Pygmalion:
Act V & the Postscript
Two Kinds of Transformation
And More …
Outline
• Act V
1. Two Transformations
2. Creator/Creature vs. Self-Made Woman
3. Eliza’s Relapses: Class Issues
4. Higgins and Eliza’s Battle of Will
• Postscript & Conclusion
1. Romance, Eliza’s decision & Higgins’
2. Consequences: Eliza’s and Freddy’s
marriage and families, their residence and
livelihood, their ‘education.’
3. Clara
Next Week
4. Summary
Housekeeping First
• 1) 11/27 5:00 pm costume and prop requests
• 2) 11/28 noon -- the tech. negotiation meeting.
• 3) 11/28 5:00 pm final version of your scripts, actor lists
and job lists
• 4) next Monday 12/1 12:15 - 1:30 Learning how to use
the control rooms (lighting and sound): Andrew will take
attendance at 12:15.
• 5) costumes and props --12/3 12:30 – 1:30 trying out
what you choose
• 6) 12/10 -- rehearsal 12:00 - 3:45 (sandwiches prepared)
I need one group volunteering to be the last.
• 6) 12/12 -- actual performance (the theatre will be open
for you at 8:00)(dumplings and potstickers as lunch)
Performances Today
11:00 – 12:00
SM & Crew: What did you do last week?
-- Write on the board.
11:00 – 11:10
Group 1 & 2
11:10 – 11:20
Group 3 & 4
11:20 – 11:30
Group 5 & 6
11:30 – 11:40
Group 7 & 8
11:40 – 11:50
Group 9 & 10
11:50 – 12:00
Group 11 & 12
ACT V-1 TWO KINDS OF
TRANSFORMATION
11/28 Class Discussion
Questions
On Act V & Postscript; Post your group responses before class
Group 5 & 6 . Mr. Doolittle (pp. 89-93): --what do you think
about his transformation? Is it funny? Ironical? What
does it say about Mr. Higgins and the issue of morality in
Victorian society?
• -- And about Mr. Doolittle? Do you agree with him that
taking the money and being intimidated by middle-class
morality is the only choice he has?
• 2) How is he a contrast to Eliza? (re. money, class
status and marriage)
Group 3 & 4 Eliza’s transformation: In what ways do
Higgins, Mrs. Pearce, Pickering and Mrs. Higgins
help Eliza get a better life?
–What does she achieve by herself?
11/28 Class Discussion
Questions
On Act V & Postscript; Post your group responses before class
Group 11 & 12. “The difference between a lady and a
flower girl is not how she behaves, but how's she's
treated.“ Do you agree?
1) Does Eliza have a “relapse” (to low-class manners)
when she sees her father? (99)
Group 9 & 10. Battle of Will] What do they each
insist on and see as goals of their lives in Act 5?
How do they change their tactics to win the debate?
1) [Higgins’ changes] Acts IV & V show Higgins
undergoing changes regarding his views of and
relation to Eliza. Where are the turning points and
are there traces of his affection for her?
Starting Questions (1)
1. Group 5 & 6 One of the Two Transformations
1) Mr. Doolittle (pp. 89-93): what do you think about
his transformation? Is it funny? Ironical? What
does it say about Mr. Higgins and the issue of
morality in Victorian society? And about Mr.
Doolittle? Do you agree with him that taking the
money and being intimidated by middle-class
morality is the only choice he has?
2) How is he a contrast to Eliza? (re. money, class
status and marriage)
2. Group 3 & 4 Eliza’s -- Creator/Creature vs. SelfMade Woman
1) In what ways do Higgins, Mrs. Pearce, Pickering
and Mrs. Higgins help Eliza get a better life? What
does she achieve by herself?
Starting Questions (1)
3. Group 11 & 12 Class
1) “The difference between a lady and a flower girl is
not how she behaves, but how's she's treated.“ Do
you agree?
2) Does Eliza have a “relapse” (to low-class manners)
when she sees her father? (99)
4. Higgins and Eliza
1) Acts IV & V show Higgins undergoing changes
regarding his views of and relation to Eliza. Where
are the turning points and are there traces of his
affection for her?
2) What do they each insist on and see as goals of
their lives? What do you think about the ending of
Act V? Would you be happy with it as the play’s
ending (without the sequel)?
1) Mr. Doolittle (pp. 89-93): --what do you think about his
transformation? Is it funny? Ironical? What does it say
about Mr. Higgins and the issue of morality in Victorian
society?
