Overcoming Illiteracy in
Secondary Schools
TESOL ’07
Seattle, WA
Sheila Acevedo
Department of Multicultural Education
The School District of Palm Beach County, FL
[email protected]
School District Facts
• Total Budget $3.4 Billion
• US Ranking 11th largest school district
in the US
• State Ranking 5th largest school district
in Florida
• Enrollment 168,546 in 185 Schools
• Average Cost/Student $6,356 (FY05)
2
• No. of Employees 21,707 (including
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
teachers)
No. of Teachers 12,535
Avg. Teacher Salary $48,481
Beg. Teacher Salary $33,830
Avg. Class Size PK-3 = 17
Avg. Class Size Grades 4-8 = 21
Avg. Class Size Grades 9-12 = 24
No. of ESOL 18,740
Languages/Dialects 156
3
Main | Definitions | Back | Print | Tips for Printing |
Reading 2006
Total Test Scores
Group
Name
Palm Beach
Grade
%
Pass
1
2
3
4
5
8
13067
NA
25
29
31
13
2
840
NA
79
17
4
0
13500
NA
29
29
25
974
NA
85
12
12764
53
38
909
6
90
9
LEP
Palm Beach
LEP
% in Achievement Level
No. of
Student
s
LEP
Palm Beach
Mean Points Earned By Reporting Category
10
Words/
Phrases
Main Idea/
Purpose
Comparisons
Reference
Research
4
12
6
9
0
2
8
3
5
11
6
2
12
6
7
3
1
0
1
7
3
4
28
17
7
10
3
11
8
10
9
1
0
0
2
7
5
6
*No data are reported when fewer than 10 students were tested or when all students are in the same score category.
4
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA
MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS*
LOWEST 25% MAKING READING GAINS FOR EACH NCLB GROUP
TOTAL
WHITE
BLACK
HISPANIC
FREEREDUCED
LUNCH
ESE
ELL
SCHOOLS/NUMBER
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
District High Schools/23
56/5363
58/1872
55/1973
53/1292
54/2266
47/1345
57/1149
District Middle Schools/32
73/8477
74/2820
71/2989
75/2257
72/4746
68/2672
75/1854
District Alternative
Schools/21
40/112
***/***
42/90
44/14
46/71
28/30
23/14
District Charter Schools/36
58/603
63/160
56/143
59/143
61/363
54/115
68/85
Department of Juvenile
Justice/4
53/12 (1
school)
**
**
**
**
**
**
*Run 08/16/2006
** = No Data Available
***= N < 10
5
THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA
MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL RESULTS*
LOWEST 25% MAKING MATH GAINS FOR EACH NCLB GROUP
TOTAL
WHITE
BLACK
HISPANIC
FREEREDUCED
LUNCH
ESE
ELL
SCHOOLS/NUMBER
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
PCT/N
District High Schools/23
70/3624
72/1045
68/1589
70/882
69/1702
65/1198
71/852
District Middle Schools/32
66/6483
68/1822
63/2675
67/1699
63/3961
59/2389
67/1440
District Alternative
Schools/21
28/253
5/22
31/196
22/32
26/177
22/74
13/31
District Charter Schools/36
59/559
56/135
57/290
68/113
60/349
56/104
61/67
Department of Juvenile
Justice/4
**
**
**
**
**
**
**
*Run 08/16/2006
** = No Data Available
***= N < 10
6
District ELL Support for all ELL Students through the
Department of Multicultural Education
•
•
•
•
•
•
Executive Director
ESOL Program Planner
Foreign Language Planner
Multicultural Team Manager
Migrant Education Manager
ESOL Specialist for Charter &
ESE Schools
• Holocaust Studies Program
Planner
• Staff Development/ Training
Specialist
• Guidance Counselor
Specialist
• Multicultural Program
Planner
• District Resource Teachers
• School-based Coordinators
• ESOL Teachers
• Language Translators
• Language Facilitators
• Bilingual Counselors
7
Personnel Requirements (per FL Consent Decree,
8/1990 & Modification 4/2003
• Category I- Teachers of Basic ESOL, English Language
Arts, English, or Reading, including ESE to 1+ student(s)
must be ESOL Endorsed or Certified
• Category II-Teachers of basic subjects (Math, Science,
Social Studies, & Computer Science) must have 60 inservice pts. Or 3 semester hours of approved ESOL
Endorsement college course
• Category III- Teachers of all other subjects must have 18
in-service pts. Or 3 semester hours of approved ESOL
Endorsement college course
8
District School Support Personnel
• 1 Sheltered ESOL teacher for every 20
Sheltered students (AAA schools 1:18)
• 1 6-hour paraprofessional for every 4 units
• 1 CLF (Community Language Facilitator
for every language, other than English,
with 15+ LY ELL students
• 1 Bilingual/bicultural guidance counselor
for 600+ LY ELL students
9
District Partnerships with Universities and Colleges
Florida Atlantic University
Lynn University
Nova Southeastern University
Palm Beach Community College
Additional Staff Development Opportunities
Collaborative Training Team
Coaches
Training Teams (Teachers & Administrators)
Observation of Best Practices
Summer Institutes
Educational Visits Abroad
Local, State, & National Conferences
Local Palm Beach County TESOL organization
Sunshine State TESOL
TESOL International
10
Those (students) arriving after age 12 with good formal schooling in L1
made steady gains,
but
by the end of high school they had run out of time to catch up academically
with native-English speaking students...
