An Introduction to
ELECTRONIC RECORDS
MANAGEMENT
Dr. Patricia C. Franks, CRM
Associate Professor
MARA Program Coordinator
SLIS Internship Coordinator
School of Library & Information Science
San José State University
San José, CA
1
Workshop Topics
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Introduction to Electronic Records Management
Role of Records Management in an Information
Governance Strategy
Electronic Records Management Program
Fundamentals
Systems Design/Functional Requirements
Metadata Standards
Custodian vs. Non-custodial Models of ERM
Emerging Technology and New Forms of
Unstructured Data
Getting Started with Real World Examples
2
Electronic Records
Management
Part 1
3
Records
Information created, received, and
maintained as evidence and
information by an organization or
person, in pursuance of legal
obligations or in the transaction of
business.
~ISO 15489-1
4
Electronic Records
(also digital record; automated record, largely obsolete),
n. ~ Data or information that has been captured and fixed
for storage and manipulation in an automated system and
that requires the use of the system to render it
intelligible by a person.
~SAA Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology.
Information captured through electronic means, and which
may or may not have a paper record to back it up. Also
called machine readable record.
~Business Dictionary.com
5
General Characteristics of a
Record
Content
 Context
 Structure

+ Metadata
~ISO 15489-1:2001
6
Characteristics of an
Authoritative Record

Authenticity – An authentic record can be proven to be
what it purports to be, created or sent by the person
purported to have created or sent it, and create or sent at
the time purported.

Reliability – A reliable record can be trusted as a full and
accurate representation of the transactions, activities, or
fact to which it attests.

Integrity – A complete and unaltered record is said to
possess integrity.

Usability – A usable record can be located, retrieved,
presented, and interpreted.
~ISO 15489-1:2001
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Records and Information
Management
The field of management responsible
for the efficient and systematic control
of the creation, receipt, maintenance,
use, and disposition of records,
including processes for capturing and
maintaining evidence of and information
about business activities and
transactions in the form of records.
~ISO 15489-1
8
Electronic Records
Management (ERM)
(1)
The application of records
management principles to electronic
records.
(1)
The management of records using
electronic systems to apply records
management principles (e.g., paper,
CDs/DVDs, magnetic tape, audio-visual, and
other physical records).
~ARMA Glossary, 4th edition
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10
Structured Data
The primary key (ID in bold) in
each table relates to the same ID
in another table.
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Everything else!
12
Each different type of file has a
different file format (format for encoding
information in a file)
http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/ans
wer.py?hl=en&answer=35287
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Records Management
Lifecycle
The span of time of a records from
its creation or receipt, through its
useful life, to its final disposition,
whether that disposition is
destruction or retention as a
historical record.
~ARMA, Requirements for Managing Electronic Messages as Records
15
Records Management Lifecycle
Creation
Archival
Preservation
Retention &
Destruction
Distribution
& Use
Storage &
Maintenance
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Information Lifecycle
Management (ILM)

ILM is not a technology - it is a combination
of processes and technologies that
determines how data flows through an
environment. It helps end users manage data
from the moment it is created to the time it
is no longer needed.

ILM uses a number of technologies and
business methodologies, including the
following: Assessment, Socialization,
Classification, Automation, and Review.
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/79885/The_new_buzzwords_Informati
on_lifecycle_management?pageNumber=1
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Information Lifecycle Model
Creation
Active
Use
SemiActive
Use
Final
Outcome
Information Lifecycle Model, based on model used as a basis for the JISC InfoNet
Information Management infoKits.
http://www.jiscinfonet.ac.uk/information-management/Information-Management.pdf
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Records Continuum
A model of archival science that
emphasizes overlapping characteristics
of recordkeeping, evidence,
transaction, and the identity of the
creator.
~Pearce-Moses, A Glossary of Archival and Records Terminology, ©SAA
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Role of Records Management
in an Information Governance
Strategy
Part 2
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Information Governance
Accountability Framework
Processes
Roles
Standards
Metrics
to encourage desirable behavior
enabling an organization to achieve its goals
22
Information Governance
… the specification of decision
rights and an accountability framework
to encourage desirable behavior in
the valuation, creation, storage, use,
archival and deletion of information.
~Gartner
23
Goes beyond Records Management
because of the focus on electronically
stored information (ESI), which includes
management of metadata, storage
platforms, security classifications, data
privacy attributes, and digital rights
management.
24
Benefits of Effective
Information Governance

