Colon Hydrotherapy
Michael Hamilton
Advisor: Prof. Fahringer
Overview
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History of Colon Hydrotherapy
Theory
Information about I-ACT
Concerns
Contraindications
Medical Benefits
History
• Colon Hydrotherapy is the natural evolution of the
enema
• The enema was first recorded in ancient Egyptian
documents
• Also mentioned in the writings of Great Civilizations
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Sumerians
Chinese
Hindus
Greeks
Romans
Hamiltons
History cont.
• Most pre-eminent physicians reported on the
value of the enema
• Hippocrates
• Galen
• Regnier DeGraff
• 17th Century known as the “age of the
clyster”
History cont.
• Many European Kings appreciated the benefits of
the Enema
• Louis XI - credited the enema with relieving attack
of seizures
• Louis XIII received over 200 enemas in one year
History cont.
• Louis the XIV, ardent
supporter
• Had over 2,000 enemas during
his reign.
• He even received court
functionaries and visitors during
the procedure1.
1.Lieberman, William, M.D., “The Enema”, The Review of
Gastroenterology,
Volume 13, May-June 1946
Court Function During Enema
History cont.
• In the early 1900s, Dr. Kellogg popularizes
colon cleansing
• He reported in the 1917 Journal of American
Medicine that in over 40,000 cases, as a result of
diet, exercise, and enema (colon hydrotherapy),
“in all but twenty cases”, he had used no surgery
for the treatment of gastrointestinal disease in his
patients.
History cont.
• 1950’s
• colon hydrotherapy was flourishing in the U.S.
• the prestigious Beverly Boulevard in California was then
known as “colonic row”
• Mid-1960’s
• colon hydrotherapy slowly dwindled
• Early 1970’s
• most colon hydrotherapy instruments were removed
from the hospitals and nursing homes
• PRESCRIPTIVE LAXATIVES and SURGERY GAIN FAVOR
History Summary
• Colon hydrotherapy/enemas have
been around for thousands of years
• Two IMPORTANT conclusions
• First, there is something of value by cleansing
the colon
• Second, it has never received the attention it
justly deserves
Theory
• Extended and more complete form
of an enema
• Gently infuse warm, filtered water into
the rectum
• End Results
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Hydrates the colon
Waste is softened and loosened
Evacuation is through normal peristalsis
Irrigates/cleanses the colon
Theory cont.
• Modern FDA registered
equipment
• Carried out by qualified
personnel
• Cleans beyond the rectosigmoid
area through a series of fill and
empty cycles
• Safe and effective when
guidelines are adhered to
Theory cont.
• Various Types of FDA registered equipment
I-ACT
• International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy
• I-ACT is the International Association for Colon
Hydrotherapy
• I-ACT establishes the training standards and guidelines
• I-ACT is committed to work with the FDA, International
organizations, states and municipalities to enhance the
safety of colon hydrotherapy
• I-ACT is the certifying body for colon hydrotherapists around
the world
I-ACT cont.
• Membership
• Over 2200 Members
• Over 400 International Members
• Certification Levels
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Foundation Level
Intermediate Level
Advanced Level
Instructor Level
Concerns
• What about contamination or
spread of disease?
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Only report was in New England
Journal of Medicine,
August 5, 1982
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No reports of contamination when
using modern FDA registered
equipment and the equipment is
disinfected according to
manufacturer guidelines
Single use, disposable speculums /
rectal tubes, and tubing
Concerns
• What about puncturing of the colon?
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There have been allegations of puncture when using
enemas and colonic irrigation
Recommend caution during insertion of speculum/rectal
tube and follow the recommendation of the
physician/healthcare provider and/or the manufacturer of
the equipment
• Facts
• The pressure of the water during the session is very low
• from 1/4 lbs. to 2.0 lbs
• The Speculum / Rectal Tube in only inserted
approximately 2 inches into the rectum
Concerns
• How will I assure the
patients therapist is
reputable?
• Recommend that the patient
seek the services of an I-ACT
certified colon hydrotherapist
using currently registered FDA
equipment and disposable
supplies, and filtered water
Concerns
• Electrolyte imbalances
• Study conducted by National
University
• John R. Collins, N.D., Paul Mittman, N.D., Mara
Katlaps, B.A.
• “No patients experienced any clinically
significant complications or complaints during or
after the course of treatment.”
• Only problem might be encountered with
paraplegics that are unable to completely
release their bowels.
Contraindications
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Abdominal distensions
Adrenal exhaustion
Anemia
Aneurysm
Carcinomas
• Colon
• Cardiac conditions
• Uncontrolled blood
pressure
• Hypertension
• Hypotension
• Congestive heart
failure
• Crohn’s
• Colitis
• Diverticulosis
• Diverticulitis
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Fistulas
Fissures
Hemorrhage
Hemorrhoids
Contraindications cont.
• Hernias
• Liver
• Jaundice
• Acute failure
• Cirrhosis
• Lupus
• Perforations
• Intestinal
• Colon
• Sigmoid
• Rectal
• Pregnancy
• First trimester
• Third trimester
• Renal
• One kidney
• Insufficiency
• Dialysis
• Surgery
• Abdominal
• Colon
• Rectum
• Hemorrhoidectomy
Precautions cont.
• Medications
• Coumadin
• Digoxin
• Lasix (furosemide)
• Prednisone
• Lipitor
• ASA/NSAIDS
• Methotrexate
Indications
• FDA
• When medically indicated, such as before
radiological or endoscopic examination
• Practitioners Suggested Benefits (not
listed by FDA)
• Health maintenance
• DETOXIFICATION (correct
imbalance)
• Symptomatic relief
• Constipation
• Indigestion
• Functional bowel problems
Indications cont.
• Benefits (not listed by FDA)
• Assessment of bowel function
• Removal of impacted feces
• Removal of foreign material
• Rehydration of bowel
• Toning of the bowel
• Aids in bowel re-training
• Improved bowel elimination
Indications cont.
• Benefits (not listed by FDA)
• Removal of bowel toxins which may be
a cause of chronic inflammatory disease
processes
• Improved sense of well-being
• Improved immune response
• Aids in bowel cleansing
• Aids in elimination of stored toxins
• Aids in restoring the integrity of the
mucosal lining
• Improvement of quality of life
Summary
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Safe
Relatively Inexpensive ($65)
Licensed Practitioners
Effective (This message not reviewed by the FDA)
So can we advocate this practice as
PA’S?
That answer is as clear as…
Mud
Sources
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