Most who continued on to college did eventually catch up.
Younger students may make dramatic gains in the early grades,
but generally don’t continue to maintain those gains
once they are exited from special services.
Estimates are that 30-40% of school-age English language learners
fail to reach acceptable levels of English reading
by the end of their elementary schooling.
(Thomas & Collier, 1997.)
11
The only obstacle to learning a second
language is not having learned a first
language by puberty
(Bralystok and Hakuta, 1996).
Given mastery of a first language, the
transfer of literacy skills from L1 to L2 and
mastery of one or more additional languages is
beyond the reach of no one at any age.
12
The English Language Development Continuum
A Standards Based, Comprehensible,
and Academically Rigorous
ESOL Program of Instruction for
English Language Learners
Updated 2006
Developed by
The
Department of Multicultural Education
Ana Meehan, Executive Director
Art Johnson, Ph.D.
Superintendent
The School District of Palm Beach County
13
Inspired by Curran’s Counseling-Learning model,
Dean Stecker (1997) developed a modified version of the CLL
model that is recommended for ESOL classrooms in Palm
Beach County.
•The teacher/facilitator is at the center of the classroom.
•The teacher interacts only with the groups.
•Members of each group organize themselves so that as the
teacher calls
on their group to respond to questions or to report on tasks
completed.
•Each member knows when it is his turn to speak.
•That person does not speak for himself, but for the group.
•The group can assist the speaker even as the response is
being made
to the teacher.
•If the response is correct, the group is correct.
14
English Language Development Plan
2006-2007
Dates for Review of Adequate Progress
9-Week Periods
All ESOL teachers should use the beginning and ending dates
of the 9-week periods
to review adequate progress on the ELDC.
The dates coincide approximately
with secondary report card distribution dates.
15
Instructional Focus
Exposure to the written form of English
should not be postponed
until some oral mastery of English is attained.
On the contrary,
oral mastery should be built around
a balanced literacy approach
that incorporates listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Similarly, both oral and written
English language development
must be linked to academic development.
16
Determining Student Level
Pupil Progression
Individual ELL Plan
ELL Committee Meetings
LF Monitoring Period
Standards Based Report
Card
17
District Assessment Tools
Appendix B: Assessment Tools.......................................Appendix page 2
 ELDC Dates for Review of Adequate Progress ....Appendix page 3
 Instructions for Employing the Written Language Development
Indicator-Primary Language (WLDI-P) .......................Appendix page 4
 Written Language Development Indicator-Primary Language
(WLDI-P) .....................................................................Appendix page 6
 Available Translations of Instructions for the Written Language
Development Indicator- Primary Language (WLDI-P).Appendix page 7
 Reference Worksheet............................................Appendix page 17
 ELDC Levels & Assessments Instructions for Employing the Oral
Language Development Indicator (OLDI) .................Appendix page 18
 Oral Language Development Indicator (OLDI) ...................Last page
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/ESOLCurriculumDocs/All/En
glishLanguageDevelopmentContinuumJune06.pdf
18
Alignment to the Standards
The English Language Development Continuum
and accompanying assessment pieces
as presented in the Palm Beach School District
manual are aligned with
English as a New Language (ENL)
Standards II, IV and IX.