-- And about Mr. Doolittle? Do you agree with him that taking
the money and being intimidated by middle-class morality is
the only choice he has?
2) How is he a contrast to Eliza? (re. money, class status and
marriage)
1. TWO TRANSFORMATIONS
Higgins’ Role in Mr. Doolittle’s
Changes
1. the most original moralist at present in
England (“a silly joke”) Wannafeller
2. “Dustman! Oh no, sir: a gentleman.”
3. “Ruined me. Destroyed my happiness.
Tied me up and delivered me into the
hands of middle class morality” (91)
“you, Enry
Iggins”(90).
Mr. Doolittle’s Changes
•
His changes (pp. 89-93): tied to middleclass morality and
intimidated.
– [money] regular pension of 3 thousand a year on the
condition of giving 6 speeches a year for the Moral Reform
World League.
– [money] [seen as a benefactor of relatives and patient of
doctors] (92)
•
•
Used to "put the touch" on anyone for drinking money  Now
everyone (50 relatives) comes to him, demanding favors and
monetary support.
Used to be shoved around (or “shut of”擺脫) by doctors and solicitors
 Now the center of their attention.
– [language] “'Ill have to learn to speak middle class
language from you, instead of speaking proper English.
That’s where you’ll come in; and I daresay that’s what you
done it for.' ”
– [marriage] Has to get married. (100)
Mr. Doolittle’s Changes (2):
Related Issues
A. “Creator” Henry Higgins’ is not careful about the
changes he may bring to others;
B. Mr. Doolittle’s Education? Not really.
1. No choice: given the choice between “the Skilly of the
workhouse and the Char Bydis of the middle class” (“Scylla and
Charybdis” an Italian rock and a whirlpool nearby) Money is still
attractive for him as an “undeserving poor,” since going to “the
workhouse” (老年貧民收容所) is the only alternative.
2. Money – still selfish
–
Creates a sense of burden, too. (expected to be ‘respectable’
and to support others.)
–
Cares about Eliza only in terms of middle class morality(95);
does not want to support her.
C. Social Morality: superficial, promoted through making
speeches?
Mr. Doolittle vs. Eliza—both “dis-classed”
Father
Daughter
1. Through a “silly joke” of
Higgins
2. Gain 3000 pounds a year.
1. 'Enry Iggins‘90,95
2. With a lot of money, tied to
middleclass morality; sought
after; refuses to take care of his
daughter.
3. intimidated and cannot choose.‘
4. [sequel] extremely popular in
the smartest society‘—upper
class
1. self-motivated + H & P’s
bet
2. goes for education (accent,
manners and mind—more
later).
1. “Aa-ooo” when seeing her
father. (99) 'Enry Iggins‘ (108)
2. Has no money.
3. Improved her accent, language,
culture & mind;
4. Needs respect and tenderess
5. [sequel] chooses to work and
be independent.—middle
class
In what ways do Higgins, Mrs. Pearce, Pickering
and Mrs. Higgins help Eliza get a better life?
What does she achieve by herself?
ACT V-2. CREATOR/CREATURE VS.
SELF-MADE WOMAN
From Romance to Social Realism
Whether as Pygmalion story or that of “self-made woman,” Eliza’s
story cannot be a complete success
Creators, Helpers and “Creatures”
•
•
“Creator” Higgins  Mr. D and Eliza, careless
about the other consequences
Helpers???
Pickering
Yes: in her self-respect (courteous manners, preventing sexual
exploitation)
-- [sequel] offers financial support
No: -- gets carried away by experiment and then its success;
-- not know what to do but calling the police;
-- suspects E of buying D clothes;
-- does not understand E; asks Eliza back, but on Higgins’ side
Mrs.
Pearce
Yes: –in manners (language, table manners and dressing) 
No: -- limited (glad to get help; can only say “You don’t think
sir.”)
Mrs.
Higgins
Yes: –In speaking for Eliza (Act III & V) and offering a space for
negotiation. (94-96)
No: -- the last ambiguous remark “I'm afraid you’ve spoiled
that girl, Henry.”
Eliza’s Self-Transformation
1.
2.
3.
4.
Asserting herself;
Fighting back in their battle of wills
[sequel] Making a wise choice of “the weak”;
[sequel] Continuous self-improvement
through going to classes
But – [sequel]
a. She still needs financial support;
b. She is still attracted to Higgins
c. She is limited in receiving education.
.
1) “The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not
how she behaves, but how's she's treated.“ Do you
agree?
