Welcome to . . .
Perspectives on International
Co-op/Internship Programs:
A Panel Discussion
CED Session 363
Presenters
Ken Little, Georgia Tech
Mary Kordys, Siemens
Gayle Elliott, Univ. of Cincinnati
Karl Zimmer, General Cable
Game Plan
Why?
How?
What Next?
Why offer int’l co-op/internships?
Benefits
For
Students
For
Industry
For
Schools
For
Profession
Benefits for Students
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Prepare for global economy
Master a foreign language
Enhance employability upon graduation
Gain vital cross-cultural exposure
Improve communication skills
Grow personally and socially
Expand engineering skills and ability to
practice discipline in other cultures
Benefits for Industry
•
•
•
•
•
Attract highly-motivated students
Establish ties with key universities
Gain employees with global perspective
Gain employees with language skills
Develop future leaders for your company
Benefits for Universities
• Gain world-wide visibility
• Increase the flow of technology between
the institution and industry
• Foster students’ critical thinking skills
• Offer a value-added education to attract
best students
• Meet ABET requirements
Work Abroad Programs Upgrade
Entire Engineering Profession
Resulting in . . .
• Flexible, adaptable workforce that can
respond to other cultures’ methods of
analyses and problem-solving
• Engineers who understand global context
of economics/international commerce
• Engineers who better understand global
health, environmental, and security issues
How?
• Models to emulate
• Tips for success
What next?
• Future goals
• Research needed
Georgia Tech Degree Designators
Cooperative Plan
International Plan
• Georgia Tech was established in 1885 with a
dedication to hands-on, experiential education.
• The cooperative education program, in existence
at Tech since 1912, is recognized as an academic
program that helps the institute produce
graduates who will “have an impact.”
• Thus, until 2005, “Cooperative Plan” was the only
degree designator Georgia Tech would add to a
graduate’s diploma.
• Newly approved “International Degree Plan”
International Plan
• Strategic vision is to “define the technological
research university of the 21st century and
educate the leaders of a technologically driven
world.”
• Focus on developing globally-minded graduates
• Goal: Increase % of undergraduates with
international experience from 35% to 50% by 2010
• Offer new “International Plan”
Georgia Tech’s International Plan: Three
components
• Four required courses
– Before international experience: 1. Global
economics, 2. international relations, 3. course about
specific country/region
– 4. Culminating or capstone course in final year tying
international experience to student’s discipline
• Language Proficiency – based on test rather
than coursework
• International Experience – 2 terms, not less than
26 weeks, of study abroad, co-op/internship, or
research. Any two of these three.
International Plan: How is it unique?
• University-wide template for the plan – general
requirements consistent across all disciplines
• Tailored to each discipline (courses, location and
nature of overseas experiences; capstone
course/ final year design course)
• A degree-long program that is integrated into the
student’s plan of study
• Students receive a designator on their diploma
(e.g., B.S. in Electrical Engineering: International
Plan)
International Co-op at Georgia Tech
• One or more of four required work
terms set outside U.S.
• Georgia Tech co-ops’ work abroad
counts toward International Degree
Program
• Co-ops completing Co-op AND
International requirements receive
both designators on degree
Typical International Co-op Schedule
at Georgia Tech
• Students complete first year in school
• Students begin/continue studying foreign
language during school terms
• Students work first 3 co-op assignments in
the USA
• Test determines level of language fluency
• Work final 2 co-op assignments back-to-back
at non U.S. location; length > 6 months
International Co-op/Modern Languages
Program - Typical Alternation Schedule:
Co-ops work three semesters in USA while learning 2nd language. Study abroad
one semester using 2nd language. Remain abroad working back-to-back semesters
in major field. Finish degree requirements at Georgia Tech.
Year
1
2
F a ll
A c a d e m ic A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
S tu d ie s
S e m e s te r
S p rin g
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
S e m e s te r
Sum m er
S e m e s te r
O p tio n a l
W o rk
T e rm
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
3
W o rk
T e rm
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
W o rk
T e rm
4
S tu d y
A b ro a d
In t e r n a t io n a l
W o rk T erm
In t e r n a t io n a l
W o rk T erm
5
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
International Models Used
• Work exchange placements
with partner universities
• Academic/work exchanges
with partner universities
• Home country placements
• Branch location placements
• Students find own job
• Consortium placements
Role of Work Abroad Advisor
• Works with employers and partners to develop
work abroad opportunities
• Reviews resume and advises for international
resume/CV format
• Guides interns and co-ops through work visa
process
• Confirms registration in int’l co-op or internship
course
• Monitors work performance and academic
progress throughout international work experience
The Right Student for an International
Assignment Must BE:
• A close match to the job
requirements
• A good ambassador, open to
new cultures
• Flexible, adaptable, selfreliant, and motivated
• Outgoing, mature, reliable, and
independent
The Right Student for an International
Assignment Must HAVE:
• Third or fourth year academic standing
& high g.p.a.
• Relevant technical skills; prior work
experience helpful, especially when with
the same employer
• Host country language
• Good communication and social skills
• Enthusiasm for and commitment to the
goals of an international education
Top Three Tips for Universities:
• Develop relationships with multinational
companies that can use co-ops in domestic
assignments before sending them to a branch in
another country.
• Determine locations your students desire to
work internationally and assess them for
employability of your students. If compatible,
seek partnership with a similar university in that
country to set up work exchanges or
academic/work exchanges.
• Establish clear criteria for student selection and
develop a structure of support to prepare
students prior to their international assignments.
Top Three Tips for Employers:
• Hire students as domestic co-ops and
identify specific expectations to be
considered for international assignments on
later work terms
• Hire international students to work in the US
as co-ops, then send them to your facilities in
their home country.
• Identify a reliable employee in the host
country who can serve as the student contact
person.
Contact: Debbie Gulick
International Practicum Coordinator
Division of Professional Practice
The Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, GA 30332-0260
Phone: +404-385-7344
Fax: +404-385-4147
[email protected]
www.profpractice.gatech.edu
Recommended Approaches for
Developing an International
Intern/Co-opBusiness
Program
Process Support - CF
Agenda
Siemens Facts/Figures
Employer Perspective: Why participate in formal co-op programs
Formal Co-op Program Elements
Brief Overview of International Co-op/Intern Programs
 GA Tech/TUM Model
 Purdue’s GEARE Program
Measures of Success
Top three tips for Universities
Top three tips for Employers
What’s next
A Global Powerhouse
Siemens AG: Worldwide figures for fiscal 20051 (U.S. GAAP)2

