Bridging the Empirical Divide
of College Teaching and Student Learning
Karen Kurotsuchi Inkelas
P. Jesse Rine
Inaugural Academic Symposium
April 14, 2011
CASTLHE
Center for Advanced Study
of Teaching & Learning
in Higher Education
Two parallel streams
in the teaching and learning literature
College
teaching
and
pedagogy
Student
learning
outcomes
assessment
CASTLHE
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Literature on college teaching and pedagogy
• Teaching and pedagogical best practices
– NSSE Benchmarks of Effective Educational Practices
– McKeachie’s Teaching Tips
• Learning Styles
– Index of Learning Styles
(Richard Felder & Barbara Solomon)
– Multiple Intelligences (Howard Gardner)
• Course evaluations
• Classroom assessment
CASTLHE
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Literature on student learning
outcomes assessment
• Typologies of outcomes assessed
– AAC&U Essential Learning Outcomes
– Lumina’s Degree Qualifications Profile
– Wabash Study of Liberal Arts Education
• Institutional-level assessments
– Peggy Maki, Trudy Banta, Linda Suskie, etc.
• Accreditation/Quality assurance
– SACS, SCHEV
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Several stakeholders with varying interests
College teaching
and pedagogy
Student learning
outcomes assessment
Faculty
Students
Parents
Public
policymakers
Accreditors
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For optimal effectiveness,
the two streams need to integrate
College
teaching
and
pedagogy
Student
learning
outcomes
assessment
CASTLHE
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One place to start:
Mandatory SCHEV competency assessments
• Quantitative reasoning
• Writing
• Scientific reasoning
• Critical thinking
• Oral communication
• Undergraduate research
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Other recommended student learning outcomes
AAC&U’s
Essential Learning Outcomes
•
Lumina’s
Degree Qualifications Profile
Knowledge of human cultures
and the physical & natural
world
•
Intellectual skills
•
Specialized knowledge
•
Intellectual & practical skills
•
Broad, integrative knowledge
•
Personal & social responsibility
•
Civic learning
•
Integrative & applied learning
•
Applied learning
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Popular methods for assessing
student learning outcomes (Maki, 2004)
•
Direct methods
•
•
•
Indirect methods
•
•
•
Students’ demonstration of learning via some form of standardized test focusing
on aspects of student learning
Examples: CAAP, CLA, MAPP, plus GRE subject tests, PRAXIS tests, etc.
Students’ perceptions of their learning and the educational environment that
supports that learning
Examples: NSSE, NSLLP
Performance-based methods
•
Students represent learning in response to assignments/projects that are
embedded into their educational experiences
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Teaching methods showcased
in UVa Academic Symposium presentations
Reflective
Writing
Case Study
Technology
Observation
Interdisciplinarity
Collaborative
Learning
Real-world
Simulation
Immersion
Mentoring
Active Learning
Service Learning
CASTLHE
Problem-based
Learning
10
Assessment methods integrated
into UVa Academic Symposium presentations
Assessment of SLOs?
Type of assessment?
Direct
No
Yes
Performance
11%
47%
37%
42%
63%
Indirect
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Student learning outcomes assessed as part
of UVa Academic Symposium presentations
Writing Skills
Self-reflection
Personal
Satisfaction
Environmental
Awareness
Professional
Skills
Analytical
Reasoning
Verbal
Communication
Community
Service
Content
Knowledge
Critical Thinking
Intercultural
Competence
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Where do we go from here?
• How can we marshal an inclusive, crossgrounds approach to assessing the nexus
between college teaching and student
learning outcomes that satisfies all
stakeholders?
• This is the primary goal of CASTL-HE
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Next: Two different ways to assess
student learning
• Using the Collegiate Learning Assessment (a standardized test)
– Josipa Roksa
• Using learning portfolios (Teaching Resource Center)
– Dorothe Bach
– Marva Barnett
CASTLHE
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