CARL D. PERKINS
APPLICATION WORKSHOP
JANUARY 14 – 15, 2015
8 AM- 4:30 PM
CNM WORKFORCE CENTER
5600 EAGLE ROCK AVENUE
ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87113
WELCOME
New Directors Orientation
Purpose of Carl D. Perkins
Career and Technical
Education Act 2006
Eric Spencer
Director, College and Career Readiness Bureau
[email protected]
(505) 827-6420
Introductions
• Eric Spencer, Director CCRB
• Theresa Romero, Perkins Project Manager
• Mary Medina, Education Administrator
• Louise Williams, Education Administrator
• Elaine Perea, PhD, Education Administrator
• Renee Garcia, CCRB Staff Manager
• Mark Curran, Education Administrator
• Barb Armijo, Education Administrator
• Caroline Jaramillo-Crone, CCRB Administrative Assistant
SETTING THE STAGE
Opportunities and Options: Making
Career Preparation Work for
Students
-A Report of the CCSSO Task Force on
Improving Career Readiness
Google: CCSSO task force career readiness
Improving Career Readiness:
Why it Matters
Recommendations to Improve
Career Readiness
Enlist Employer
Community as
Lead Partner
Raise the Bar for
Quality Career
Preparation
Programs
Make Career
Preparation
Matter to
Schools and
Students


Enlist
Employer
Community
as Lead
Partner

Identify sectors
most important to
the state’s economy
Engage in designing
specific knowledge
and skill sets
Establish priorities
and design
pathways
Pathways shall culminate
with degree or credential
 Raise rigor in CTE
programs throughout the
system
 Dramatically expand workbased learning
 Strengthen and expand
career guidance
 Scale up though an
approval process
 Build capacity of educators

Raise the
Bar for
Quality
Career
Preparation
Programs


Make Career
Preparation
Matter to
Schools and
Students
Make CTE a higher
priority in school rating
and accountability
Adapt graduation
requirements and
scholarship criteria to
give students credit for
meeting career
readiness indicators
Taking a Strategic Approach
CCSSO
report and
other
actions
for
improving
CTE
SREB
study of
NM‘s CTE
system
Program of
study
framework
Perkins V
and the
CTE State
Plan
Opportunities and Options:
Making Career Preparation
Work for Students
Questions?
 Recommendations?

Purpose of Carl D. Perkins
Career and Technical Education
Act 2006
Theresa Romero
Perkins Project Manager
[email protected]
(505) 827-6719
College and Career Readiness Bureau
Housekeeping

