Genre: a distinctive category of
literary composition
Genre is a category,
group or kind based on
distinctive style, form
and content. One is just
right for YOU!
Genres We Will Study This Year
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Fiction
Nonfiction
Poetry
Drama
Media Literacy
Fiction vs. Nonfiction
Fiction
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a made up story, unreal,
not true, not factual
can tell about things that
could happen
is read for fun
characters may be like
real people or imaginary
Nonfiction
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has facts that can be
checked and proven
the author is an expert on
this information
real, factual, deals with
actual people, places,
and events
it IS TRUE!
Subgenres of Fiction
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Realistic Fiction
Historical Fiction
Science Fiction
Fantasy
High Fantasy
Mystery
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Folktales
Fables
Legends
Myths
Classics
Realistic Fiction
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Form of fiction (not true)
Accurately reflects life as it could be lived today
Everything in the story could happen to real people
living in our natural physical world
The characters have normal human characteristics
Story may be set in real places, but the story is NOT
based on history
Examples of Realistic Fiction
•Because of Winn Dixie
•Crash
•Owl Moon
•Shiloh
•Summer of the Swans
•Babysitter Club series
Historical Fiction
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Form of fiction (not true)
Based on historical events
Authentic settings
Characters portrayed in realistic manner
Some characters may be actual people from
history, but the story is fictional
Artistic mix of fiction and historical fact
Examples of Historical Fiction
•A Boy at War
•Across Five Aprils
•Ben and Me
•The Butterfly
•Charlie Skedaddle
•Sign of the Beaver
•Titanic Crossing
•Dear America Series
Science Fiction
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Form of fiction (not true)
Contains some sort of scientific element, such as
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Outer space
Medicine
Technology
Within the realm of possibility
Characters have some believable traits/qualities
Examples of Science Fiction
•Aliens for Breakfast
•A Wrinkle in Time
•My Best Friend is Invisible
•Star Wars
•The Time Machine
Fantasy
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Form of fiction (not true)
Contains one or more of the following:
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supernatural occurrences
characters with magical powers
things with magical powers
animals with human characteristics
real people in fantastic places
fantastic creatures or characters in real situations
Examples of Fantasy
•Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
•Charlotte’s Web
•The Wreck of the Zephyr
High Fantasy
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Form of fiction (not real)
Good vs. evil (supernatural/evil forces)
Story written in a series of books/ volumes
Coming- of- age themes
Include fantastical elements, such as:
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Elves and dwarves
Magic
Wizards
Invented languages
quests
Examples of High Fantasy
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Lord of the Rings
Harry Potter Series
Mystery
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Form of fiction (not true)
Story revolves around a puzzle/problem
Characters deal with the solution to a
puzzle/problem, such as
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finding a missing item/person
unraveling a secret
rationalize an event that is not explained
Contains clues/hints that help the characters and
readers solve the puzzle/problem
Examples of Mystery
•The House of Dies Drear
•Never Say Die
•The Treehouse Mystery
•Mystery of the Midnight Message
•Encyclopedia Brown Series
•Boxcar Children Mysteries
Folktales
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Form of fiction (not true)
Story that teaches a lesson
Contain the beliefs and customs of a region
or country
Original story is modified to make it more
interesting or more humorous
Present larger-than-life characters and very
unusual happenings
Examples of Folktales
•Aesop’s Fables
•Beauty and the Beast
•The Bunyans
•Cinderella
•John Henry
•The Talking Eggs
•The Tortoise and the Hare
Fables
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Form of fiction (not true)
Type of folktale
Ends in a moral or lesson
Characters are animals that talk and act like
humans
A character usually represents a single
human characteristic, such as a fox being
symbolic of a trickster
Legend
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Form of fiction (not true)
Stories written about a real life hero and his/her
mighty deeds
Mix of fiction and historical facts that have been
creatively altered to encourage moral conduct and
right choices
Leaves questions/wonder in the reader’s minds (Did
Mike Fink really wrestle a grizzly bear?)
Myths
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Form of fiction (not true)
Pertains to the actions of the gods and/or
goddesses
Characters are super-natural beings with
human emotions and qualities
Plot may involve interplay between worlds
(this world and previous/original world)
Classics
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Form of fiction (not true)
Timelessness: enjoyed by readers from generation
to generation
Deals with universal themes and experiences that
relate to readers, such as:
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love conquers all
good vs. evil
rags to riches
Communicates ideas across cultures
Unforgettable characters
Subgenres of Nonfiction
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Expository Nonfiction
Biography
Autobiography
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Interview
Informational
Narrative Nonfiction
Expository Nonfiction
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Expository nonfiction provides information
about real-life persons, objects, or ideas.
Expository nonfiction may include graphic
sources, such as charts and photos, that
show information.
A chart is a sheet of information.
Facts are arranged in an easy-to-read form.
Biography
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Story of a real person’s life
Form of nonfiction (true)
Bios means life
Graphe means to write
Author must do research by interviewing the
subject or those who knew the subject
Examples of Biography
•Tiger Woods: An American Master
•The HomerunKings: BabeRuth and
Henry Aaron
•Clara Barton, a Red Cross Pioneer
•Sacagawea
Autobiography
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Form of nonfiction (true)
Story of a real person’s life
Auto means self
Bios means life
Graphe means to write
Written by the person the story is about
Author does not need to do research
Author shares how he/she feels and what he/she
thinks
Interview
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In an interview the interviewer asks
questions. The other person, the subject,
answers.
Interviews usually appear in magazines or
newspapers.
Informational
Informational books are nonfiction
books that give true facts on a variety
of subjects.
Examples of Informational Writing
•Dirt Bikes
•Flying Animals
•Danger! Earthquakes
•Newspapers
•Encyclopedias
Narrative Nonfiction
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A narrative is writing that tells about events.
Narrative nonfiction tells about events that
really happened.
Poetry
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Poetry has many different definitions
Poetry is an arrangement of words in lines
having rhythm. Sometimes those lines
rhyme, as in this narrative poem.
The art of rhythmical composition, written or
spoken, for exciting pleasure by beautiful,
imaginative, or elevated thoughts.
Examples of Poetry
•Where the Sidewalk Ends
•New Kid on the Block
•Chocolate Dreams: Poems
•Mammalabilia
•A Pizza the Size of the Sun
•Love That Dog
Drama/Play
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Like a novel or a short story, a play tells a
story but it is written to be acted out for an
audience. Plays have many unique literary
elements such as acts, scenes, stage
directions, and speech tags.
Media Literacy
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Media Literacy is the ability to access,
analyze, evaluate and create media in a
variety of forms.
What is media?
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Ads
News
Websites
Much more!
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Genre: a distinctive category of literary composition