Some Guiding Thoughts
on Science Education
Christie Brown, MELS
[email protected]
IEEE Region 7 Meeting
Montreal, Quebec
May 16, 2009
Objectives
• To provide an overview the science and
technology curriculum in Quebec.
• To share some of the challenges that
schools currently face and how IEEE can
help.
• To provide some suggestions on best
practices and opportunities for working
with teachers.
Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
• A vision for scientific literacy in Canada: Scientific
literacy is an evolving combination of the sciencerelated attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need
to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decisionmaking abilities, to become lifelong learners, and to
maintain a sense of wonder about the world around
them.
•
Source: CMEC. Common framework of science learning outcomes:
Pan-Canadian protocol for collaboration on school curriculum, 1997. p.
4
Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
• Diverse learning experiences based on the
framework will provide students with many
opportunities to explore, analyse, evaluate,
synthesize, appreciate, and understand
interrelationships among science, technology,
society, and the environment that will affect
their personal lives, their careers and their
future.
•
Source: CMEC. Common framework of science learning outcomes:
Pan-Canadian protocol for collaboration on school curriculum, 1997. p.
4
Council of Ministers of Education, Canada
• Students learn most effectively when their
study of science is rooted in concrete learning
experiences, related to a particular context or
situation, and applied to the world where
appropriate.
• Learning is enhanced when students identify
and solve problems.
•
Source: CMEC. Common framework of science learning outcomes:
Pan-Canadian protocol for collaboration on school curriculum, 1997. p.
7
From Engagement to Empowerment:
Reflections on Science Education for Ontario
• Science through “doing” provides students with
opportunities to develop, reinforce and extend their
understandings of conceptual knowledge and
procedural knowledge.
• Students need access to materials, tools, and
equipment necessary to develop and practice skills of
science.
• Students need opportunities to engage in a variety of
activities that foster the (development) of a broad
range of skills.
•
Source: Little, C. & Erminia Pedretti. From engagement to empowerment:
Reflections on Science Education for Ontario. Pearson, 2008. p. 34
Context of Quebec Schools
•
•
•
•
69 Francophone school boards
9 Anglophone school boards
1 Aboriginal school board
Private schools:
• French (FEEP)
• English (QAIS/AJDS)
• Non-affiliated
• CEGEP (equivalent to Grade 12 and First
Year University)
7
Context in Quebec Schools
• New curriculum, based on competencies,
currently undergoing implementation.
• Teachers who were familiar with teaching
specific content are now asked to reach
outside of their comfort zone. (solution:
Training Teams across the province)
• Appropriate resources are not always easy
to find (solution: Renovations of labs and
workshops; partnerships created with
organizations such as IEEE).
8
How is a competency
defined in Quebec?
• A competency is defined as the ability to
act effectively by mobilizing (using) a
range of resources.
•
MELS, p. 17, 2006
9
MELS, QEP, 2007. p.25
10
11
12
Key Features
Competency
Manifestations
“Observable Stuff”
Source: MELS, QEP, 2007
How competent we want
kids to be
when they leave school
Developing
competency
Year 2 – General Path
Earth &
Space
Solar energy flow
Earth-Moon system
(Gravitational effect)
Density, biological cycles
Study of
Populations
Material
World
Climate Change; Deforestation
Drinking Water; Energy Challenge
Transformation of
Energy
Law of conservation of energy
Energy efficiency
Distinction between heat and energy
Electrical
Engineering
Living
Technological
World
World
(Ecology)
16
Year 2 – Applied Path
Earth &
Material
Space
World
Living
World Technologies: Medical,
Multiview orthogonal projection
Graphical
(general drawing)
Language:
Functional dimensioning
Developments (prism, cylinder, pyramid, cone)
Standards and representations
(diagrams and symbols)
Information, Agricultural,
Automotive
Law of conservation of energy
Energy efficiency
Transformation of
Distinction between heat and energy
Energy
Electrical
Engineering
Technological
World
Mechanical
Engineering
Adhesion and friction of parts
Linking of mechanical parts (freedom of movement)
Guiding controls
Construction and characteristics of motion,
Transmission systems (friction gears, pulleys and belt,
Gear assembly, sprocket wheels and chain,
wheel and worm gear)
Speed changes, resisting torque, engine torque
Construction and characteristics of motion:
Transformation systems (screw gear system, connecting rods
Cranks, slides, rotating slider crank mechanism,
Rack and pinion drive, cams, eccentrics)
17
Approved Version
Food
Production
Residual
Materials
18
Approved
Version
Food
Production
Residual
Materials
19
General Education Path and
Applied Education Path
Cycle One
Secondary III
Secondary IV
SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (S&T)
Same
for all
students
555-306
555-404
6 credits
4 credits
Minimum (100 hrs)
(150 hours)
to Graduate
557-306
6 credits
(150 hours)
557-406
6 credits
(150 hrs)
APPLIED SCIENCE AND
TECHNOLOGY (AST)
Secondary V
OPTION
558-404
4 credits
OPTION 2
OPTION
Required
to1 enter
(100 hrs)
Chemistry
Pre-U Physics
SCIENCES
OPTION
4 credits 4 credits
in
CEGEP
558-402 (100 hrs) (100 hrs)
2 cr
Documents available in Spring 2009
(50 hrs)
OPT
BRIDGE
20
Competency 1
Seeks answers or solutions to
scientific or technological problems
This competency is identical in both
paths.
This competency is developed through
activities which require students to use
either the scientific method or the
design process.
21
22
Competency 2
Makes the most of his/her knowledge of
science and technology
General Path: Grade 10
Applied Path: Grade 10
-Focuses on ISSUES analysis
-Focuses on the analysis of
technical applications.
Issues:
- Climate Change
- Deforestation
- Energy Challenge
- Drinking Water
- Waste Management (Opt.)
- Food Production (Opt.)
MELS. General QEP, 2007. p. 46-53
Examples of Technologies:
- Medical
- Transportation
- Agricultural
- Information and Communication
MELS. Applied QEP, 2007. p. 24
Note: The forms of analysis are the same
10 ways seen in Cycle 1.
23
Technology Oriented
GENERAL PATH
24
Technology Oriented
APPLIED PATH
25
Competency 3
Communicates in the languages used
in science and technology
This competency is identical in both paths.
In order to know whether the student has
understood something - be it a concept, a
skill, or a method – they must communicate
this to us in an observable way…
26
27
Questions to be answered:
1) What is your intention with a given
activity?
•
•
Targeted Competencies
Targeted Content
2) What do your students already know?
3) How will you evaluate them?
•
•
During the activities?
At the end?
28
Challenges and Opportunities
• Some challenges:
•
•
•
Degree of comfort level for teachers with the technology
component.
The availability of good resources is not always obvious.
“Time”
• The Opportunities:
•
•
•
•
Teachers are strongly encouraged to use community
expertise to bring the “real world” into the classroom.
Exploration of engineering in general with the students
Conventions and conferences
Invitation to a Science Symposium next year (09-10)…!
How to establish contact?
• School board consultants have direct
access and are most often open to
encouraging community support.
• Ministries will generally have their
curricula on their website
(http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca)
• You need to make it relevant:
•
•
How does it connect to the level being taught?
How will this help my students to learn and develop
competency?
Questions or Comments?
Christie Brown
Math, Science and Technology
Services à la communauté anglophone
Ministère de l’éducation, de loisir et du sport
514-873-3339, 5277
Best way to reach me:
• [email protected]
Descargar

Diapositive 1