them to look through the paper for jobs that they think they could
do, that might be interesting or that would provide them with good experience for their chosen career. Ask them to look in
particular for:
•
The skills required
•
The personal qualities required
•
How they need to respond to the advert (application form, phone call, letter)
Encourage each pair to make a list of the skills they think they could offer and then ask them to role play a phone
conversation with one of them playing the employer and the other themselves applying for the job. Listen in on each pair
and ask them what the job is, what skills they think they need, what relevant experience they could offer.
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 2 – Looking for my Dream Job
Activity 3: Job hunt: hand out the sheet and split the group into 4 smaller groups. Provide a pile of newspapers and ask each
group to find adverts featuring the key phrases or jobs on their sheets, then cut them out and paste them in the boxes.
Evaluation: Group discussion of the following questions:
•
Do you understand the difference between personal qualities & key skills?
•
Does everyone understand the vocabulary that’s used in job adverts?
•
Do you have a good idea of your personal qualities and skills?
•
Would you feel confident applying for a job?
•
If not, what would you need to do to improve your skills?
Extension activity: As a group, work on an application letter for one of the jobs found during activity 3, using real life experiences
to offer relevant personal qualities and key skills.
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes – Session 2
Vocabulary used in job adverts can be daunting, so make sure you have a good understanding yourself and have a dictionary to hand.
Another good resource is http://www.jobs.ac.uk/careers/articles/1012/How_to_read_a_job_advertisement which has some
useful tips on what various phrases mean, as does this article from the Guardian
http://jobs.guardian.co.uk/careers/200259/503193/reading-job-ads
Remember, personal qualities can’t be measured so young people will need to show experience that reflects their qualities and then
highlight the key skills involved. Always try and use the same vocabulary as the advert itself – if it asks for someone ‘enthusiastic
and motivated’ then young people need to say they are ‘enthusiastic and motivated’ – then give examples.
Activity 1: Themes could include:
•
Organising a party
•
Organising a football match
•
Organising a charity event
•
Organising events at a youth centre
There are more examples of qualities/skills/workplace skills here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/11_16/gogetit/careerstoolbox/pdf/yourskills.pdf
Expected outcomes: developing a sense of qualities and skills, recognising job advert vocabulary, developing self confidence
Curriculum Chapters: Career/Work Related Learning and Decision Making
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Personal Qualities & Key Skills
Complete the table using your own examples of qualities and skills
I CAN (personal qualities)
KEY SKILLS
WORKPLACE SKILLS
e.g. phone my friends to
invite them to a party
communication
Phone clients to arrange a
meeting
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Job Ad Hunt
Find examples of job ads that match the following phrases then glue them into the boxes below:
An ad asking for
experience
An ad for a part
time job
An ad asking for
IT skills
An ad offering
job share
An ad for a job
with a salary
An ad for a job
that requires a
driving licence
An ad asking for
references
An ad asking for
commitment
An ad with an
equal
opportunities
employer
An ad for a job
in a shop
An ad for a job
offering the
minimum wage
An ad for a job
with benefits
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 3 – Writing my CV
Materials: computer access and/or CV worksheet, copy of CV PowerPoint (attached separately), flip chart, wordsearch, CV
template
Activity 1: go round the group and ask each young person to:
•
Say their name and age
•
Name their best personal quality
•
Name their best key skill
•
Say how they would use these in the workplace
Tell them they have just started to write their CV – the three statements form their personal profile. If you have computer access
you could show the CV PowerPoint slideshow. Otherwise check question the group (using the CV slideshow notes as a basis)
as to what they think a CV is – helping you get a job; that lists your personal qualities, skills and experience; that is clear and
easy to read. Brainstorm some of the vocabulary you will need – if necessary prompt the group to include words like
‘commitment’, ‘enthusiasm’, ‘motivation’, ‘initiative’.
Activity 2: CV vocabulary wordsearch: work in pairs to first match the words to their definition then find them in the grid. Discuss
the answers afterwards to check understanding.
Activity 3: Support young people to at least start their CV, concentrating on the personal statement. The following CV builder is an
excellent resource, with a range of advice activities:
https://www.cvbuilder-advice-resources.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2
Otherwise, use the CV worksheet to start developing a CV
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 3 – Writing my CV
Evaluation: draw a grid on the flip chart:
Can you write
a personal
profile
statement?
Are you
happy with
your CV?
Do you think
your CV is
clear and
easy to read?
Do you think
your CV
would get you
an interview?



Then have a show of hands on each question, marking the responses with a tick in the grid.
Extension activity: Finish the CV and write an all purpose covering letter stating the kind of job being sought, the qualities and key
skills on offer and how they could be used in the workplace. Use the template (attached as a separate file)or build online.
Draw on work from session 2 if available.
CV Relay: divide the group into 2 teams. For each team lay 3 pieces of paper at a suitable distance (or provide 3 bibs, 3 hoops etc)
marked ‘qualities’ ‘skills’ ‘qualifications’. Give each team a pile of CV related words e.g. Committed, confident, numeracy,
communication, GCSE, NVQ and ask each team member in turn to take a word, place in the correct pile and return to the
next team member. Remember this is a race, so encourage speed! Repeat until all words have been sorted – the team with
the most correct wins.