Global Player in 190 Countries

Employs 460,000 people

Sales: $96 billion; profit $5.9 billion




Infrastructure Company
Medical, Transportation, Communications,
Power Generation, Lighting, Automotive,
Building Technologies, Water Filtration,
Automation

Research and
Development: $6.6 billion
Dedicates more than 47,000 employees to global
R&D
Derives 75% of total sales from products and
services developed in the last five years
1Fiscal
Year October 1 – September 30
A World Leader in Electrical Engineering
and Electronics
Siemens AG: Comparing the top ten in fiscal 2004
$144.6
€ 119.0
Total sales (in billions)*
$94.5
€ 77.8
$89.8
€73.9
Sales in Electrical Engineering & Electronics –
Solutions & Services
(in billions)*
$91.3
€ 75.2
$81.9
€ 67.4
$82.3
€67.7
*Average annual exchange rate for FY 2004: €1.00 =$1.215
$79.7
€ 65.6
$77.4
€63.7
$59.8
€49.2
$74.8
€ 61.6
$71.1
€58.5
$67.9
€ 55.9
$53.0
€43.6
$66.2
€ 54.5
$59.5
€49.0
$37.5
€30.9
GE
IBM
Siemens
Hitachi
HewlettPackard
Matsushita
Sony
Samsung
Electronics
$52.7
€ 43.4
$47.5
€39.1
$47.1
€ 38.8
$47.1
€38.8
Toshiba
Dell
The USA is Siemens' Second Largest Market
Siemens in the USA: Key statistics for fiscal 2005 (U.S. GAAP)
•
Sales $18.8 billion*
•
Orders $20.8 billion*
•
U.S. sales account for
20 percent of worldwide sales
•
70,000 employees in all 50 states
•
6,945 employees and $900
million dedicated to R&D
•
11,000 U.S. patents**
•
Some $3 billion invested in U.S.
acquisitions in the past year
. * Sales/Orders by U.S. Operating Companies exclusive of transactions with affiliated companies
** As of 11-30-05.
Major Production Locations Around the World*
C.I.S.
North
America
Europe
AsiaPacific
Middle East
Africa
South
America
96
72
61
44
14
North
America
Germany
Europe excl.
Germany
AsiaPacific
South
America
4
Middle East,
Africa, C.I.S.
*Production locations grouped by economic region
Historical Perspective
Decentralized recruiting strategy – every operating company acted independently
Relied heavily on traditional college recruiting strategy - successfully managing
Campus Development Programs
Full-time entry-level rotational leadership development programs
Very expensive to organization (approx $100K per trainee per year)
Overall successful in meeting hiring goals, but lacked alternative strategic approach
for building technical talent pipeline within Siemens
Reactive approach vs. proactive approach
College recruiting focused on meeting domestic business needs as opposed to global
business needs
Domestically driven; lacked international focus
Lacked comprehensive strategy in building talent pipeline
Interns/Co-ops viewed as supplemental labor as opposed to technical pipeline of talent
Domestic and international intern programs not linked
Limited diversity initiatives to grow minority talent pipeline
Recruiting strategy limited in attracting entry-level talent that is culturally and
internationally prepared for a global workplace
Why Have a Formal Co-op Program?
Key Advantages/Benefits:
 Strategic initiative to build technical pipeline for the future:
 Campus Development Program and/or Direct Hire openings
 Provides entry-level talent that is culturally, linguistically and technically
prepared to work for a global company
 Students gain valuable experience in field of study/industry
 Students receive academic credit
 Cost effective program for company
 Allows managers to ‘shop’ before they ‘buy’ candidates
 Students become ambassadors/recruiters for company
 Reduces need for formal campus recruiting activities
 Allows employer to continue strengthening relationships with key core Siemens
schools
 Concept works with all disciplines/functions (not just engineering)
 Can integrate an international component into concept (work & study abroad)
Formal Co-op Program Elements
(The How)
Selection Criteria
Student must be full-time undergrad
student; minimum GPA 3.0
Targeting Sophomores/Juniors
Student must be enrolled as full-time co-op
student to receive school credit
Must possess following competencies:
leadership, strong communication skills;
internationally oriented; strong work ethic,
strong PC skills and second language ability
Rotational Assignments
Divisional participation
Six months in length (best practice)
(example: June through December or
January through June)
Requires student to work through entire semester
as opposed to taking coursework
Flexible based on student’s availability (ie work
Jan-May) to be able to take summer school
Program Funding
Central Services H.R.
Campus recruiting costs
Hiring Manager
Hourly wages
Housing Subsidy/Relocation
Travel (if required)
Training (if required)
Administrative Program Elements
College Recruiting to coordinate “front end” of
college recruiting: campus interviews/offers/new
hire administration/relocation/housing.
Program owned by divisions (headcount)
Hiring Manager/H.R. to provide mentors /
training / leadership development offerings /
networking activities
International Co-op/Modern Languages Program
Example of Established Concept with GA Tech/TUM
• Co-ops work one or two terms in USA while learning 2nd language.
• Study abroad one semester using 2nd language.
• Remain abroad working back-to-back semesters in major field.
• Finish degree requirements at GA Tech.
Year
F a ll
S e m e s te r
S p rin g
S e m e s te r