2) Does Eliza have a “relapse” (to low-class manners)
when she sees her father? (99)
V-3. CLASS ISSUES
4-1. “The difference between a lady and
a flower girl is not how she behaves, but
how's she's treated.“
Yes and No.
Yes – One’s social identity is relational. We
cannot insists on a certain identity unless we
are recognized as such by others, or through
some rituals.
No – Since social identity is relational, we need
to produce signs and send out messages
expressive of this identity.
Eliza’s Relapse?
A. Eliza
– When seeing her father: a natural response,
which shows that one cannot forget one’s
mother tongue completely.
– (p. 108) “Enry Iggins” – used consciously as
a means of getting even or fighting back.
• Mr. Dolittle:
– The father: “Enry Iggins” (90, 95) -- just a sign
of anger.
1) [Battle of Will] What do they each insist on and see as
goals of their lives? How do they change their tactics to win
the debate?
2) [Higgins’ changes] Acts IV & V show Higgins undergoing
changes regarding his views of and relation to Eliza. Where
are the turning points and are there traces of his affection
for her?
3) [Ending] What do you think about the ending of Act V?
Would you be happy with it as the play’s ending (without
the sequel)?
V-4. HIGGINS AND ELIZA’S
BATTLE OF WILL
First Battle in Act II
Higgins
•
•
•
•
Eliza
• Taking the initiative
• Confused and
Shocked
• Staying despite her
wanting to leave
Not interested
Tempted by the bet
All excited
Persuasive
2nd Battle in Act IV
Eliza
• Angry about being
ignored
• Worried about the
future
• Wins back a bit by
making separation of
the property.
Higgins
•
•
•
•
Surprised and uneasy
Dismissive
Offers solutions
Angered
Their Battle of Wills in Act V
Higgins
Eliza
0. (96) – As possessive as a god;
(97) – Does not trust Eliza’s improvement
(‘relapse’)
1. “real education” (97-98) cares about
manners, proper language and respect;
[Asks her to go back. ]
3. (after the interruption of Doolittle)
[equality 1] (102)
The same manner to everyone
2. [terms?] [usage as a maid] (102)
5. [Independence/arrogance] Can do
without anyone.
[with humility] I shall miss you.
4. [attention & equal treatment](103)
Will not be ‘passed over.’ Wants a sense
of importance and respect.
6. [equality 2] care for humanity, refutes
Eliza’s plea as commercialism; Offers
fellowship and to adopt her,
but refuses to change.
"By George, Eliza, I said I'd make a woman of
you; and I have"
9 (the life of the gutter vs. the life of a
scientist and lady)
[recognition ad equality 3]Amazed at
Eliza’s improvement in the mind. “Three
old bachelors together.”
7. [kindness] Eliza (104-05) Complains
about the trouble he causes, not being
‘noticed.’ Still wants “a little kindness.”
-- (106) Thinks of Freddy as a solution.
Be natural, be friendly.
8. [Independence]
 marry Freddy
 [strike back] Threatens to assist the
Hungarian or to use the knowledge he
teaches her.
Summary: Higgins and Eliza’s
Differences
• turning points
– Act IV:
• 1) After E throws slippers at his face, H gets to understand
Eliza’s concern;
• 2) H -- angered when Eliza separates her possession from his
and returns him the ring;
– Act V:
• 1) H -- nervous upon finding her gone (still sees her as
something from “the mud”;
• 2) H –[offers] equal manners; offers good fellowship;
• 4) E –[wants] tenderness & attention
• 5) E –[fights back] marriage to Freddy; her livelihood as a
phonetics teacher or assistant to N.
• Higgins – unwilling to marry, to change his (lack of)
manners or his treatment of Eliza as a housekeeper.
Higgins and Eliza: Traces of Their
Mutual Affection
• (IV) never thought of her
leaving; angered
• Higgins’ nervousness (“in
a state”) when finding
Eliza gone.
• To Doolittle: “Have you
found Eliza? (91)
• Gets angry at the thought
of Dolittle’s getting her
back (93)
• [the moment he sees her]: “Get
up and come home; and
dont be a fool. ” (96)
• Eliza’s –
• (103)“I know you did[know
she could leave], you brute.
You wanted to get rid of
me. ”
• Her pleas for
“kindness.”(105)
• (109) As she is leaving Mrs.
Higgins' house, she still
offers advice “disdainfully”
to Higgins' about his gloves,
ties, cheese, and calls to
remind Mrs. Pearce about
the ham.
