http://ssnces.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/Character+Education
Character Matters in
Transforming Teaching and
Learning
Fay Gore, Section Chief, K-12 Social Studies
Nakisha Floyd, Abstinence Education Consultant, NC Healthy Schools
Why Character Matters
“Great learning and superior abilities will be of little value...unless
virtue, truth and integrity are added to them.”
Abigail Adams
"Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education"
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.
“Effective character education is not adding a program or set of
programs to a school. Rather it is a transformation of the culture and
life of the school.”
Dr. Marvin Berkowitz
World in Crisis …
Lance Armstrong & Doping Chargers
Jerry Sandusky & Penn State scandal
Sandy Hook & other victims of gun violence
Corrupt Politicians
Wall Street greed
Reality TV
Bullying
Drug & alcohol abuse
Student Preparation
 College
 Career
 Civic Life
Character Education is
the Plate!
Common Core
Evaluations
Accountability
Parent &
Essential
Standards Community
Involvement
Legislation
Discipline
Student Performance
What is Character Education?
Character education is the deliberate
effort to help people understand, care
about, and act upon core ethical values.
• Intentional and comprehensive
• Integrated throughout every aspect of the school day
• Provides long-term solutions to address moral, ethical, and
academic issues i.e. absenteeism, teen pregnancy, gang
violence, drug abuse, poor academic performance
Benefits of Character
Education
•
Brings Schools and Communities together
•
Improving school and classroom climate
•
Creating safer (Safe & Drug Free) and more caring schools
•
Closing the achievement gap
•
Academic achievement for all
•
Academic integrity
•
Professional ethics
•
Health and physical education
•
Service to others
•
Community building and commitment
How can we begin to restore a culture of
character, leadership, & service in schools?
 Use a framework for changing school culture
o Legislation
o The 3 c’s: Community, Climate, & Curriculum
o Character Education Partnership’s 11 Principles

Provide students the opportunity to lead and serve
o NCDPI
o Guilford County Schools
o Cotswold Elementary
o National Youth Leadership Council
STUDENT CITIZEN ACT OF 2001
In the fall of 2001, the North Carolina State Legislature
passed the Student Citizen Act of 2001 (SL 2001-363).
 This Act requires every local board of education to
develop and implement character education instruction
with input from the local community.
 With the passage of this Act, the state of North Carolina
has affirmed that the development of character in our
children is the cornerstone of education.
Character Education
Character Traits (from legislation)
– Courage
– Good judgment
– Integrity
– Kindness
– Perseverance
– Respect
– Responsibility
– Self-discipline
Character Education
Other elements:
1. Respect for school personnel—holding teachers, administrators, and all school
personnel in high esteem and demonstrating in words and deeds that all school
personnel
deserve to be treated with courtesy and proper deference.
2. Responsibility for school safety—helping to create a harmonious school
atmosphere
that is free from threats, weapons, and violent or disruptive behavior; cultivating an
orderly
learning environment in which students and school personnel feel safe and secure; and
encouraging the resolution of conflicts and disagreements through peaceful means
including
peer mediation.
What Do Successful NC State
Schools Of Character Have?
The Model
• Community refers to the process of building consensus and
sustaining community involvement in the shared responsibility of
developing character and active citizenship in young people.
• Climate incorporates multiple factors that affect the school
environment, such as personal relationships, leadership, discipline,
sense of community, safety, civic involvement and democratic
leadership.
• Curriculum includes strategies and resource materials for
integrating elements of character into the entire school curriculum
and for strengthening the civics curriculum. Service learning is
suggested as a highly successful strategy for both character and
citizenship development.
Service Learning, Health & Other Content Areas
Healthy Lives, Healthy Choices
English/Language
Arts
Social
Studies/History
Foreign
Languages
The Arts
Examine how
marketing has been
used to promote
smoking cigarettes
and to stop people
from smoking
Interview elders
to find out how
popular diets
have changed
since their
childhoods
Examine how
language barriers
interfere with
healthcare in
developing
countries and
among immigrant
populations
Use photography
to capture images
of community
health
Read recipes in
different
languages and
learn about the
food ingredients
from various
cultures
Create
dramatizations of
challenging
situations with “what
would you do?”
moments, and
include examples of
healthy responses
Read a book or
Compare global
novel and look at
diets and
the choice made by lifespan
the characters that
contributed to their
well-being
Source: The Complete Guide to Service
Learning (Kaye, 2010)
Service Learning, Health & Other Content Areas
Math
Physical
Education
Computer
Science
Find statistics
regarding the
reaction time of
braking in a
vehicle while
under the
influence of drugs
and alcohol
Interview athletes
for information
about how food
choices and
exercise can build
strength and
endurance
Research how
increased
computer use
(video games,
social networking,
etc.) impacts
young people’s
health
Find out how
weather can affect
the health of
people living with
conditions like
asthma
Compare health
care costs in rural,
suburban and
urban
communities
Use pedometers
and chart physical
activity of
students in a
class
Design screen
savers with
positive
messages about
healthy choices
and distribute to
students and the
community
Learn what blood
pressure is and
how to check it
Source: The Complete Guide to Service
Learning (Kaye, 2010)
 The KEY to a successful school
Character Education program is to
follow the “The 11 Principles of
Effective Character Education”
 Each principle outlines criteria that
should be considered when
developing an effective program.