19
English Language Instructional Models
Academic Sheltered Instruction
•In-Class Collaboration or Pull-out
Students acquire English Language Proficiency and
the academic language necessary to succeed in
cognitively demanding classes
•Students meet SSS for promotion and graduation
requirements
(ESOL classes and Sheltered Content, Mainstream
Electives)
20
ESOL Support
•Language Arts and Content Area Instruction in the
Mainstream Classroom
•Classroom teachers are ESOL Endorsed, Certified or
Trained, depending on subjects
•Teachers use ESOL strategies
•Advanced level speakers
•Beginning & Intermediate level speakers at schools
without additional ESOL personnel AND the parent
requests that their student remains at the Home School
(not transferred to an ESOL Center)
•Students acquire cognitive and academic proficiency in
English
•Students meet SSS for promotion and graduation
21
requirements
Two-Way Immersion (Dual Language)
•Heritage language students from a single language background are
grouped with fluent English speakers for instruction
•Students of both language groups are integrated for language arts and
content instruction
•Half of the instruction is in English and half in the heritage/target
language
•Beginning, Intermediate & Advanced level speakers
•Fluent English speakers
•Students become bilingual and bi-literate
•Students achieve academic excellence in two languages
•Students develop cultural awareness and sensitivity
•Students meet Florida SSS for promotion and graduation requirements
22
Secondary Dual Language
Support Personnel
• 1 Dual Language teacher for every 20
participating LY/LF ELL students
• 1 6-hour paraprofessional for every 4 Dual
Language units
• 1 CLF (Community Language Facilitator for
every language, other than English, with 15+ LY
ELL students
• 1 ESOL Coordinator for schools with 5+ units
• 1 ESOL bilingual/bicultural guidance counselor
for high schools with 200+ LY ELL students, with
an additional counselor for 600+ students
23
The Alternative Education ESOL Case Study
Instructional Model*
Approved by the School District of Palm Beach County and the
Florida Department of Education in the Limited English Proficient
Students District Plan: 2004/2005 to 2007/2008
The ESOL Team reviews individual LEP student records
weekly to determine the types of instructional and support services,
according to individual student needs
The ESOL Team schedules and provides instructional support,
including direct instruction, ESOL testing, collaborative instruction,
native language assistance,or tutoring, interpretation and translation
services, and community linkages
*Developed by Sheila D. Acevedo
24
Who are at-risk students? They are
Students who
are in danger of
failing, those
who may drop
out, those who
are truant, or
those who have
dropped out.
Ages 7-18
Department of
Juvenile Justice
adjudicated &
pending
adjudication youth.
Students
enrolled in day
treatment
programs.
Students
whose
behavior
patterns are
historically
outside
accepted
parameters.
1st – 12th grade
students who
are suspended,
pending
expulsion, or
expelled from
regular public
school.
Students who are
incarcerated in a
detention center,
jail, or maximum
security facility; on
probation, or
house arrest.
Students living
in residential
therapeutic
treatment
centers.
Students who
are
academically
challenged: 2+
years below
level of peers;
and often
illiterate in our
native
languages. 25
Opening the locks chaining
youth to their circumstances
begins with a good education,
health & social services.
Sheila D. Acevedo, 2005
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Educational Alternatives ESOL Students
July 1, 2005 – March 9, 2006 (Ss = 643)
250
200
150
LY
LF
LZ
100
50
0
Juvenile
Justice
LY = 19
LF = 19
LZ = 84
Therapeutic
LY = 7
LF = 5
LZ = 31
1st-5th
6th-12th
Transition Transition
LY = 5
LF = 5
LZ = 2
LY = 19
LF = 33
LZ = 130
6th-12th
Choice
LY = 54
LF = 23
LZ = 207
LY = BEGINNERS – INTERMEDIATE –ADVANCED ESOL
LF = MONITORING FOR COMPLETION OF ESOL PROGRAM
LZ = EXITED ESOL PROGRAM
Sheila D. Acevedo, 2006
27
BRIM Instructional Design (90 minutes total time*)
• 20 minutes of
• Whole group literacy
instruction with all students
• 10 minute
• Whole-class wrap-up/
closure
• 15 min. all students
• Independent reading with
audiotapes or leveled trade
books
•
•
15 min.
