Drew Quayle© 2013
ACORN data
Acorn School Classification by NCY based
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Hit the ground running.
Drew Quayle© 2013
“It should be learning and teaching, not
teaching and learning”, HMI.
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Quality of learning
What are different groups and individual pupils actually learning as opposed to doing?
Are pupils consolidating previous skills/knowledge or learning something new?
Can all pupils make the links between previous/new learning?
Can pupils talk about what they are learning, as opposed to simply describing what they are doing?
Do they consistently produce work of a good standard?
Are pupils working independently? Are they self-reliant – do they make the most of the choices they are given or do they find it difficult
to make choices? To what extent do pupils take responsibility for their own learning?
How well do pupils collaborate with others? Do they ask questions, of each other, of the teacher or other adults, about what they are
learning?
Are pupils creative? Do they show initiative?
How well do pupils follow routines/expectations?
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Enjoyment of learning and attitudes
Are pupils engaged, working hard, making a good effort, applying themselves, concentrating and productive?
Are pupils developing habits of good learning?
Are pupils happy with their work? Are they proud of it?
Are pupils interested in their work and in what they are learning? Or are they easily distracted?
How smooth is the transition from teacher input to group work? Do pupils settle to work easily?
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Assessment to support learning
Are there any significant differences in the learning of different groups of pupils, or of any individuals?
Are pupils involved in assessing their own learning and progress?
Do pupils know what they are learning and why?
Do pupils have targets and do they understand what they mean/what to do to achieve them?
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Drew Quayle© 2013
Lesson Observation Form
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Workbook Scrutiny Form
Drew Quayle© 2013
Year
Group:
2
Class/es:
Fig
Yew
Planning:
Work Sample:
Data / Assessment:
Across Year 2 many opportunities for cross-curricular
mathematics has been seen within a range of
subjects (eg. WB 16.4.12 Geography, WB 7.5.12,
Science measuring melting objects). The key
mathematical skills are mentioned in other subject
planning on the STP (eg. 23.4.12 Geography, creating
a 3D pirate ship). But these links could be made more
explicit. Some links made on MTP (using a timeline
within History, measuring within DT), but again the
link needs to be more explicit. Therefore the crosscurricular mathematics links made on the LTP are
being used in part but not to their full potential.
In theme books, there is one piece of work of crosscurricular mathematics from this term, which links
with history, and ordering ships on a timeline.
However, there was no learning intention given on
the sheet (and no date). More cross-curricular
opportunities need to be sought.
In Fig Class on display there is artwork with an
explicit cross-curricular mathematics link (showing
the different representations of a fraction). This is a
good example of cross-curricular mathematics, as the
mathematics link complements the art focus.
From Summer 2 Year 1 to Summer 1 Year 2, pupils
have made 7.5 2PS progress, which shows
accelerated progress across the year group. This has
been due to many actions, including specific small
group teacher-led intervention during the summer
term.
As evidenced through planning opportunities and
photographs, Year2 pupils are given many
opportunities to cook within DT, with focused links
within this to mathematics. Within the planning,
mathematics links are clearly identified, along with
the mathematics purpose (objective) being identified
within it. Eg, 1.6.12 pupils were cooking flapjack for
the Jubilee celebrations and on the plan it was
identified that the pupils needed more support with
scale reading, which was shown through recent APP
analysis.
Impact on Learning:
Due to some mathematical cross-curricular links being made across the broader curriculum, especially in Art and DT, pupils have been able to consolidate key APP-identified
mathematical skills. Pupils have had some opportunities to practise specific skills which have been identified as areas for improvement through APP, and this careful planning has
contributed to the good progress made by the pupils within this year group (7.5 points) over the course of the year.
Next Steps:
Immediate Action
Although the end of year results have been confirmed by the Year 2 SAT, this needs to be moderated in order to validate it. Therefore, teachers need to ensure that teacher
assessment is accurate and opportunities are given to pupils within lessons to confirm this learning through class and group discussion, and shown through their workbooks that they
are the level that they are recorded to be. To be reviewed by 9.7.12.
Medium Term (to inform next term SDP)
Teachers within Year 2 now need to maximise these cross-curricular opportunities, using the links made on the LTP in order to personalise, consolidate and apply mathematics
Drew Quayle© 2013
learning throughout all curriculum areas where it fits. To be reviewed 1.10.12. The Yew class teacher needs to ensure that pupils have as many cross-curricular mathematical learning
opportunities as the other year 2 class.