Reduce risk

Improve e-discovery and FOIA
preparedness

Increase transparency, trust & reputation

Reduce product and information cycle
times as the result of improved
information flows
25
What is the difference?
Records management with its traditional
focus on retention and disposition of both
paper and electronic records is considered a
component of information governance.
Information governance focuses on the
preservation of confidentiality, integrity,
availability, and quality of ALL electronically
stored information. (ESI).
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27
Generally Accepted Recordkeeping
Principles®
Download the Principles®
handout from:
http://www.arma.org/garp/garp.pdf
Information Governance Maturity Model
5
Transformational
Proactive
Essential
In Development
Sub standard
1
Download PDF from:
http://www.arma.org/garp/Garp%20maturity%20Model.pdf
Information Governance Maturity Model
Download PDF from:
http://www.arma.org/garp/Garp%20maturity%20Model.pdf
Accountability
People
Policies
A senior executive (or person of
comparable authority) oversees the
recordkeeping program and delegates
program responsibility to appropriate
individuals.
The organization adopts policies and
procedures to guide personnel, and ensure
the program can be audited.
Accountability – Level 1
No senior executive (or comparable
authority) responsible for the records
management program.
Records manager role is largely non-existent
or is an administrative and/or clerical role
distributed among general staff.
Accountability – Level 2
Records manager role is recognized, although
he/she is responsible for tactical operation of
the existing program.
May cover paper records only.
Information technology function or
department is de facto lead for storing
electronic information. Not done
systematically. Records manager not involved
in discussions of electronic systems.
Accountability – Level 3
Records manager is an officer of the organization and
responsible for the tactical operation of the ongoing program
on an organization-wide basis.
RM actively engaged in strategic information and records
management initiatives with other officers of the organization.
Senior management is aware of the program.
Organization has defined specific goals related to
accountability.
Accountability – Level 4
The records manager is a senior officer
responsible for all tactical and strategic
aspects of the program.
A stakeholder committee representing all
functional areas and chaired by the records
manager meets on a periodic basis to review
disposition policy and other records
management-related issues.
Records management activities are fully
sponsored by a senior executive.
Accountability – Level 5
The organization’s senior management and its
governing board place great emphasis on the
importance of the program.
CRO
The records management program is directly
responsible to an individual in the senior level of
management, (e.g., chief risk officer, chief compliance
officer, chief information officer) OR,
A chief records officer (or similar title) is directly
responsible for the records management program
and is a member of senior management for the
organization.
The organization’s stated goals related to
accountability have been met.
Transparency
The processes and activities of an
organization’s recordkeeping program shall
be documented in an understandable
manner and be available to all personnel and
appropriate interested parties.
Transparency – Level 5
Transformational
FOIA &
eDiscovery
satisfied !

The organization's senior management considers
transparency as a key component of information
governance.

The organization's stated goals related to transparency
have been met.

The organization has implemented a continuous
improvement process to ensure transparency is
maintained over time.

Software tools that are in place assist in transparency.

