Mahmoud Abdelaal
English Instructor
Teacher Trainer
Intel Teach Senior Trainer
http://nata3alam.intel.com
Did you use any of these items ?
Do you think these devices will exist
after 50 years ?
What type of classroom did you have ?
Which one describes your classroom or school?
20th Century Classrooms
21st Century Classrooms
• Teacher-centered: teacher is
center of attention and provider
of information
• Student-centered: teacher is
facilitator/coach
• Time-based
• Outcome-based
• Focus: memorization of
discrete facts
• Focus: what students Know,
Can Do and Are Like after all
the details are forgotten.
• Textbook-driven
• Research-driven
• Passive learning
• Active Learning
• Learners work in isolation –
classroom within 4 walls
• Global Classroom
• Teacher is a judge. No one else
sees student work.
• Self, Peer and Other
assessments. Public audience,
authentic assessments.
Table was created by Anne Shaw, Founder and Director, 21st Century Schools,
www.21stCentury Schools.com
Key Trends in ELT Today
Teachers read journal,
participate in training, seminar
workshops, etc to update their
knowledge of trends &
techniques around the world
Presentation
Practice
Production
Imported
materials may not
be effective in
other countries
Updating
Future trend
Uncertain. Keep predicting
the future of existing trends
and a wave of change.
Teachers have not been
able to follow the
trends due to lack of
resources available to
them
PPP Lesson
Frustration
Locally
produced
materials
The focus in on how
learners can be made
proficient to communicate
to others who speak the
same TL
Communicativeness
Anti-method era
Sharing with a
colleague
No method is the
best for ELT. ELT
is now in ‘post
method thinking’
Teachers find a sollution to a
teaching problem, speak in
confidence about a failure,
get an idea how to teach
effectively
Key Trends in ELT Today
Teachers can enrich their
learning, not to depend
upon theories & methods
Not depending on a
particular method &
not conforming to
only one style,
Choosing from a wide
variety
Networking
Method
synergetics
or eclecticism
Grammaring
Grammar is seen as more
of a process than a
product. Grammar is is
conceived in its active &
progressive sense
Teachers have established
professional
organizations; seminars,
workshops, tarining, and
conventions
Conferencing
Discussing what the aims
of ELT should be. The
need of an approach to
language education that
aims at fostering a sense of
social responsibility in
students
Taking
responsibility for
self-direction to
improve students’
learning
effectiveness
Strategopedia
Teachers play the
role of facilitators in
the class. Students
learn by doing in
pairs & groups
Rethinking aim
Student centered
Reflective
Practice
Teachers learn to improve
their teaching by trying to
observe, understand,
reflect, learn, & tryout
something happening in
the class
Globalization and English
• English is the language of global communication
• According to the British Council:
▫ First language by 375 million
▫ Around 750 million speak English
as a foreign language
▫ 2/3 of world’s scientists read in
English
▫ 3/4 of world’s mail is in English
▫ 80% of world’s electronic data
is in English
English in the Workplace
• English is the main language of:
▫
▫
▫
▫
▫
▫
▫
Books and newspapers
Airports and air traffic control
International business
Academic conferences
Science and technology
Diplomacy
Sports and international
competitions
▫ Pop music
▫ Advertising
English in Education
• Increasing number of
students attending
universities abroad
• English increasingly
used as medium of
instruction
▫ Colleges and
universities becoming
English-medium
▫ Requires a very high
level of English
proficiency by both
students and
instructors
The Trickle-Down Effect
Greater need for advanced English
proficiency among students
Greater need for highly trained
and proficient English teachers at
all levels
Higher education requirements for
English teachers and greater
necessity for professional
development
The Trickle-Down Effect
The good news:
If you are highly proficient in
English, well-educated, and
up-to-date on current
methodology and theory, you
are IN HIGH DEMAND
The bad news:
This means work. Lots of
work.
The Paradigm Shift
“…We have a system of education that is modeled on the
interests of industrialism and in the image of it…Schools are still
pretty much organized on factory lines: ringing bells, separate
facilities, specialized into separate subjects…It’s essentially about
conformity and…I believe we’ve got to go in the exact opposite
direction.”
