CH 1: Two Roman
Girls
Part of Speech and Latin
Sentence Structure
Salvete, discipuli et discipulae
Salve, Magistra
Quid nomen tibi est?
Mihi nomen est…
Mihi placet.
Ubi est
Adsum.
Abest.
?
Chapter 1
TWO ROMAN GIRLS
Ecce! In pictūrā est puella, nomine
Cornēlia. Cornēlia est puella Rōmāna quae in
Italiā habitat. Etiam in pictūrā est vīlla rūstica
ubi Cornēlia aestāte habitat. Cornēlia est
laeta quod iam in vīllā habitat. Cornēlia iam
sub arbore sedet et legit. Etiam in pictūrā est
altera puella, nōmine Flāvia. Flāvia est puella
Rōmāna quae in vīllā vīcīnā habitat. Dum
Cornēlia legit, Flāvia scrībit. Laeta est Flāvia
quod Cornēlia iam in vīllā habitat.
5
1. Who is in the picture?
2. Who is Cornelia?
3. What else is in the picture?
4. When does Cornelia live in the country house?
5. How does Cornelia feel about living there?
6. What is she doing?
7. Who else is in the picture?
8. Who is Flavia?
9. What are the two girls doing?
10. Why is Flavia happy?
1a. Responde Latine
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Quis est Cornelia?
Ubi habitat Cornelia?
Cur est Cornelia laeta?
Quid facit Cornelia?
Ubi habitat Flavia?
Quid facit Flavia?
Cur est Flavia laeta?
Let’s Review
•Latin has a more flexible word order than English.
•The verb will usually go at the end of the sentence.
•The adjective will normally come after the noun
•Latin doesn’t have articles (“a”, “an”, or “the”).
•A present tense Latin verb can be translated 3 ways
sedet: she sits, she is sitting, she does sit
Let’s Review (Con’t)
•Latin doesn’t use helping verbs, such as is, am, do,
does. It’s built into the verb.
•The girl is running.
Puella currit.
•When est is used, it’s the only verb in the sentence.
•Cornelia est puella.
•Latin has the same parts of speech as English
•Verbs
adverbs
prepositions
•Nouns
conjunctions
articles
•Adjectives
interjections
pronouns
Nomen? Verbum? Adjectivum?
In pictura est puella.
nomen
In pictura est villa ubi
nomen
Cornelia aestate habitat.
nomen
Corrnelia sub arbore sedet
nomen
et legit.
In pictura est altera puella,
nomine Flavia.
verbum
adiectivum
nomen
Dum Cornelia legit,
Flavia scribit.
verbum
Answer the following questions after reading the Introduction on pages xii – xv of your
text.
1. Who are the members of the family featured in our reading?
2. When do the readings take place? What important event occurred just prior to
the readings?
3. What sort of place was Baiae? Who lived there? What do you think would be a
modern equivalent?
4. English is considered to be a hybrid between Germanic and Romance
languages. What are the other 5 Romance languages? What other languages
do you think are Germanic?
5. How did Latin words come into English? What does English have that Latin
does not?
Quis est puella? Puella est Cornelia quae aestate in villā rusticā habitat.
Cornelia in villā rusticā est laeta quod sub arbore legit. In villā vicinā
habitat altera puella Romana, nomine Flavia.
Hodie Cornelia in villā sedet et legit. Ubi est Flavia? Ecce! Etiam in
villā sedet Flavia. Quid facit Flavia? Flavia scribit dum Cornelia legit. Flavia
est laeta quod in villā scribit.
Parts of Speech
The boy yelled, “Help!” and he saw
a brave dog quickly run to the rescue.
Noun
Pronoun
Verb
A noun is the name of a person, place or
thing.
A pronoun is used in place of a noun in a
sentence. A pronoun may take the place of
the name of a person, place, or thing.
A verb tells what action someone or
something is doing, or it can express a state
of being.
Person
girl
boy
teacher
Place
school
home
store
Thing
pencil
jacket
dog
I
you
he, she, it
we
you
they
(y’all)
Action
run
jump
sit
ask
think talk
State of Being
am
is
are
was
were
Adjective
Article
Adverb
An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun.
An adjective tells what kind, how many, or
which one.
The words a, an, and the belong to a special
group of adjectives called articles. An article
can be used before a noun in a sentence.
An adverb describes a verb, adjective, or
another adverb. An adverb tells how, when,
where, or to what degree.
What Kind
happy
brave
How Many
more
six
Which One
this
that
A
a dog
a rabbit
An
an apple
an ant
The
the boy
the bird
When
today
How Where To What Degree
quickly outside
barely
Preposition
Conjunction
Interjection
A preposition combines with a noun or
pronoun to form a phrase that tells
something about another word in a
sentence. It very often refers to location in
time or space.
A conjunction joins together single words or
groups of words in a sentence.
An interjection expresses strong feeling or
emotion. An interjection can be a single
word or a phrase.
from
over
to
with
until
after
and
but
or
nor
Help!
Ugh!
My goodness!
Oh!
Whew!
Look out!
Ouch!
Ah!
Oh dear!
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