Requestors, courts, and other legitimately interested
parties are consistently satisfied with the transparency of
the processes and the response.
Integrity
A recordkeeping program shall be
constructed so the records and
information generated or managed by
or for the organization have a
reasonable and suitable guarantee of
authenticity and reliability.
Integrity – Level 5
Transformational
Audits
There is a formal, defined process for introducing new
record-generating systems and the capture of their
metadata and other authenticity requirements, including
chain of custody. This level is easily and regularly audited.
The organization’s stated goals related to integrity have
been met. The organization can consistently and
confidently demonstrate the accuracy and authenticity of
its records.
Protection
A recordkeeping program shall be
constructed to ensure a reasonable
level of protection to records and
information that are private,
confidential, privileged, secret, or
essential to business continuity.
Protection – Level 5
Transformational
Audits
Executives and/or senior management and the board place
great value in the protection of information.
Audit information is regularly examined and continuous
improvement is undertaken.
The organization’s stated goals related to record
protection have been met.
Inappropriate or inadvertent information disclosure or loss
incidents are rare.
Compliance
The recordkeeping program shall be
constructed to comply with applicable
laws and other binding authorities, as
well as the organization’s policies.
Compliance – Level 5
Transformational
Roles &
Processes
The importance of compliance and the role of records and
information in it are clearly recognized at the senior
management and board levels. Auditing and continuous
improvement
The roles and processes for information management and
discovery are integrated.
The organization’s stated goals related to compliance have
been met.
The organization suffers few or no adverse consequences
based on information governance and compliance failures.
Availability
An organization shall maintain records
in a manner that ensures timely,
efficient, and accurate retrieval of
needed information.
Availability – Level 5
Transformational
Training
The senior management and board levels provide
support to continually upgrade the processes that
affect record availability. There is an organized
training and continuous improvement program.
The organization’s stated goals related to
availability have been met.
There is a measurable ROI to the business as a
result of records availability.
Retention
An organization shall maintain its records
and information for an appropriate time,
taking into account legal, regulatory, fiscal,
operational, and historical requirements.
Retention – Level 5
Transformational
All information
Retention is an important item at the senior management
and board levels. Retention is looked at holistically and is
applied to all information in an organization, not just to
official records.
The organization’s stated goals related to retention have
been met.
Information is consistently retained for appropriate
periods of time.
Disposition
An organization shall provide secure and
appropriate disposition for records and
information that are no longer required
to be maintained by applicable laws and
the organization’s policies
Disposition – Level 5
Transformational
Integration
Processes
Consistent &
Defensible
The disposition process covers all records and information
in all media. Disposition is assisted by technology and is
integrated into all applications, data warehouses, and
repositories.
Disposition processes are consistently applied and
effective.
Processes for disposition are regularly evaluated and
improved.
The organization's stated goals related to disposition have
been met.
To Get Started
Identify the gaps between the organization's
current practices and the desirable level of
maturity for each principle.
Assess the risk(s) to the organization, based
on the biggest gaps.
Determine whether additional information
and analysis is necessary.
Develop priorities and assign accountability
for further development of the program.
http://www.arma.org/r2/generally-accepted-br-recordkeepingprinciples/principles-health-checkup
Let’s stop to conduct our own
Principles© Health Check!
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Program Improvement Areas
Roles & Responsibilities
 Polices & Procedures
 Communication & Training
 Systems & Automation

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Assigning Ownership of the principles based
on the EDRM Model
ERM Program Fundamentals
Part 3
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Phases in Planning & Managing an ERM
Program
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Inventory e-records
Link to the business process
Develop a taxonomy
Create a retention and disposition schedule
Protect vital records
Franks, P. (2013). Records and Information Management, p. 162.
ALA/Neal-Schuman Publishers, Chicago, IL.
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Electronic Records Inventory – Some
thoughts

An inventory is a descriptive listing of each record series
or system, together with its location and other pertinent
data (NARA).

It can be conducted at the same time as the physical
inventory or independently and is used as the basis for
developing a retention schedule and can be used to
identify RM problems (e.g., insufficient identification of
vital records and inadequate security and privacy
practices).

It will form the basis for management decisions and assist
organizations in fulfilling current and future obligations
when faced with e-discovery and/or FOI requests.

It should concentrate on logical collections of records
grouped by business function or subject and not on
physical locations.
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To Conduct the Inventory:






Determine the scope
Identify who will be involved
Understand the environment and
culture
Develop a strategy
Gather inventory data
Follow up
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Electronic Records Inventory – Location of
Electronic Records

Centralized information systems: email servers,
content/document/records repositories, enterprise-wide
application servers, and legacy systems.