Eliza’s and Higgins’ ambiguous expressions
(103) LIZA. I dont care how you treat me. I dont mind your swearing at me.
I dont mind a black eye: Ive had one before this. But [standing up and
facing him] I wont be passed over.
HIGGINS Then get out of my way; for I won't stop for you. You talk about
me as if I were a motor bus.
LIZA So you are a motor bus: all bounce and go, and no consideration for
anyone. But I can do without you: Don't think I can't.
HIGGINS I know you can. I told you you could.
LIZA. You wanted to get rid of me.
HIGGINS Liar
LIZA. Thank you.
HIGGINS. You never asked yourself, I suppose, whether I could do
without you. [She sits down with dignity.]
LIZA [earnestly] Don't you try to get round me. You'll HAVE to do without
me.
HIGGINS [arrogant] I can do without anybody…
Eliza: beating about the bushes, or striving for a
kind of equality she cannot get from Higgins?
HIGGINS … Making life means making trouble.
LIZA I'm no preacher: I don't notice things like that. I notice that you don't
notice me.
HIGGINS [jumping up and walking about intolerantly] Eliza: You‘re an idiot. I
waste the treasures of my Miltonic mind by spreading them before you. …So
you can come back or go to the devil: Which you please.
LIZA What am I to come back for?
HIGGINS [bouncing up on his knees on the ottoman and leaning over it to her]
For the fun of it. That's why I took you on.
LIZA [with averted face] And you may throw me out tomorrow if I don't do everything you want
me to?
HIGGINS Yes; and you may walk out tomorrow if I don't do everything YOU want me to.
LIZA And live with my stepmother?
Equality?
HIGGINS Yes, or sell flowers.
LIZA Oh! if I only COULD go back to my flower basket!  Freddy
…
That's just
how I feel.
LIZA [much troubled] I want a little kindness.
Ambiguities in
their Relationship (2)
• Higgins:
1. Cannot live without her; shocked whenever E
mentions separation and marriage; does try to get
her back.
2. (103) Recognizes her values; “I cant turn your soul
on. Leave me those feelings; and you can take away
the voice and the face. They are not you. ”
3. Changes (from seeing her as a guttersnipe to an
intellectual equal).
4. Other signs: the ring, his efforts on her and
“spreading his mind” before her.
Pickering! Nonsense: she's going to marry Freddy. Ha ha! Freddy!
Freddy!! Ha ha ha ha ha!! ! !! [He roars with laughter as the
play ends]. ...
Are there chances
for their getting married
at the end of Act V?
No, unless
• Higgins is willing to change himself and be
loving, or
• Eliza is willing to stay unmarried and inferior
to him.
More to discuss after you’ve read the sequel.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Eliza’s Education vs. Mr. Dolittle’s
Transformation
The Themes of Pygmalion vs. Self-Made
Woman
Class Relations: The use of coarse language as
relapse or strategy
The battle of will between Higgins and Eliza
Pygmalion
the Sequel and
Conclusion
11/28 Class Discussion
Questions
On Act V & Postscript; Post your group responses before class
Group 1 & 2 The Ending -- What do you think about the
ending of Act 5? Is it possible for Eliza and Higgins to
get married?
Compare this ending with the endings
-- suggested by the Postscript
-- of the film versions of Pygmalion (1938 and 1973 BBC
version) and My Fair Lady?
Group 7 & 8 In what ways does the Sequel ‘revise’
Pygmalion as a romance? Or deny that it is a romance? -What are the reasons added here against Eliza’s staying
with Higgins as a soul mate?
-- Why does it also introduce the changes of Clara?
The Sequel
Romance, Eliza’s decision & Higgins’
Consequences: Eliza’s and Freddy’s
marriage and families, their residence
and livelihood, their ‘education.’
3. Clara
 Do you agree with Shaw?
1.
2.
1-1. Conventions of Romance
Denied
• 1. Our imaginations have been enfeebled by “their
dependence on the ready-mades and reach-me-downs
(made for nobody in particular) of the ragshop in which
Romance keeps its stock of "happy endings" to misfit all
stories.
• 2. Eliza’s transformation: Not an uncommon story.
• 3. Does the hero have to marry the heroine? (Do the
married couple live happily ever after?)
• 4. Eliza and Freddy’s marriage and their shop.
1-2. Factors in Eliza’s Decision
1.