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Location of restrooms
Cell phones on vibrate
15 minute breaks
Lunch provided by CNM on Day 2 only
Copies of presentations available, plus
online
Overview
Career Technical Education (CTE) provides
students of all ages the academic and technical
skills, knowledge and training necessary to
succeed in future careers and to become
lifelong learners.
CTE Making Its Mark
CTE prepares students for the world of work
by introducing them to workplace
competencies, and makes academic content
accessible to students by providing hands-on
context.
Foundational to CTE are rigorous program
standards. These standards help define highquality CTE Programs of Study (POS) that
align to the National Career Clusters
Framework.
College & Career Readiness Bureau (CCRB) is the
department within the PED responsible for CTE
initiatives:
Our goal is to meet the needs of New Mexico
students in:
• career exploration
• academic achievement
• career preparation
• leadership development
Focus on Quality
•
Integrate academic and career-technical
education through a coherent sequence of
courses
•
Promote student attainment of challenging
academic and career-technical standards
•
Link career-technical education at the secondary
and postsecondary level through career-technical
programs of study
Focus on Quality
•
Provide students with strong experience in, and
understanding of, all aspects of an industry to
include work-based learning
•
Address the needs of individuals who are
members of special populations
•
Involve parents, employers, labor
organizations, and representatives of special
populations
Focus on Quality:
•
Provide strong linkages between secondary and
postsecondary education
•
Develop, improve and expand the use of
technology
•
Provide professional development for secondary
and postsecondary teachers, faculty,
administrators, and career guidance and
academic counselors, in the areas of integration,
best practices, and the use of scientifically based
research data to improve career-technical
education
Perkins POS
•
Incorporates and align secondary with
postsecondary education elements
•
Includes academic and CTE content in a
coordinated, non-duplicative course sequence
•
Offers the opportunity for secondary students to
acquire postsecondary credits
•
Leads to an industry-recognized
credential/certificate (postsecondary) or an
associate or baccalaureate degree
A CTE Student:
•
Acts as a responsible and contributing citizen
and employee
•
Applies appropriate academic and technical
skills
•
Attends to personal health and financial wellbeing
•
Communicates clearly, effectively and with
reason
A CTE Student
•
Considers the environmental, social and
economic impacts of decisions
•
Demonstrates creativity and innovation
•
Employs valid and reliable research strategies
•
Utilizes critical thinking to make sense of
problems and persevere in solving them
A CTE Educator
•
Models integrity, ethical leadership and effective
management
•
Plans education and career paths aligned to
student goals
•
Uses technology to enhance productivity
•
Works productively in teams using economic
awareness
16 National Career Clusters
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources
Architecture & Construction
Arts, A/V Technology & Communications
Business Management & Administration
Education & Training
Finance
Government & Public Administration
Health Science
16 National Career Clusters
9. Hospitality, Tourism
10. Human Services
11. Information Technology
12. Law, Public Safety, Corrections, Security
13. Manufacturing
14. Marketing
15. Science, Technology, Engineering, Math
16. Transportation, Distribution & Logistic
New Mexico 7 Career Clusters
Align with the 16 National Career Clusters
Accountability Indicators
Secondary Level
1S1
1S2
2S1
3S1
4S1
5S1
6S1
6S2
-
Academic Attainment Reading/Language Arts
Academic Attainment Mathematics
Technical Skills Attainment
Secondary School Completion
Student Graduation Rate
Secondary Placement
Nontraditional Participation
Nontraditional Completion
Accountability Indicators
Postsecondary Level
1P1
2P1
3P1
4P1
5P1
5P2
-
Technical Skill Attainment
Credential, Certificate or Diploma
Student Retention or Transfer
Student Placement
Nontraditional Participation
Nontraditional Completion
Through the Carl D. Perkins
grant, educational institutions
are providing individuals with
opportunities throughout their
lifetime to develop, in
conjunction with other education
and training programs, the
knowledge and skills needed to
keep the United States
competitive.
Nine Required Uses
& Special Populations
Leveraging Perkins Funds
To Significantly Improve CTE Programs
Mary Medina
Education Administrator
[email protected]
(505) 827-6723
College and Career Readiness Bureau
The Carl D. Perkins
Career and Technical Act of 2006
“(The Act) will allow students…to get a vision
of what can be achieved, what they can do in
technical education and what they can do in
employment opportunities and what a better
future they can have. This should be billed
as a hope bill…”
Rep. Ralph Regula,
Retired, Ohio Congressman
July 27, 2006
How can your institution
spend Perkins funds?
Your application needs to focus on one or more
of the following nine uses
Nine Required Uses
All nine must be addressed before spending funds for
other purposes.
1.
Strong/rigorous CTE programs
2. Secondary programs linked to postsecondary CTE
programs
3. Work-based learning experiences that enhance
understanding of all aspects of an industry
4. Develop, expand and improve the use of technology
in CTE courses
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Develop/attend professional development programs
Develop/implement evaluations of CTE programs
Initiate, improve, expand, and modernize CTE programs,
including relevant technology
Provide service/activities that are of sufficient size, scope and
quality to be effective.
Prepare special student populations (single parents, displaced
homemakers, disabled, ELL students and others) for highskill, high-wage, high-demand occupations.
Required Use #1
To strengthen the academic and career &
technical skills of students participating in
career & technical programs.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Implementation of research based strategies and best
practices
Infusion of academic skills into technical courses
Using occupationally related applied learning strategies
in academic courses
Aligning and linking academic content with challenging
academic standards
Using advisory committees to validate learning
outcomes
Create a rigorous, integrated and aligned curriculum
Encourage academic and technical instructors to jointly
develop curriculum
Required Use #2
To link CTE at the secondary level with CTE
at postsecondary level.
Secondary/postsecondary articulation
• Update or expand articulation agreements
• Create aligned and non-duplicative sequence of
courses
•
o Concurrent enrollment and /or dual credit
o Establishing policies and procedures for awarding
advance placement and credits
o Track and increase the utilization of existing articulation
agreement
Required Use #3
To provide students with strong experiences in the
understanding of all aspects of an industry, which
may include work-based learning experiences.
Infuse all aspects of an industry into curricula and services.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Regional labor market statistics, trends and job requirements
Horizontal and vertical career ladders to broaden career
horizons
General employability skills needed for career mobility and
success
Industry-wide management and production/service issues
Expertise in classroom setting (guest speakers, field
trips, other resources)
Use qualified business/industry professionals as adjunct faculty
Validate curricula outcomes by program advisory committees
Coordinate business/industry experiences for students
Required Use #4
To develop, improve or expand the use of
technology in career and technical
education.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Infuse and expand relevant technology in programs
Upgrade new technology and equipment
Develop or update realistic multi-year equipment
replacement schedules
Ensure students acquire the technology related skills
needed for entry to high-skill careers
Collaborate with technology industries to provide
internships, mentoring, and employment experiences for
students
Employ personnel to coordinate work – based technology
experiences
Required Use #5
To provide professional development programs.
Establishing intensive and sustained professional development
programs. Focus professional development activities on instruction.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Strategies for achieving NM common core standards
Methods for effectively integrating academic and technical education
Incorporation of applied learning strategies
Techniques for teaching “all aspects of an industry”
Stay current with needs, expectations, practices of business/industry
Research based effective teaching skills
Effective use and application of technology to improve instruction
Improve instruction for special populations, including nontraditional
Use of student and program assessment data to improve instruction
Comprehensive professional development plan for each educator
Involve participants in determination and evaluation of in-service activities
Required Use #6
To develop and implement evaluations of
the career & technical education programs
carried out with funds.
Assess and analyze:

o
o
o
o
o
o
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Attainment of NM Common Core Standard indicators
Student numbers and trends (enrollment, completion, placement, etc.)
Levels of student satisfaction
Extent of academic and technical integration in courses/programs
Involvement of business / industry
Relevance of program to regional labor market
Create and implement student achievement and program evaluations
Develop strategic improvement plans based upon assessments
Utilize program advisory committees
Ensure preparation for nontraditional fields
Track and report industry-recognized credential, certificate or degrees awarded
Required Use #7
Initiate, improve, expand, modernize quality
CTE programs, including relevant technology.
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Expand program offerings at times or in formats more
accessible for students
Curriculum development activities
Acquire external business and industry related program
certifications/accreditations
Implement program modifications to ensure program and
student learning outcomes are aligned with business and
industry standards
Involve program advisory committees in improving and
modernizing programs
Required Use #8
Provide services and activities that are of sufficient
size, scope, and quality to be effective.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Refining programs to incorporate elements in the definition of Program of
Study
Ensure classrooms/laboratory settings simulate workplace environments
Staffing programs with adequate personnel
Increase student enrollment, completion and placement to justify
program continuation
Basing breadth and depth of learning outcomes on current job
requirements
Using program advisory committees to evaluate and validate relevancy of
learning outcomes
Ensuring programs prepare students for high skill, wage or demand
occupations
Improve accessibility to program information and statistics for prospective
students and the public
Provide career guidance and academic counseling
Required Use #9
Provide activities to prepare special populations, including
single parents and displaced homemakers who are enrolled in
career & technical education programs for high-skill, highwage, or high-demand occupations that will lead to
sufficiency.
•
•
•
•
•
Establish or refine non-discrimination policies and procedures
Implement strategies to overcome program enrollment and
completion barriers
Redesign programs to enable attainment of NM Common Core
Standards indicators
Make modifications to curriculum or equipment
Expand/align student services (assessment, counseling, financial
assistance, job placement, etc.)
Special Populations
Students:
 With disabilities
 From economically disadvantaged families,
including foster children
 Preparing for non-traditional fields
 Who are single parents, including single
pregnant women
 Who are displaced homemakers
 With limited English proficiency
 Who are migrant workers
Special pops are
required use #9
Ideas to help subgroups
Use funds to supplement, not supplant, assistance
that is otherwise available from non-Federal
sources, and assistance may only be provided to
an individual to the extent that it is needed to
address barriers to the individual’s successful
participation in career and technical education.