Sum m er
S e m e s te r
1
2
3
4
5
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
S tu d y
A b ro a d a t
T U -M u n ic h
(E x ch a n g e
S tu d e n t)
In te rn a tio n a l
W o rk T e rm a t
S ie m e n s
G e rm a n y
W o rk T e rm
a t S ie m e n s
USA
(o p tio n a l)
W o rk T e rm
a t S ie m e n s
USA
G e rm a n
3 m o n th
Sum m er
C la ss (T U M )
In te rn a tio n a l
W o rk T e rm a t
S ie m e n s
G e rm a n y
A c a d e m ic
S tu d ie s
LBAT (Language for Business & Technology) Program
» German 3691 – Business
Communication
» German 3692 – German
Business Culture
» German 3693 – German
Science & Technology
LBAT Excursions
GEARE; Purdue, TH Karlsruhe Model
Global Engineering Alliance for Research and Education
Sophomore
Junior
Senior
JanFebMarAprMayJun Jul AugSepOct NovDecJanFebMarAprMayJun Jul AugSepOctNovDecJanFebMarAprMayJun Jul AugSepOct NovDec
Purdue
GEARE
Karlsruhe
GEARE
Purdue -
Karlsruhe Germany Design Team
Internship
Orientation
Proj. #1
Candidate US Courses +
Selection Internship
Purdue
Purdue Design Team
Proj. #2
Karlsruhe - Germ. Karlsruhe - Vordip
Purdue US Candidate
Courses + Intern- Design .Exam
Design Team
Selection
Internship
Orientation ship Team Prj.#1 s
Proj. #2
Note: Karlsruhe students will miss first couple of weeks of summer semester to finish the spring semester at Purdue.
Additional Features:
Revenue- and graduation-time neutral for participating students
1st semester at Karlsruhe, 2nd semester at Purdue
Work in small teams of Karlsruhe and Purdue Students, e.g.. 2 + 2 or 3 + 2
Industry-inspired projects
Design phase at Karlsruhe (April through July)
Prototype construction phase at Purdue (January through April)
Measures of IEP Success
Universities:
Competitive edge for attracting freshmen for top engineering and business
schools
Develop ‘worldly’ talent
Growth in program size/language students
Industry:
Reduce costly college recruiting expenses
Allows for development of technical talent pipelines
Accelerated assimilation rates for entry-level grads
Joint grant writing
Long-Term Relationships
With Corporate and Academic Partners
With Graduates
Corporate Hires
Top Three Tips for Universities
Establish and develop relationships with multi-national, global organizations in the U.S.
and abroad.
Establish personal relationship with University Relations Manager to understand their
business needs so that the proper candidates can be identified for them.
Prepare students both linguistically and culturally for their experience abroad. It is not
enough for the students just to have language ability; they must learn about cultural
differences to be successful in a foreign market.
Market international exchange programs to Freshman so that they can properly prepare to
participate in an international exchange program. Students must be aware that these
programs will typically push out their graduation at least one year from a typical
bachelor’s degree.
Top Three Tips for Employers
Develop relationships with universities that have established and proven international
exchange programs that include components of foreign language study in addition to a
major area of study such as engineering or business.
Best Practice: Avoid ad-hoc requests for international internships from
individual students: work directly with Program Director of Exchange
Program/Department Head or Professor for student referrals. University will screen
students for academic excellence; foreign language ability; maturity, and fit for
company/industry.
2.
Encourage students to apply six months in advance to coordinate
administrative and visa details.
3.
Best Practice: Have the student complete a domestic internship first with
your operating company before sending them abroad for an international assignment.
a.
Allows the student to learn about your industry and company culture
b. Allows student to develop relationships with colleagues and to set up
networking contacts
c.
internship
Assign the student an official mentor to help navigate them through their
Multifaceted Relations between Universities and
Siemens
What’s next?
Recruiting short and long-term
Workshop training and development
Equipment Donations for labs
Career Center Consultation
Education-to-Careers Course
Image/
Student as
future
Customer
Branding
Computer Donations
Sponsorship of special events
Faculty Externships
Advisory Board Participation
Engineering Curriculum Development
Research Project Funding
Scholarship Programs
Knowledge, R&D
Business through
University
Scale: 0 = not important 10 = very important
SBT
Siemens Building Technologies
Building Education TM
We can meet all your
facility needs …and help
your students succeed.
http://www.building-education.com
A Guide
Guide to
to Educational
Educational Partnerships
Partnerships and
and Long-Term
Long-Term Student
Student Hires
Hires
A
University of Cincinnati
International Co-op Programs (ICP)
Gayle G. Elliott, Assistant
Professor
Division of Professional Practice
Karl Zimmer, Plant Manger,
General Cable, Jackson Plant
International Co-op Program Structure
UC / ICP - five-year curriculum.
 One year of co-op experience in the US.
 German, Japanese, or Spanish
language and culture preparation.
 Choice of international electives.
 Capstone six-month co-op abroad
 Additional international opportunities
available.