Decentralized information systems: Work units develop
their own information technology resources to meet
needs not relevant to other work units in the organization
(e.g., 911 computer dispatch system in fire department).

Personal work stations an storage devices: Other
decentralized locations such as PC hard drives, laptops,
digital cameras, smartphones, and tablets.

Third-party systems: Social networking sites and cloud
service providers (e.g., IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, and STaaS).
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Document Management Systems (DMS)
The use of a computer system and software to store, manage and
track electronic documents and electronic images of paper based
information captured through the use of a document scanner. The term
document is defined as "recorded information or an object which can
be treated as a unit".
DM systems allow documents to be modified and managed but
typically lack the records retention and disposition functionality
for managing records. Key DM features are: Check In / Check Out
and Locking,Version Control, Roll back, Audit Trail, and Annotation.
http://www.aiim.org/What-is-Document-Management#sthash.JqZEtG1s.dpuf
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Content Management System
(CMS)
The term content management system can be used to describe
specific types of systems in use for different purposes or
within different industries, for example:
Web content management system: Allow users to maintain a
website using a simple web-browser-based interface (instead
of manually authoring webpages).
Industry-specific content management system: For example,
the Care Converge healthcare WCMS that allows healthcare
organizations to create and manage consumer websites and
portals.
Social content management system: Combine social
networking applications (e.g., blogs, wikis, image sharing) into
one suite to make it easy to manage and share social content
without building silos of information.
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Enterprise Content Management
System (ECMS)
Enterprise Content Management System: ECMS are used to
control unstructured content so that the information can be
put to use in daily operations. But they are also designed to
protect digital documents (primarily text and graphics) that
serve as accurate and complete evidence of transactions.
According to AIIM, ECMS are able to perform five major
functions:
 Capture: Create, obtain, and organize information.
 Manage: Process, modify, and employ information.
 Store: Temporarily back up frequently changing information in
the short term.
 Preserve: Back up infrequently changing information in the
medium
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Enterprise Information
Systems (EIS)
The applications that constitute an enterprise's existing system for
handling companywide information. These applications provide an
information infrastructure for an enterprise. An enterprise
information system offers a well-defined set of services to its
clients. These services are exposed to clients as local or
remote interfaces or both. Examples of enterprise information
systems include enterprise resource planning systems, mainframe
transaction processing systems, and legacy database systems.
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Collect data:










System title
Business Owner
IT Owner
Dates covered
System description
File type & format
Quantity and estimated
growth
Hardware
Software
Media characteristics








Relationship to other
records
Retention
requirements
Supporting files
Backup procedures
Provisions for
migration
Reference & retrieval
Restrictions on use
Vital records status
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Electronic Records Inventory and an
ESI Data Map & Data Atlas
A data map must be maintained for
centralized and decentralized systems.
 It must include internal collaboration
tools such as SharePoint.
 It must also include information hosted
by social media sites and third-party
providers, including records stored in
the clouds.