Teaching & Learning Report
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Heard it through the grapevine.
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John Hattie. Professor and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute, Australia.
His study on effects of achievement has analysed:
900+ meta analyses, 50,000 research studies, 240 million students.
Drew Quayle© 2013
Low
Medium
High
Retention (holding back a
year) (lowest)
Student control over
learning
Teacher subject matter
knowledge (foundation)
Gender (male compared
with female characteristics)
Ability grouping/tracking/
streaming
Matching teaching with
student learning styles
Within-class grouping
Individualising instruction
Using simulations and
gaming
Teacher expectations
Professional development
on student achievement
Home environment
Influence of peers
Phonics instruction
Providing worked examples
Direct instruction
Cooperative vs.
individualistic learning
Concept mapping
Comprehension
programmes
Vocabulary programmes
Acceleration (for example,
skipping a year)
Meta-cognitive strategy
programmes
Teacher – student
relationships
Reciprocal teaching
Feedback
Providing formative
evaluation to teachers
Teacher credibility in eyes
of the students
Student expectations
(highest)
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Don’t state the obvious.
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Inadequate
Requires Improvement
Good
Outstanding
October 2011
6%
76%
12%
Present
33%
49%
Drew Quayle© 2013
18%
6%
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www.teachersmedia.co.uk/series/uncut-classrooms
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Don’t reinvent the wheel.
Drew Quayle© 2013
Know thy impact
I see learning through the eyes of my students
Mind frames
• I am an evaluator/
activator
• I am a change agent
• I am a seeker of feedback
• I use dialogue more than
monologue
• I enjoy challenge
• I have high expectations
for all
• I welcome error
• I am passionate about
and promote the
language of learning
A cooperative and
critical planner
An adaptive learning
expert
A receiver of
feedback
• I use learning intentions
and success criteria
• I aim for surface and deep
outcomes
• I consider prior
achievement and
attitudes
• I set high expectation
targets
• I feed the gap in student
learning
• I create trusting
environments
• I know the power of peers
• I use multiple strategies
• I know when and how to
differentiate
• I foster deliberate practice
and concentration
• I know I can develop
confidence to succeed
• I know how to use the
three feedback questions
• I know how to use the
three feedback levels
(task, process, selfregulation)
• I give and receive
feedback
• I monitor and interpret
my learning/teaching
I help studentsDrew
to become
their own teachers
Quayle© 2013
Improving Learning Behaviours
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Key skill:
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YEAR 6
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Children need to learn/practise how to:
1. ENQUIRY • Be curious - can create a trail of thinking •
• Question - know not all questions can be answered
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• Communicate - use informal and formal language
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• Listen - read body language and understand hidden
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messages
2. PROBLEM SOLVING • Make links - create mind map •
to illustrate links and thinking
• Plan - know and use a range of learning skills
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• Sort fact from fiction
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• Reason - debate using logical arguments
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3. SOCIAL SKILLS • Be independent - identify own
learning needs
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• Collaborate - utilise others’ strengths for common •
good
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4. MANAGE FEELINGS • Manage their feelings •
express and appreciate a
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range of feelings and opinions
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5. EVALUATION • Reflect - use mind maps for target
setting
• Distil - understand bias
• Revise-know how to review links
6. MOTIVATION • Persevere - know when to give up
and try a
different way
• Manage distractions - be a good role model
7. SELF-AWARENESS • Be self-aware - know self-image
can limit learning
8. APPLY KNOWLEDGE • Understand and appreciate
lifelong learning
• Own opinions - confident to be different
• Apply knowledge - to solve scientific scenarios
9. CREATIVITY • Use imagination - paint pictures with
words
• Enthusiasm – channel enthusiasm using learning
muscles
• Be lateral thinkers - look for and articulate
alternative solutions to puzzles
10. EMPATHY • Empathise - aware of other cultures
and enriched
From Shirley Clarke.
Drew Quayle© 2013
Learning
assessment
Guided
group
Independent
learning
Teacher
input
TA guided
group
Independent
learning
Independent
learning
Independent
learning
Teacher
input
TA
observation
Guided
group
TA
observation
Independent
learning
Teacher
input
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Drew Quayle© 2013
Special Measures is the best
thing that can happen to you.
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Hit the ground running.