The Body, Gender, and Dance
within Shakespeare’s The Tempest
A PowerPoint Presentation
Created By: Rebecca Corley
Aims :
To provide contextual information
on Shakespeare’s The Tempest
To introduce Peter Greenaway’s
cinematic adaptation of the text
To stimulate class discussion
regarding the inclusion of The
Body, Gender, and Dance within
these two works
Tentative
Outline
• Introduction of topic (2 min.)
• Background Information on William Shakespeare’s The
Tempest (3 min.)
• Biographical Information on Peter Greenaway (6 min.)
• Useful information on/ context of Prospero’s Books (3 min.)
• Video clip from Prospero’s Books (6 min.)
• Questions/Stimulation of Discussion on The Body and
Dance within the the two works (8 min.)
• Concluding remarks (2 min.)
Some Info About the Play:
• Written in 1610 or 1611
• Last play completed by Shakespeare, with the
exception of Two Noble Kinsmen, which he coauthored
• The Tempest is the fourth, final, and the finest of
Shakespeare's great and/or late romances
• belongs to the genre of Elizabethan romance plays,
along with Pericles, Cymbeline, and The Winter's Tale
• One widely held view is that the play was
Shakespeare’s farewell to the stage-- that in it he
indicates to his audience that he will no longer write
for them and that the character of Prospero is
biographical.
• “The richness of The Tempest as theater is matched by
the extraordinary thematic complexity of its text . . .”
Hmmm . . .
Key Term:
Tragi-comedy: a
play with elements of
both tragedy and
comedy (i.e. a happy
ending, yet
suggestions of an
other-than-happy
ending)
A LITTLE BIT about the Director…
Peter Greenaway
• born in Newport, Wales, in 1942
• studied painting at Walthamstow College of Art
• worked at the Central Office of Information for 11
years
• made first short film, Train, in 1966 by filming the
last of the steam trains coming into Waterloo
Station, then recasting it as a mechanical ballet
with a musique concrete score.
• received enormous critical acclaim and
international recognition for his first feature film
The Draughtman's Contract (1982)
• has produced a wealth of short and featurelength films, but also paintings, novels and other
books, and has held several one-man shows and
curated exhibitions at museums world-wide
A (Short?) Filmography:
“Everything
is permissible
in art.”
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1966
1967
1969
1971
1975
1977
1978
1980
1982
1982
Train
Revolution
Intervals
Erosion
Windows
Dear Phone
1-100
The Falls
Act of God
The Draughtman’s Contract
Cont’d…
and more films…
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
Making a Splach
Inside Rooms-26 Bathrooms
A Zed and Two Noughts
The Belly of an Architect
Drowning by Numbers
A TV Dante- Cantos 1-8
Prospero’s Books
Rosa
The Baby of Macon
The Stairs, Geneva
The Pillow Book
These are the twenty-four books that
Gonzalo hastily threw into
Prospero's boat as he was pushed
out into the sea to begin his exile.
These books enabled Prospero to
find his way across the oceans, to
combat the malignancies of Sycorax,
to colonise the island, to free Ariel,
to educate and entertain Miranda, to
summon tempests and bring his
enemies to heel.
Prospero’s Books
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
The Book of Water
A Book of Mirrors
A Book of Mythologies
A Primer of the Small Stars
An Atlas Belonging to Orpheus
A Harsh Book of Geometry
The Book of Colours
The Vesalius Anatomy of Birth
An Alphabetical Inventory of the Dead
A Book of Travelers' Tales
The Book of the Earth
A Book of Architecture and Other Music
Prospero’s Books (cont’d)
13. The Ninety-Two Conceits of the Minotaur
14. The Book of Languages
15. End-plants
16. A Book of Love
17. A Bestiary of Past, Present, and Future Animals
18. The Book of Utopias
19. The Book of Universal Cosmography
20. Lore of Ruins
21. The Autobiographies of Pasiphae and Semiramis
22. A Book of Motion
23. The Book of Games
24. Thirty-Six Plays
What do you think?
• Is Miranda’s position
equal in stature to the
other (all male)
characters in the play?
• Consider:
(Prospero, to Miranda)
“Silence! one word more
shall make me chide thee,
if not hate thee. What! An
advocate for an imposter!
hush! Thou think'st there
is no more such shapes as
he, Having seen but him
and Caliban: foolish
wench!” Act I, Scene II
•
For Discussion :
Do you think the portrayal of
Caliban within the film
Prospero’s Books serves to
represent his character
accurately? Why or why not?
(Hint: Think about the
choreography!)
Other important ideas….?
• How are gender roles
played out within The
Tempest? Does
Greenaway create a
more distinct gender
boundary in his work?
• How does his use of
nudity in the film
affect the gender
roles?
References:
Descargar

Document