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Electronic Records Inventory and an
ESI Data Map & Data Atlas (cont.)
The data map (or maps) supplemented by
charts, lists, and tables, with supplementary
illustrations and analyses that describe the
information and the infrastructure and
systems that host the information, provides a
“total information systems overview” known
as a data atlas.
~Wayne Wong. “Managing your way to compliance with a data atlas,”
Information Management (January/February 2012), 21-29.
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NARA recommends that e-records
are inventoried by information
system, versus file series, which is
the traditional approach for physical
records.
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Let’s stop to complete data
fields for an Electronic
Records Inventory!
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A taxonomy is a subject-based
classification scheme used to arrange
terms in a controlled vocabulary
into a hierarchical structure showing
parent-child relationships. In a simple
taxonomy, each item being classified
fits into just one place in the
taxonomy, with a single parent and
any number of children.
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A records
classification scheme
is also referred to as
a file plan.
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State Government Regulatory Agency
Functional Taxonomy
Accounting
Procurement
Contracts and Agreements
Licensing and Certification
Technical Assistance
Permitting
Compliance and Enforcement
Function
Inspections
Activities
Complaints
Emergency Response
Enforcement
Notice of Violation
Transactions
Consent Decree
Request for Response Actions
Stipulation Agreement
Categorized based on functions an activities that produce them
(Function/Activity/Transactions).
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The Vermont Functional Classification
System (VCLAS) Model
Areas of
Accountability
(Domains)
Government function or
concern defined by law
Public Agencies
Legislation
Creation/Dissolution
Administrative history
Predecessors
Successors
Legislative Acts
Vermont Statutes
Agency Rules
United States Code
Federal Regulations
Activities
Performances required
under law
Transactions
Specific tasks or transactions
that are evidenced by the
records created or received
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Records Appraisal
Appraisal (records): The evaluation of a document’s
worth or value for retention or archival purposes, based
upon its current or predicted future use(s) for
administrative, legal, fiscal, research, or historical
purposes.
~ARMA Glossary, 4th edition
81
Value of Records
Primary value: administrative, fiscal, legal, and
operational—derived from original use for which they
were created.
Secondary value: useful or significant based on purposes
other than that for which they were originally created.
Includes information or evidential value as well as
research value.
Legal value: Can be either primary or secondary,
depending on the purpose and function of a record.
Vital records may be identified in e-records inventory or the
subject of a paper or separate vital records inventory.
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Records Series
Records series: A group of related records
filed/used together as a unit and evaluated as a
unit for retention purposes; e.g., a personnel file
consisting of an application, reference letters,
benefit forms, etc.
~ARMA International, 4th edition
Laws and rules will determine retention
requirement; e.g., 6 years after last action
unless legal action prevents destruction.
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Records Retention & Disposition
Schedule
Records Retention Schedule (RSS): A
comprehensive list of records series
titles, indicating for each series the
length of time it is to be maintained.
~ARMA International, 4th edition
84
Texas State Records Retention
Schedule (Revised 4th edition)
Effective July 4, 2012
https://www.tsl.state.tx.us/slrm/recordspubs/rrs4.html#r3.1
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Benefits of Disposing of
Electronic Records

Mitigating the risk of retaining records that
could be used against the organization (the
proverbial smoking gun)

Reducing the cost of locating the requested
records in response to e-discovery or
freedom of information requests

Reducing the cost of inspecting records to
redact personally identifiable information (PII),
such as SSN, credit card numbers, and driver’s
license numbers.
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Big Buckets
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Vital Records
A vital record is recorded information,
regardless of format (e.g., paper, digital,
electronic, film, and tape) that contains
information required by an organization to
recreate its legal and financial status and to
preserve the rights and obligations of
stakeholders, including employees, customers,
investors, and citizens.
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Classification of Records as vital,
important, useful, or nonessential
89
Vital Records
Vital records specify:
1. How an organization will operate during an
emergency or disaster
2. Those records necessary to the continued
operations of the organization, and
3. Those records needed to protect the legal
and financial rights of all stakeholders.
90
Vital Records Program
consists of…
• the assignment of vital records program responsibilities,
• the identification of vital records through a vital records
inventory,
• a review of the protection methods currently in place for
vital records and information,
• the establishment of vital records policies and procedures,
• the creation of a disaster preparedness and recovery plan,
• the development of a business continuity plan, and
• the implementation of auditing procedures to maintain
ongoing and effective programs.
California Records and Information Management, Department of General Services, Vital
Records Protection and Disaster Recovery Handbook (Sacramento, CA: California Department of
General Services, n.d.), 2, http://www.documents.dgs.ca.gov/osp/calrim/disasterhndbk1203.pdf.
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Storage media and length of
record life
92
Let’s pause to discuss:
Electronic Records and Your State
Archives
93
Systems Design/Functional
Requirements
Part 4
94
Implementation Strategies for
Compliant Records Systems
Designing records systems,
Documenting records systems,
Training records practitioners and other
personnel,
 Converting records to new records systems,
formats, and controls,
 Setting standards and measuring compliance
and performance against them
 Determining retention periods and making
decisions about records which have
continuing value, in keeping with the
regulatory environment.