An allowance for books, supplies, transportation,
dependent care, and miscellaneous personal
expenses for a student attending the institution
on at least half-time basis as determined by the
institution
Assuring access
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Comprehensive career counseling and guidance, including
labor market information , career testing, placement
services for part-time, summer employment, internships
and cooperative programs
Facilitate the identification of appropriate adaptive
equipment, assistive devices, and new technology for
students with disabilities, as funding is available
Promote outreach and recruitment information regarding
career opportunities with an emphasis on nontraditional
opportunities
Provide in-service activities for vocational and technical
teachers, counselors, and administrators
Identify and/or develop special instructional materials or
adapting existing instructional materials
Success for Special Populations
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Provide mentors and role models from the
school, workforce and community to whom
special population students can relate
Offer job readiness workshops including resume
preparation and interview skills
Include industry speakers and presentations in
the curriculum
Offer modularized instruction and short-term
training with flexible schedules
Provide distance learning options when
appropriate
Provide tutoring services
More Strategies
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Ensure classrooms are work-based learning sites
Ensure all students, especially special population
students, have access to technology
Organize staff development activities that inform
them of the needs and challenges special populations
face and enhance employees’ abilities to overcome
these barriers
Ensure campus is accessible to all students and has
specialized equipment to support learning
Make sure bilingual maps of campuses are available
Make technology centers available in the evenings
and/or weekends
Supporting special populations
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Create and distribute recruitment materials in
languages of the demographic group
Provide copies of textbooks for loan to students
Organize career development activities that lead to
mastery of career development competencies
Refer students to financial aid and work-study
opportunities
Provide vouchers /other supports for materials, tools,
and/or transportation
Include diverse student role models (particularly
nontraditional students) in recruitment and
motivational speaking events
Special Population Success
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Identify services available in the community
(counseling, social services, transportation
support, etc.)
Provide information on nontraditional jobs that
offer higher pay and opportunities for
advancement and benefits
Identify and promote linkages with the
community (adult schools, businesses, workforce
agencies, public assistance offices, child care
agencies, etc.)
Teach students financial responsibility by offering
training in setting budgets, using bank accounts and
services
Help students to be successful
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Incorporate career exploration and planning
strategies into the Next Step Plans
Provide guidance to students and parents on
identifying and selecting postsecondary
institutions, and on the process for
applications and registration
USE YOUR DATA – For retention of special
populations, improve student performance
and provide professional development for
staff
Training for Non-Trad Careers
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Encourage participation in STEM courses since these classes are
often the gateway for nontraditional careers
Evaluate school materials (including recruitment) for gender bias
and positive nontraditional images
Debunk stereotyping myths that careers are gender specific
Foster self-esteem and self-efficacy in potential nontraditional
students
Provide on-campus presentations or field trips where students
can meet successful nontraditional workers
Offer job-shadowing experiences with nontraditional workers
Conduct professional development to increase awareness of
gender bias and stereotyping and to eliminate sexual harassment.
Recruit and place nontraditional students in cohorts to provide a
supportive and inclusive environment
Expenditures
Allowable/lawful as per Federal cost
principles (OMB circular)
 Necessary for operation of the program of
study
 Reasonable - appropriate
 Allocable- support or advance the
objective of the program of study

Funding Limits
Career and Technical Education Programs
must have sufficient local and state funds to
enable them to operate without federal
Perkins funds.
Perkins funds are to be used to supplement,
upgrade and improve Career and Technical
Education programs and not simply to
maintain the program at its current level.
Thank You
Mary Medina
 Education Administrator
 College and Career Readiness Bureau
 [email protected]
 505-827-6723

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Perkins performance measures