UC Structure of ICP
Intro to Co-op
Orientation to
International Co-op
Intensive
Language
ICP
Schedule
1
F
W
S
S
Freshmen
F
W
2
S
S
Sophomore
3
F
W
4
S
S
Pre-Junior
5/6
F
W
S
Junior
S
F
W
S
Senior
General Cable Overview
Headquartered outside of Cincinnati,
OH
 World leader in manufacture of copper
& aluminum wire and cable
 $2 billion in sales
 20+ manufacturing facilities in N.
America, Oceania, Europe, and China
 8,000 employees

UC – General Cable Partnership

Top ten employers
–

Alternating terms in multiple sites
–
–

Consistent availability of candidates is key
Students willing to stay for 2+ quarters
International co-op assignments in Mexico
–

30 students annually
Two ChE’s in 2005
Potential international assignments in
France, Spain and China.
Tips for Universities

Create a program to utilize and enhance
your strengths.

Offer something extra -- make it easy
for employers to choose you.
–

Expats are no longer the “norm” in
business; take care of the administrative
side for employers
Keep your alumni involved.
Tips for Employers

Why not send students overseas?

While students are overseas,
supervisors and colleagues help by
taking time to speak their language with
American students.

Assess abilities and give students as
much responsibility as they can handle.

Don’t get pigeon-holed by students
course of study
Why Do It? (from University Standpoint)

Cost is less than full-time employees (with
families, relocation costs, etc.).
Co-op Students can fill short-term needs.
 Contacts and knowledge from US
assignments assist in international
environment/project work
 Opportunity to evaluate success in an
international environment.
.

Why Do It? (from Employer Standpoint)

Recruiting & Development
–

Culture
–

Transfer cultural experiences
Communication
–

Especially for the top students
Breakdown traditional barriers
ROI
–
Co-ops can be risk-takers and find the “big
solutions”
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Perspectives on International Co