~ISO 15489-1:2001
95
Records systems characteristics
Reliability
 Integrity
 Compliance
 Comprehensiveness
 Systematic

~ISO 15489-1:2001
96
Records systems functionality
Document records transactions
 Physical storage medium and
protection
 Distributed management
 Conversion and migration
 Access, retrieval and use
 Retention and disposition

~ISO 15489-1:2001
97
ERM SYSTEM GUIDANCE

US DoD 5015.02-STD: Electronic
Records Management Software
Applications Design Criteria
Standard

European Modular Requirements
for Records systems (MoReq2010)
98
DoD 5015.2-STD - Electronic
Records Management Software
Applications Design Criteria Standard



Presents mandatory baseline functional requirements—
as well as requirements for classified marking, access
control, and other processes—and identifies nonmandatory but desirable features for managing the
lifecycle of electronic records.Version 3 incorporates
requirements for RMA-to-RMA interoperability and
archival transfer to NARA.
Also includes requirements for managing non-electronic
(paper) records; simply the capability to create a profile
(metadata representation of a physical record) and to
include the physical location. .
Is required for acquisition of RMA systems within the
DoD. Versions 2 and 3 were endorsed by NARA for
use by all Federal agencies.
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100
101
A real-world example
102
Modular Requirements for Records
Systems (MoReq2010)

The MoReq2010 specification was designed for users of
electronic records, experts in records management, and
suppliers of ERMS software outside of the United
States.

May 2011, this version contains functional and
nonfunctional requirements for records systems as
defined by ISO 15489-1:2001.

Because it is a modular specification, it can be extended
to allow for specialized application in different
jurisdictions, markets, and industry sectors, including
healthcare, finance, defense, and legal.
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http://www.dlmforum.eu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=169&Itemid=166&lang=en
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Utah Department of Administrative Services, Division of State Archives
http://www.geomapp.net/docs/ut_ERMBusinessCase.pdf
109
http://public.ccsds.
org/sites/cwe/rids/
Lists/CCSDS%2065
00P11/Attachment
s/650x0p11.pdf
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From the June 17, 2013 Open Archival Information System (OAIS):
An Introduction
111
Records Management
Metadata
Part 5
112
Metadata
“Structured information that describes,
explains, locates, or otherwise makes it
easier to retrieve, use, or manage an
information resource.”
~NISO
113
3 Types of Metadata



Descriptive (describes the intellectual
content of the object; e.g., XML is an
encoding language used to describe
content)
Structural (describes the physical
and/or logical structure of complex
digital objects; for example, how pages
should be assembled into a book)
Administrative (rights management
and preservation metadata)
114
Records Management
Metadata


Documents the business context in which
records are created or captured, as well as the
content, structure and appearance of those
records.
Documents records management and business
processes in which records are subsequently
used, including any changes to the content,
structure and appearance.
Structure of a record consists of physical or technical structure and
logical structure (relationships between data elements).
~ISO 23081-1:2006
115
Metadata Components to
support ISO 15489-1
Metadata about:
 The record itself
 The business rules or polices and
mandates
 Agents
 Business activities or processes
 Records management processes
116
Dublin Core metadata
element set – ISO 15836:2009








Title
Creator
Subject
Description
Publisher
Contributor
Date
Type







Format
Identifier
Source
Language
Relation
Coverage
Rights
<dc:creator>Sam Franks</dc:creator>
117
Custodial vs. Non-Custodial
ERM Models
Example: SharePoint 2013
Part 6
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SharePoint Server
2013 – Records
Management
http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/cc261982.aspx
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Drawbacks of in place RM