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes - Session 3
There are any number of online CV builders but these are worth a look:
http://www.mycvbuilder.com/cvb/index.cfm?fuseaction=register.buildcvfree&membershiplevel=100 (free 90 day trial)
http://www.jobcare.co.uk/index.cfm/item_id:37/free-cv-creator/ Straightforward
http://www.careeradvicecenter.com/category/cv-and-resume.html
http://cafe-itcvbuilder.blogspot.com/ advice, CV builders, slideshow and more
http://www.greatcvs.co.uk/ useful advice and tips on writing a great CV
http://www.connexions-direct.com/index.cfm?pid=75&catalogueContentID=117&render=detailedArticle help getting a job
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/default.aspx?ofcresset=1 Microsoft offer a range of free CV templates
Golden rules:
•
Make sure your CV is typed
•
Keep it clear – use a font like Arial, Tahoma or Verdana in 12pt in black on a white or light background
•
Logical – start with your personal details and statement then start with school qualifications and experience
•
Accurate – use a spellchecker, read it through and ask a parent, teacher or youth worker to double check it
•
Concise – 2 pages MAXIMUM
•
Honest – you’ll have to answer questions on this information in an interview so don’t lie!
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes – Session 3
Activity 3: The ‘correct’ pairings would be:
Helen: Organised/organisation
Mia: Enthusiastic/people skills
Jake: Problem solving/computing
Tyrone: Initiative/communication
However, these aren’t set in stone and young people may see them differently – encourage them to state why they have made the
decisions they have made – for example, they might feel that doing beauty treatments for friends shows evidence of acting
on your own initiative and that volunteering shows enthusiasm. Use this as a basis for discussion of CV language.
Expected outcomes: young people will be able to identify the qualities and key skills to include in a personal statement, order
information logically, build a CV using IT skills, identify and use appropriate language
Curriculum Chapters: Career/Work Related Learning and Decision Making
© Suzannah Youde 2009
CV wordsearch
Match the words to the definitions, then find them in the grid!
Initiative
Exam or other training
n
t
u
e
t
f
e
e
c
h
c
a
Committed
Able to work on your own
o
i
r
e
i
i
e
e
n
n
c
i
Confident
Good at what you do
i
e
i
i
i
e
d
m
s
t
f
t
t
t
e
c
n
e
r
e
f
e
r
f
a
c
c
o
m
p
l
i
s
h
e
d
c
e
o
m
n
c
e
i
a
s
e
e
Motivated
Dedicated, loyal
Competent
Achieved, got done
Accomplished
What someone writes to
say you can do the job
i
c
n
p
m
t
d
d
c
t
c
t
f
v
f
e
m
v
a
e
t
a
t
a
Qualification
Excited, passionate
i
n
i
t
i
a
t
i
v
e
e
v
Reference
Secure about yourself
l
i
d
e
e
o
m
v
n
i
t
i
a
e
e
n
n
m
p
c
n
u
o
t
u
t
n
t
o
c
i
e
n
h
i
o
q
e
t
c
e
t
i
e
i
c
e
m
© Suzannah Youde 2009
All about me
can you match these people to their personal qualities & key skills?
Meet Jake. He enjoys
This is Helen. She loves
studying IT and playing
playing golf and organising
computer games
tournaments with her friends.
Mia loves everything about
beauty & fashion and is
always giving her friends
beauty treatments
Tyrone volunteers with his local
children’s charity and particularly
enjoys teaching about wildlife
Personal quality
Enthusiastic
Initiative
Problem solving
Organised
Key skill
Organisation
Computing
Communication
People skills
Now can you write a personal statement for each person?
Helen
Jake
Mia
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Tyrone
Session 4 – the Interview
Materials: pieces of card for the interview game, chairs for role play, CVs from session 3
Icebreaker: Eye contact: sit the group in a circle. Go round the circle and let everyone introduce themselves. Now explain that
everyone is to look around the circle and, when they make eye contact with someone across the circle they must change
places with that person. Ask them to do this slowly and calmly keeping eye contact at all times. Multiple exchanges can take
place at any time, but you can’t exchange with the same person twice in a row. After a few exchanges have taken place, tell
the group that now you would like them to shake hands when they meet each other and introduce themselves, keeping eye
contact all the time. In the group discussion, ask how that made people feel? Did they feel uncomfortable about keeping eye
contact? Did anybody break eye contact – if so, why? Was it difficult making and keeping eye contact? Explain that making
eye contact is the most crucial skill in a job interview and that employers will expect you to make and keep eye contact
because this means that you are confident, open and honest. Remind young people to blink – there’s a big difference
between eye contact and staring!
Activity 1: The interview game: Number off the group into 1s and 2s and have all 1s and all 2s work together. Give each group a
set of cards (see leader’s notes) and tell them these are all things they need to do to prepare for an interview for their
dream job. Some of these things they’ll need to do at least a week before, some the day before and some on the day itself.