Literacy instruction through
technology, 5-6 students on 5-6
computers (or writing
alternative)
•
•
15min.
Student-student Interaction
(listening, speaking, or editing)
•
15 min.
Small group teacher directed
instruction with 5-6 students
*Times are suggested, and may be adjusted to accommodate the needs
of individual classrooms and schedules. The ratio of the time in rotations
should remain balanced, however.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
28
Alternative Scheduling for BRIM
Question 1: What if I don’t have 90+ minutes of instructional time?
You can still have the whole group instruction at the beginning and end of
each period.
Having 4 rotations will make each rotation too short to be beneficial, so it is
suggested that you alternate rotations.
A suggested schedule is shown:
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3
Monday Small group w/ teacher Reading Listening-Speaking
Tuesday Computer Small group w/ teacher Reading
Wednesday Listening-Speaking Computer Small group w/ teacher
Thursday Reading Listening-Speaking Computer
Friday Small group w/ teacher Reading Listening-Speaking
The following week the above schedule would begin with Computer for Group
1, and so on.
To create your own schedule, just follow the pattern: Small group with teacher,
Reading, Listening-speaking, Computer, etc..
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
29
Modeled Read Aloud:
Reading aloud by a skilled reader who models proper pitch,
intonation, and pacing.
Writing:
The students watch as the teacher thinks, talks, & demonstrates the
writing process.
Language Experience:
Students’ oral compositions are transcribed and used as materials for
instruction in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It is both
reading and writing, thus falls on the line.
Shared Writing: Teacher & students collaborate
Shared Reading: Learner observes an in composing a text.
Responses and input are expert reading with fluency & expression,
and encouraged from everyone. reads along.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
30
Guided Writing: Teacher guides students
Guided Reading: Teacher and responds to them, and
extends their thinking while they compose text. students
each have a copy of the text.
Together they think, talk, and question their way through
the material.
Independent Writing: Students write independently
without teacher intervention.
Independent Reading: Students read self-selected books
independently.
31
Strong Teacher Support
to
Student Independence
You do and I watch.
You do and I help.
I do and You help.
I do and You watch.
32
ESOL Instructional Materials and Courses
Middle School and High School
English through ESOL* is REQUIRED for all sheltered ELL students.
High School ENG I through ESOL (1002300) ENG II through ESOL
(1002310)
ENG III through ESOL (1002320) ENG IV through ESOL (1002520)
Middle School M/J Language Arts 1 through ESOL (M/J 1002000)
M/J Language Arts 2 through ESOL (M/J 1002010)
M/J Language Arts 3 through ESOL (M/J 1002020)
Materials:
• Use the grade-appropriate Prentice Hall materials and the English
Learner’s Companion that accompany each level.
• Visit our website for parallel curriculum materials written especially for
ELL Students.
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/multicultural/MulticulturalNew/ESOLCurricu
lum.htm
33
 Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL* (DLA) (HS 1002380)
(M/J 1002180) is designated by the District Reading Plan for FCAT Level 1
or 2 ELL students categorized as B-1, B-2, I-1, or I-2 on the ELDC and can
be multi-grade. I-3 students may be placed into either Developmental
Language Arts through ESOL or Intensive Reading, depending upon their
English proficiency.
Like Intensive Reading, this course receives an elective credit. The
Balanced CARE rotational instructional model is highly recommended.
Exposure to on-grade-level Lexiled material should occur once a week.
Materials previously purchased and delivered to schools for use in
Developmental Language Arts through ESOL are listed below. They should
not be used in English through ESOL classes:
• Hampton-Brown Highpoint book, The Basics
• Hampton-Brown Highpoint A, B, or C may also be used (if you have it).
• Red Brick High Five
• Great Source Reading Advantage A or B
• Heinle Picture Dictionaries in Spanish, Haitian Creole, or Portuguese
• Classes at AAA Schools have additional materials.
34
 Intensive Reading* (HS 1000410) and (M/J 1000010):
The District Reading Plan has designated that ELL students in FCAT
Levels 1 or 2 that are in ELDC categories A-1, A-2, and A-3 are to
take the Intensive Reading course. (I-3 students may be placed into
either Developmental Language Arts through ESOL or Intensive
Reading, depending upon their English proficiency.)