Eliza’s Status:
•
(111) Her decision depends on “whether she is really
free to choose.” She is, since she is young and
pretty.
• “Eliza's instinct tells her not to marry Higgins. It
does not tell her to give him up.” What does this
mean?
2. Higgins:
a. His love of his Mother
– Typical of an “imaginative boy” with an intelligent
and graceful mother. (112)
 Leads to “a disengagement of his affections, his sense
of beauty, and his idealism from his specifically
sexual impulses ”
b. His interest in Milton and the Universal Alphabet (113)
1-2. Factors in Eliza’s Decision
2. Higgins’ – 113
c. her resentment of Higgins's domineering superiority,
d. her mistrust of his coaxing cleverness in getting
round her and evading her wrath when he had gone
too far with his impetuous bullying.
(113) Eliza and Freddy
•
•
He is a gentleman;
He is weak, thus attracted to Eliza as a strong
woman.
(conclusion 115: “Will she look forward to a lifetime
of fetching Higgins's slippers or to a lifetime of
Freddy fetching hers? […] Unless Freddy is
biologically repulsive to her [. . .]”)
* Do you agree with Eliza’s or with Shaw’s reasons?
Do you want to marry one that is
weaker than you, or stronger? (ref. p. 114)
• When a lion meets another with a louder
roar "the first lion thinks the last a bore."
The man or woman who feels strong
enough for two, seeks for every other
quality in a partner than strength.
• weak people want to marry strong people
who do not frighten them too much; and
this often leads them to make the mistake
we describe metaphorically as "biting off
more than they can chew."
1-2. Factors in Eliza’s Decision
Kate’s personal views:
Agree-- “strength” not the most important factor
1. There is a lot to consider in choosing one’s spouse.
(Besides love, pattern of relationship, status, sexual
attraction, money, one’s age and the choices available.)
2. Eliza should not stay with one who is domineering and
refusing to change.
Disagree –
1. Does the strong one really want to marry a weak one?
Or maybe there is attraction of two who are congenial
to but different from each other.
2. Why are there just these two choices for Eliza?
Couldn’t she work and wait a bit? (But at that time
staying single “may not be” a choice for her.)
3. Why is there only description of Eliza’s secret affection
for Higgins (124), but not the other way around?
Higgins’ “Secret” Affection
• For his mother? (Oedipal attachment to
his mother)
• For Pickering?
• There is no absolute difference between
homosexuality and homosociality esp. at a
time when sex was a taboo.
2. Consequences
• Money:
– Freddy – no money, no job.
– Doolittle – not willing to offer support.
– Honeymoon would have been penniless without P’s
support
– Uses the gift of 500 pounds for a long time; keeps
getting supported by the two bachelors
• Residence
– Considers living with the two bachelors
• Occupation
– Opens a flower shop with the support of Pickering.
(117)
– Finally earning money.
• Education (122) (to write, shorthands and polytechnic (工藝)
class
– Not really helpful.
Eliza’s Relation with Higgins
after her marriage
• Still lives in Wimpole Street; still nagging;
• Still jealous of other women;
• Cannot become a professional
phonetician (no right to meddle with “his”
knowledge.
• her secret wish to be alone on a "desert
island" with Higgins to seduce him.
3. Clara
• 1. changed under the influence of Eliza’s
transformation, H. G. Wells and the
novelist Galsworthy to realize the vanity
and unimportance of her class;
• 2. works at a furniture store.
4. Conclusion
1.
2.
Pygmalion & Romance
Comedy of Manners -- Language and the Other Social
Markers//Appearance vs. Reality
1.
2.
3.
3.
Class Differences & Social Mobility
1.
2.
3.
4.
Manners: Pronunciation, Handwriting, Dress, manners, interest,
Marriage and Family
Morality – Class-bound? Prudery made fun of.
The ways upper class is presented – useless or fashionable
The background Shaw offers (in Act I and the Sequel) –of social
climbing
Eliza’s, Doolittle’s and Clara’s different kinds of changes
Scientific Creation, Education & Human Concern
1.
2.
3.
Professionalism (with Ideals) Higgins vs. Nepommuck
The Roles of Money
Respect for others
Conclusion (2)
5. Other Possible Readings: (For your reference ONLY)
-- Higgins as one suffering from Asperger’s syndrome (a kind of
autism) (Weintraub)
--Aspergen “has difficulties in social interaction, lacks empathy, or has
difficulties with it, has trouble with social role-taking and has
unusual responses to the environment similar to those in autism.”
