Figurative
Language
Literal vs. Figurative
Language
• Literal Language – You say
exactly what you mean.
• Figurative Language – You
DON’T say exactly what you
mean. You compare, exaggerate,
or understate the situation.
Why Use Figurative
Language?
• Figurative language helps to paint a
picture in the reader’s mind.
• Figurative language stirs the reader’s
imagination.
• Figurative language brings out
emotions and understandings that
literal language does not.
• Figurative language keeps the
reader interested in reading!
Literal or Figurative???
1. Grant always turns in his homework.
2. When she sings her voice is like velvet.
3. The water was rising in the river because of the
rain.
4. Half of the class did not complete the
assignment.
5. I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.
6. Mike was so angry that steam was coming out of
his ears.
7. The zebras cried when the wise old elephant
died.
8. I’ve told you a million times to clean up your room.
Some Types of Figurative
Language
•
•
•
•
•
•
Simile
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Alliteration
Personification
Imagery
Simile
A comparison between two unlike
things using the words “like,” “as,”
“resembles,” or “than.”
Her eyes resemble stars.
Susan is as gentle as a
kitten.
Metaphor
A comparison between two unlike
things without using “like,” “as,”
“resembles,” or “than.” Saying one
thing is something else.
Her eyes were sparkling
emeralds.
My love is a red, red rose.
Hyperbole
A dramatic exaggeration to emphasize
a point.
This bag weighs a ton!
I’ve told you a million
times to clean up your
room!
Alliteration
The repetition of consonant sounds
occurring at the beginning of words
Miss Warren was worried
when Wendy was waiting.
Rubber baby buggy bumpers.
Peter Piper picked a peck of
pickled peppers.
Alliteration in Poetry
A flea and a fly in a flue
Were imprisoned, so what could they
do?
Said the fly, “Let us flee!”
“Let us fly,” said the flea;
So they flew through a flaw in the flue.
Personification
Giving human characteristics to things
that are not human.
The angry flood waters slapped the
house.
The sun smiled down on us.
Imagery
Vivid writing that appeals to one of the
five senses: sight, hearing, touch,
taste, smell.
She gulped down the cool
lemonade that was sugary sweet
and tangy tart at the same time.
As the pies baked, I inhaled the
scent of sweet apples and spicy
cinnamon.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Simile, metaphor, hyperbole,
alliteration, personification, or
imagery?
The cars are like frosted cakes covered
with snowflakes.
The west wind dances down the road.
A train is a dragon that roars through the
dark.
The teacher never calls on me!
The cat’s sandpaper tongue licked my
finger.
6. Susan suddenly stretched
slowly.
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Figurative Language - Ms. Campbell's 6th Grade English …