In Intensive Reading, ELL students are scheduled into classes with
non-ELL students and use the same materials as the mainstream
students are using in this course. ELL students should have equal
access to READ 180 and all other instructional programs.
35
Some suggested Software:
♦ Dyn Ed First English (800-765-4375) For true beginners, ages 10-17, a
multimedia English
language course that promotes learning and long-term retention. Level:
Beginner.
Features: coordinated lessons and exercises to keep students engaged;
scope and
sequence; Interactive features such as speech record/playback to promote
language
mastery and oral fluency; Content that automatically adjusts to student
performance;
Optimized skill sequencing, beginning with listening.
♦ Dyn Ed On Our Way to English (800-765-4375) for ages 11-17. Levels:
Basic –Intermediate. Features: English for school subjects, school life, and
related situations;
Comprehensive, content-based syllabus; a variety of lesson types and
exercises based on a
well-designed scope and sequence
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
36
♦ ELLIS (English Language Learning Instructional System) (866-211-0721)
Multimedia software designed to teach learners of varying ages and levels to
speak and understand English. The ELLIS curriculum combines graphics, fullmotion video, digitized sound and voice recording, animation, and support for 60+
native languages. ELLIS’ research-based English language technology instruction
includes the capability to Instruct and provide transition support in 60+ native
languages; instruct phonemic awareness via hundreds of minimal pairs in each
language; provide over 3,000 hours of software instruction; track student(s)
progress and measure proficiency; make student instructional path
recommendations; provide parent letters written in their native language;
correlate with major academic standards; teach at all levels of K-Adult education.
♦ LightSpan Achieve Now (888-888-4314)
A research-based curriculum program that includes interactive software, school
and home learning activities, teacher materials, onsite and technology-based
professional development and student assessment. Components address oral
language development, listening, speaking, awareness of sound, symbol, and
structure, skill integration, reading
comprehension strategies, writing, vocabulary, and spelling.
37
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
♦ Open Book to Literacy (877-719-1804) combines rich-media technology with
research based teaching methodologies to teach English reading, writing and
pronunciation to beginning, remedial, ESL, and adult learners of all ages. It
uses a combination of voice, text, video, graphics, and photos, and heritagelanguage translation within a framework that comprises comprehensive,
scientifically based, English literacy teaching methodology and meets all
existing research-based literacy teaching standards including No Child Left
Behind, Title I and Title III, Head Start, The National Reading Panel, and the
reading standards of all 50 states
♦ Riverdeep: Destination Reading (888-242-6747) is appropriate for beginning
and intermediate language learners of all ages, and general education
students from preschool to third grade. Grounded in scientific research, the
internet-based program uses a structured whole/part/whole approach to
reading instruction through the use of colorful cartoon figures,
music, and interactive activities. Learners are explicitly taught phonics,
decoding, and comprehension skills in the context of a wide range of
authentic fiction, non-fiction and environmental text. The management system
provides careful sequencing of reading and writing skill development so that
each new skill builds upon prior skill learning. It is aligned with state and
national curricula standards, and fully conforms to research-focused funding
requirements.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
38
♦ Rosetta Stone Software (800-788-0822) provides a comprehensive
language learning system for learners of any age. The core of the
learning is provided by multimedia instruction available in networkable
CD-ROMs and online programs. The program includes a set of written
materials that reinforce and expand students' learning. The Rosetta
Stone software includes course planning, management, as well as
individual student placement, tracking, and accountability.
♦ Scholastic READ 180 (800-234-READ) is a comprehensive reading
intervention program designed to meet the needs of students from
elementary to high school whose reading achievement is below the
proficient level. It combines teacher-led instruction with adaptive
instructional software, motivates students with materials that engage
and respect the older struggling reader, and meets the needs of delayed
or failing readers, students with learning disabilities, special education
students, and English Language Learners.