Ask them to sort the cards into these categories, and then to decide in which order they would do things on the day of the
interview. When the groups are satisfied, ask them to swap and look at each other’s decisions. Discuss the decisions that
have been made – when would you find out about the company offering you the job and the job itself? When would you get
your clothes ready? Make the point that it pays to be really well prepared at an interview and to know about the company
and have questions ready to ask about the job.
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Session 4 – The Interview
Activity 2: Interview skills quiz: hand out the activity sheets and ask the young people to work in pairs. Tell them they need to
decide which of the statements listed are ‘bloopers’ or ‘super’ – mark bloopers with an X and super with a . Then add their
scores – if they score 7 or more ‘supers’ they get the job, otherwise they need to brush up on their interview skills. Use the
sheets to start a discussion on interview techniques – why is eye contact important? Why is it a good idea not to lie? Talk
through the bloopers using the leader’s notes, contrasting them to good interview behaviour.
Activity 3: The mock interview: mix up the pairs and ask one young person to be the interviewer and the other the candidate.
Give the ‘candidate’s’ CV to the ‘interviewer’ so they have a basis for questioning – otherwise, ask the candidate to decide
what job they want to be interviewed for. Give young people a few minutes to prepare – ask all the ‘candidates’ to work
together discussing good interviewing technique and all the ‘interviewers’ to work together to decide on their questions.
Remind the candidates of things like eye contact, self confidence, good handshake that are needed to make a good
impression. Tell the interviewers that there are 4 phases to an interview – the introduction, questions (about background
and suitability), candidate’s questions, final questions (what can you bring to the job?). Then put the pairs back together and
let them role play. If any young people are reluctant to participate, tell them they are going to sit on the interview panel –
they don’t have to say anything but they decide whether the candidate gets the job. Or simply have the most interested act
out their role play for the rest of the group and then ask for input – should the candidate get the job? Did they use good
interview technique? Did they make any bloopers? How did the candidate come across – did they sell themselves well?
Evaluation: Group discussion: would young people feel more confident about going for an interview? Do they feel they’ve learnt
useful interview skills? What are the most important things they would need to do to prepare for an interview and in the
interview itself?
Extension activity: drawing on all the learning from the previous sessions, encourage young people to find a job they would be
confident applying for and prepare for an interview for that job – and then apply for it!
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes – Session 4
There is plenty of information online about interview skills and techniques:
The University of Kent have an online quiz http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/ivquiz.htm that would make a good extension activity
Careers Advice offers excellent tips on technique: http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/helpwithyourcareer/intshort/
Monster has a series of videos based around job interviews http://content.monster.co.uk/14354_en-GB_p1.asp
Making a good impression checklist http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/media/making_a_good_impression.pdf
The interview game: There are no right or wrong answers but there are things it’s best to avoid e.g. you wouldn’t research the
company on the day of the interview. This is a really good activity for focusing on interview preparation as a key skill. The
following are suggestions but feel free to add ideas of your own:
The week before
The day before
On the day
Find out about the company
Iron clothes
Have a shower
Find out about the job
Wash hair
Clean teeth
Prepare some question to ask
Check train/bus times
Eat breakfast
Practice making eye contact
Check all papers
Check wallet/purse
Decide what to wear
Role play interview
Go to the bus stop/station
Get dry cleaning done
Practice your questions
Check contents of your bag
Read the interview letter
Read the job requirements
Relax
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Leader’s Notes – Session 4
Interview skills quiz:
Super = make eye contact, shake hands firmly (picture), dress smartly, do your research, smile (picture), switch off your mobile
(picture)
Bloopers = be late (picture), criticise your old employer, be arrogant, smoke (picture), look bored (picture), swear
Expected outcomes: building young people’s self esteem and self confidence, exploring and using good interview skills and
technique, developing self awareness and presentation skills, preparing young people to apply for work
Curriculum chapters: Career/Work Related Learning and Decision Making
© Suzannah Youde 2009
How’s Your Interview Technique?
Are you super? Or do you commit too many bloopers? Look at the following phrases and pictures and mark them with a X for a
blooper and a  if they’re super. Then see whether you get the job or need to try harder next time!
Make eye contact
do your research
criticise your previous employer
swear
Dress smartly
be arrogant
© Suzannah Youde 2009
Guidance Notes
HOW TO USE THIS PACK:
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Individual slides can be printed by selecting individual slide numbers or ranges in the PRINT menu
To print slides in black & white or grayscale, select the relevant option from the Colour/Grayscale drop down menu when
you are about to print
These slides may be used to form part of a presentation – press F5 to view as a slideshow
To delete individual slides, click on them to select then click on ‘cut’ in the Edit menu
This pack is also available in pdf format – please let me know if you would prefer to receive the pdf.
To make links ‘live’ you will need to view the pack as a SLIDESHOW – go to the ‘View’ menu or press F5
If you have any comments regarding this pack, or need any additional help in using it, please contact me:
SUZANNAH YOUDE: [email protected] or tel: 01622 221678
© Suzannah Youde 2009
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