Records and mixed in with non-records
May wish to delete a team site
(SharePoint) but one declared record
resides there.
Backing up Records requires backing up
non-records as well
Less control of records and security for
records managers
No easy mechanism to report on all in
place records across the SharePoint
environment
123
Select & Implement an ERMS
Establish the Project Plan
 Determine the Business Requirements
 Understand the Functional Requirements
 Determine if the system will manage purely
physical records, purely electronic records or
both (hybrid)
 Prepare and publish a Request for Information
(RFI) or a Request for Proposal (RFP)
 Select a system and vendor
 Configure and Implement the ERMS
 Monitor the system
 Achieve success!

http://www.irmt.org/documents/educ_training/term%20modules/IRMT%20TERM%20Module%202.pdf 124
Emerging Technologies &
New Forms of Unstructured
Data
Part 7
125
Emerging technologies to
consider

Social media

Cloud computing

Mobile computing

Big Data
126
127
http://govsm.com/w/Federal_Agencies
Case Studies
Agency
Challenge
Initiative
Department of
Energy
15,000 geographically
dispersed employees using
decentralized information
systems in 17 national
laboratories and 14
technical facilities
Powerpedia (wiki)
Request from foreign
diplomats is help for
citizens to learn English
90-day pilot in Tunisia using English
language instruction app for
devices called feature phone.
Department of
State
Now 15,000 pages, 700 edits a day,
1 million page views.
535,000 participants out of 10
million population
Air Force
Medical Service
(AFMS)
128
75 medical treatment
facilities worldwide and
more than 1 million
service members and their
families had to visit a clinic
in person for answers to
healthcare questions
AFMS Surgeon General Facebook
page built out to become primary
dissemination point for content.
Two years later 86% of AFMS’s
medical facilities use the site to
communicate and add information.
In the news…
Virginia Court Accepts Digitally Notarized Deed
The week of June 10 marked a first in the world of digital records as the Circuit Court of
Alexandria,Va., accepted what it believes is the first digitally notarized property deed in the
country, according to a report on The Chattanoogan. Chattanooga, Tenn.-based digital
signature company SIGNiX partnered with Trustmark Certification Services to allow an
American couple in France to complete the digital, remote notarization of a property deed.
In addition to making things simpler for customers, managing these types of processes
digitally makes records management easier and more secure, Harris said. The types of
security and authentication they use, he said, isn’t proprietary, which means customers don’t
have to worry about getting tied to SIGNiX as a vendor. “It’s based on international
cryptographic standards and that provides a lot of benefits in the long term for the signed
document,” he said.
The State of Arkansas is one of the leaders for delivering government
services via mobile devices. On http://mobile.ar.gov, citizens can access a
wide array of services, such as secure payment processing for real estate
taxes, voter registration status, employment opportunity search, and
others. The services are available on any smartphone operating platform,
including iPhone, Blackberry, Google Android, Windows Mobile, and Palm.
130
131
132
Get Started with Real
World Examples
Part 8
133
http://gcn.com/ar
ticles/2013/01/0
9/oregon-cloudstatewiderecordsmanagementsystem.aspx
See also PDF
file of
paradigm
Records
Management in
the Cloud
written by
Mary Beth
Herkert, CRM,
CA, Oregon
State Archivist,
134
Entity Model - From ISO
23081-1: 2006
http://vermont-archives.org/records/standards/pdf/MetadataGuideline2008.pdf
135
136
137
Let’s pause to discuss: The
Impact of Emerging Technologies
on your State Archives
138
Once you decide on an ERM
Project, follow these steps:
Define the aims and objectives of the
project
 Define the project scope
 Determine the deliverables
 Identify project personnel
 Establish and maintain communications
 Ensure quality control
 Prepare project documentation, including
project plan, risk register, reports.
 Establish evaluation procedures

http://www.irmt.org/documents/educ_training/term%20modules/IRMT%20TERM%20Module%202.pdf
139
Thank you!
Patricia C. Franks, Ph.D., CRM
MARA Program Coordinator
School of Library and Information Science
San Jose State University
[email protected]
Dr. Patricia C. Franks | SJSU | 7/9/2013
140
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Electronic Records Management Presentation