--Sir Ken Robinson, “Changing Education Paradigms”
Partnership for 21st Century Skills
In the Past
Today
Only teaching language
Using language as the vehicle
to teach academic content
Focus on isolated skills
(listening, speaking, reading,
writing)
Focus on three modes:
interpersonal, interpretive,
and presentational
Using the textbook as
curriculum
Use of thematic units and
authentic resources
Emphasis on teacher as
presenter/lecturer
Emphasis on learner as “doer”
and “creator”
Partnership for 21st Century Skills
In the Past
Today
Use of technology as a “cool
tool”
Integrating technology into
instruction to enhance
learning
Same instruction for all
students
Differentiating instruction to
meet individual needs
Confining language learning
to the classroom
Seeking opportunities for
learners to use language
beyond the classroom
Students “turn in” work only
for the teacher
Learners create to “share and
publish” to audiences more
than just the teacher
The New Education
• 360,985,492 Internet users worldwide as of June 30,
2012
▫ 34.3% of world population
▫ a 566.4% increase from 2000 (ITU)
• “Digital natives,” “digital immigrants,” and “digital
outcasts” (Prensky 2001)
It’s a Small World, After All
• Interconnectedness via globalization and technology
makes the world smaller
▫ THEN: Students had little experience with other
cultures or languages
▫ NOW: Familiarity with other cultures and languages is
expected and essential for upward mobility
• Beginning to see a leveling of the playing field
▫ Students outside of academic areas (anywhere with
Internet) now have access to information and culture
▫ Online courses becoming standard
▫ Youtube videos and MOOCs available to anyone
Online Classes Becoming the Norm
• Online course enrollment in the US at an alltime high
• Negative perceptions of online courses changing
The New Meaning of Technology
Technology of the Past:
Content based
Passive role of user
Stand-alone
Used by individuals
Behaviorist or
Connectivist
Pedagogy
Technology of the Future:
Collaboration based
Active role of user
Integrated
Used by groups
SocioConstructivist
Pedagogy
Don’t Panic, It’s a Good Thing…
Higher-level
cognition
Differentiated
instruction
Motivation
New
Paradigm
What Does This Mean?
#1: We are all materials developers.
• Constructing and
co-constructing textbooks
and materials
▫
▫
▫
▫
▫
Flip books
Online publishing
Class websites
Instructor blogs
LMS/CMS support
#2: Students are materials developers too.
• Students are active
participants in their
education
▫ Creating content for
classes
▫ Working in groups
with clear roles
▫ Publishing and sharing
classwork
#3: Print media isn’t enough.
• Incorporate a wide variety of multimedia
sources
▫
▫
▫
▫
▫
eBooks
Peer-to-peer file sharing
Audiovisual assignments
Google docs
Wikis
#4: We need new methods.
“Sage on the stage”
to
“Guide on the side”
Flipping the
Classroom
• Content is presented
outside the
classroom via
videos, readings,
and other materials
• Time in the
classroom is used
for application,
discussion and
collaboration, not
lecturing
Source: Center for Teaching & Learning, University
of Texas – Austin
https://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping_a_class/
what_is_flipped
Benefits of the Flipped Classroom
• Students can pause, rewind, rewatch videos or
audio files
• Instructors can incorporate more authentic
materials
• Works better with different learning styles
• Easier to make accommodations for students
• Builds working relationships between students
• Engages students in collaboration and reflection
#5: We have to innovate. A lot.
• Globalization and technology are changing our
perceptions of:
Culture
Happiness
Relationships
Language
Autonomy
#6: We can’t do it all ourselves.
• SHARE!
▫ Share new ideas and research
with colleagues
▫ Encourage colleagues to share
with one another
• Develop communities of practice
▫ Non-evaluative spaces to try out new
ideas
▫ Co-teaching, peer mentoring
• Allow yourself to learn
▫ Take classes (online classes are a
double help!)
▫ Attend conferences and webinars on
nata3alam and other CMSs.
▫ Open your mind to radical new
concepts
Thank you
nata3alam.intel.com
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Trends in ELT