--can achieve success in some specialized academic subjects.
E.g. computer programmers, dentists, scientists.
-- examples
–
–
–
of Higgins’ insensitivity to Eliza’s feelings Act II;
of his rude social behavior, lack of manners Acts I & III
of his exclusive interest in languages and accents
Do you agree?
Class –
-- Eliza: “The difference between a lady and a flower girl is not
how she behaves, but how's she's treated.”
-- Higgins: “The great secret, Eliza, is not having bad manners or
good manners or any other particular sort of manners, but
having the same manner for all human souls: in short,
behaving as if you were in Heaven, where there are no
third-class carriages, and one soul is as good as another.”
(1236) --generalization
Manners:
-- “[People’s saying] [w]hat they think they ought to think is bad
enough, Lord knows; but what they really think would break
up the whole show. [. . . ] We are all savages . . . (Act 3)
Life:
-- “What is life but a series of inspired follies?” (Act 2) –rhetorical
questions
-- “If you cant appreciate what you’ve got, youd better get what
you can appreciate.” (Act 5) – sententia (使用警句,格言
see Notes)
Notes –Act V: Rhetoric
•
•
•
•
(ref. http://www.virtualsalt.com/rhetoric.htm)
Pickering: this chap has a certain natural gift of
rhetoric. Observe the rhythm of his native
woodnotes wild. "I'm willing to tell you: I'm wanting
to tell you: I'm waiting to tell you." Sentimental
rhetoric!
[figurative language] metaphor, personification;
oxymoron
[others] repetition; parallelism (Several parts of a
sentence or several sentences are expressed similarly
to show that the ideas in the parts or sentences are
equal in importance.)
reverse parallelism; “He labors without
complaining and without bragging rests.” (He
labors without complaining and rests without bragging.)
Notes –Act V: Rhetoric (2)
• sententia (quoting a maxim or wise saying to
apply a general truth to the situation;
concluding or summing foregoing material by
offering a single, pithy statement of general
wisdom) e.g. “But, of course, to
understand all is to forgive all.”
• Oxymoron – Eliza: deliciously low
Notes –Sequel
• H. G. Wells (who influences Clara) – a socialist and Utopia
novelist (work: The Time Machine)
– “Passionate concern for society led Wells to join the socialist
Fabian Society in London, but he soon quarreled with the
society's leaders, among them George Bernard Shaw.”
• Kew Gardens (p. 122 “Combination of London School and Kew
Gardens”) -- the Royal Botanic Gardens
• Nell Gwynne: (1650-1687)
-- who originally sold oranges in the precincts of the Drury Lane
Theatre;
-- became an actress at the age of only fifteen;
-- became the mistress of King Charles II,
from 1670 until his death, and
thus popular to the public.
Next Week
• Poetry I: Lyric and Tone
[Reading and Paraphrase]
Group 1-2: W. Carlos Williams “This is just to say” (p. 797);
Group 3-4: Chasin, Helen “The Word Plum” (p. 828)
Group 5-6: Brooks, Gwendolyn “We Real Cool” (p 720)*
Group 7-8: Hayden, Robert “Those Winter Sundays” (p
783)*
Group 9-10: Frost, Robert “Stopping by Woods…”
(p1091)*
Group 11-12: Dickinson, Emily “I’m Nobody! Who Are
You?”*
Your Choices
•
•
•
•
Group 5 & 6: Act 1
Group 11&12: Act 2
Group 3 & 4: Act 3
Group 9 & 10: Act 3 (At-Home
Party)
• Group 7 & 8: Act 4
• Group 1 & 2: Act 5
Mini Play Contest: Tentative
Schedule
10月31日
11月7日
11月14日
11月21日
11月28日
12月5日
12月12日
Play
General Introd
Group
Job Division
Character Analysis &
Act I and Act II. (pp. 11-37)
Theme
Line Reading &
Act II & III (pp. 38-71)
Creative Adaptation
(script 1st draft ready)
Act III-IV (pp. 71-87 + Act Performance &
V)
Set and Prop
Theme and Overall
Act V and Postscript
Presentation
Rehearsal 12/10
Mini Play Preparation
Poetry I: Lyric and Tone
Performance Day
(12:15-3:30)
Reference
•
Weintraub, Rodelle. “Bernard Shaw's Henry Higgins: a classic
aspergen. ”English Literature in Transition 1880-1920, Fall 2006
v49 i4 p388-98)
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Pygmalion Act V