39
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
39
♦ Wiggleworks
(http://teacher.scholastic.com/products/wiggleworks/index.htm) is
an award winning blend of technology, literature, and teacher
support. This media-rich program integrates leveled books with
technology and instruction to help children become successful
readers and writers, provides leveled reading practice, built-in
instruction, and motivation to engage students in reading and
writing, and helps teachers scaffold instruction and move students
toward reading independence.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
40
Sites for teachers
http://www.sitesforteachers.com/
provides websites for more than 1,300 printable books, lesson plans and
worksheets to teach guided reading, phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency,
and reading comprehension.
o Starfall.com
The Starfall learn-to-read website is offered free as a public service.
Teachers around the country are using Starfall materials as an
inexpensive way to make the classroom more fun and to inspire a love of
reading and writing.
Primarily designed for first grade, Starfall.com is also useful for
prekindergarten, kindergarten and second grade, and may be useful to older
ELL students learning a second language.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
41
Additional Literacy Resources for Teachers
♦ Children’s Literature Web Guide
http://www.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/index.html
♦ Cyberguides http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/score/cyberguide.html
♦ International Reading Association http://www.reading.org
♦ The Literacy Web http://www.literacy.uconn.edu
♦ Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration on the Internet can be
found at:
http:/www.ed.gov/teachers/how/tech/international/index.html?exp=0
The Teacher's Guide to International Collaboration was developed to help
teachers use the Internet to "reach out" globally. These materials were
prepared as part of the Department of Education's International Education
Initiative. The topic bars on the left side provide quick access to lesson
plans and student activities.
BRIM Handbook: Dr. Lisa R. Troute, School District of Palm Beach County
42
TOOLBOX FOR FCAT SUCCESS
PREPARING FOR FCAT READING
Table of Contents
Determining Main Idea Stated or Implied …..………………………..………….2-24
Identifying Significant Details …………………….…..………………..……....25-39
Following Written Directions and the Sequence of Data ……….…..…..……40-49
Recognizing Sequence .………………………………………………..………..50-70
Pre-reading Strategies …………………………………………….…….……...71-89
Using Context Clues .…...…………………………………..………….….…..90-118
Classifying ……………………………………………………………….……119-129
Using Comparison Contrast ……….…………………………………………130-148
Identifying Cause and Effect…………….……………………………………149-162
Making Conclusions, Generalizations and Inferences..…………..............163-174
Distinguishing Facts and Opinions …...…………………………………….175-187
Identifying Organizational Patterns of a Reading …………………………188-209
Recognizing Author’s Purpose, Point of View, and Tone..………………..210-220
Using Methods of Persuasion ………………………………………………221-235
Using Literary Elements ……..………………………………………………..236-266
Using Literary Devices …………………………………………………………267-294
Gathering Information ……..……………………………………………..….295-304
Analyzing the Validity and Reliability of Primary Sources …………………305-319
Synthesizing Information ………………………………………………………320-332
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/ESOLCurriculumDocs/Secondary/TOOLBOX%20F
OR%20FCAT%20SUCCES2%20in%20one%20file%20without%20microskills.pdf
43
The School District of Palm Beach County Department of Multicultural
Education
Curriculum Resources
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/ESOL.htm
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/MulticulturalNew/ESOLCurriculu
mSecondaryLangArts.htm
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/MulticulturalNew/ESOLCurriculu
mSecondaryMath.htm
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/MulticulturalNew/ESOLCurriculu
mSecondarySci.htm
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/MulticulturalNew/ESOLCurriculu
mSecondarySS.htm
http://www.palmbeach.k12.fl.us/Multicultural/MulticulturalNew/MultiCurric.htm
44
Palm Beach County School District Contacts
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sheila Acevedo, ESOL Specialist for Charter & ESE Schools
561.650.6696 Phone 561.650.6695 FAX
[email protected]
561.650.6696 Phone 561.650.6695 FAX
Connie Berry, Guidance Counselor Specialist
561.434.7348 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Ana Meehan, Executive Director, Multicultural Education
561.434.8010 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Eileen Shapiro, Holocaust Studies Program Planner
561.434.8169 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Kim Thomasson, Dual Language Specialist
561.434.8201 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Lisa Troute, ESOL Curriculum Specialist
561.649.6886 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Carole Wilkinson, ESOL Training Specialist
561.434.8320 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
Diana Williams, Manager, Multicultural Education
561.649.6840 Phone 561.434.8074 FAX
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Palm Beach County, FL - TESOL International Association