 “The 11 Principles of Effective
Character Education” offer the
primary guidance for successful
implementation and outcomes.
What is quality character education?
Effective character education:
1. Principle 1: Promotes core ethical values.
2. Principle 2: Defines “character” comprehensively to include
thinking, feeling, and behavior.
3. Principle 3: Uses a comprehensive, intentional, and
proactive approach.
What does a school with quality
character education look like?
4. Principle 4: Creates a caring school community.
5. Principle 5: Provides opportunities for moral action (service
learning).
6. Principle 6: Includes a meaningful and challenging academic
curriculum that meets the needs of all learners (performance
character).
7. Principle 7: Fosters students’ self-motivation.
Who should be involved in
character education?
8. Principle 8: Engages the school staff as a learning and moral
community.
9. Principle 9: Fosters shared moral leadership and long-range
support.
10.Principle 10: Engages families and community members as
partners.
How are we doing?
Where do we go from here?
Assessment should guide the process!
11. Principle 11: Evaluates the character education
initiative.
2012 NCDPI Student
Leadership Institute
I Am…
Character, Leadership and
Service
Title V Abstinence Education and Social Studies Partnership
Title V: Abstinence Education
• $1.7 million federal grant from ACF, USDHHS
• 19 high need counties receive sub-awards
• Students in grades 4, 5 and 6
• NC AEGP project focus
– Mental and Behavioral Health
– Health Services
– Health Education
– Parental and Community Involvement
Social Studies Education
• Inherited Character Education in 2009
• Small appropriations from the NC General Assembly
• 115 LEAs plus Charter Schools (8 State Board
Districts)
• Students in grades K-12
• Curriculum Focus
– Citizenship Education
– Service Learning
Service Learning
Service-Learning is a pedagogy that connects meaningful community service
experiences with academic learning, personal growth, and civic responsibility.
Service-learning goes beyond extracurricular community service because it
involves participants in reading, reflection and analysis; provides students an
opportunity to develop a personal connection to what they are learning;
and creates a context for the application of concepts introduced in the
classroom.
Benefits:
•
It enhances the educational goals of the curriculum through experiential learning and
critical reflection.
•
It helps students develop the skills and virtues required for full participation and
leadership in their democratic communities.
•
It serves the public good by providing a needed service to individuals, organization,
schools, or other entities in the community.
…What the Research Says…
Service Learning &
40 Developmental Assets
• External
• Community Values Youth
• Youth as Resources
• Service to Others
• Positive Peer Influence
• High Expectations
• Creative Activities
• Youth Programs
Source: http://www.search-institute.org
Service Learning &
40 Developmental Assets
• Internal
• Achievement Motivation
• Bonding to School
• Homework
• Reading for Pleasure
• Caring
• Equality and Social Justice
• Integrity
• Honesty
• Responsibility
• Planning and Decision
Making
• Interpersonal Competence
• Cultural Competence
• Resistance Skills
• Peaceful Conflict Resolution
• Personal Power
• Self-Esteem
• Sense of Purpose
• Positive View of Personal
Future
• Restraint
Source: http://www.search-institute.org
The Benefits of Service
Learning
•
Civic Responsibility
– Increase awareness of community needs
– Relate to culturally diverse groups
– Feel they can make a difference
•
Academic Learning
– Improved grades including test scores
– Improved grade point averages
– Improved problem-solving skills
– Increased interest in academics
– Increased student attendance
Source: Research on k-12 School-Based Service Learning (S.H. Billig)
Service Learning & Healthy Outcomes
• Personal and Social Development
– Increase measures of personal and social responsibility
– Increased self-esteem and self-efficacy
– Less likely to engage in “risk” behaviors
– Less likely to be referred for disciplinary measures
– Less likely to engage in behaviors that lead to pregnancy or arrest
• School Environment/Climate
– Improves overall school climate
Source: Research on k-12 School-Based Service Learning (S.H. Billig)
2012 NCDPI Student Leadership Institute
• Two and a half day residential program
– June 27th through June 29th
• William Peace University
• 16 Teams of Students with Adult Advisors
– 7 Elementary
– 6 Middle School
– 3 High School
– 84 total
2012 SLI TEAMS
REGION 5
PIEDMONT TRIAD/ CENTRAL
REGION 7
NORTHWEST
Efland Cheecks
Erwin Montessori
Mineral Springs Middle
Penn-Griffith High
Snow Creek Elementary
REGION 3
NORTH CENTRAL
REGION 1
NORTHEAST
Moore Square Museum
Magnet
Rocky Mount
Preparatory
Southeast Halifax
North Johnston High
Lakeforest
Elementary
First Flight Middle
Alleghany
Ashe
Watauga
Surry
Yancey
Alexander
Haywood
Buncombe
Jackson
Graham
Macon
Cherokee
Orange
Guilford
Alamance
Henderson
Polk
Hertford
Catawba
Cleveland Gaston
Edgecombe
Chatham
Martin
Wilson
Rowan
Pitt
Lee
Cabarrus
Stanly
Mecklenburg
Transylvania
Bertie
Nash
Wake
Randolph
Rutherford
Gates
Warren
Franklin
Durham
Davidson
Lincoln
Swain
Vance
Granville
Forsyth
Davie
Iredell
Burke
McDowell
Northampton
Person
Halifax
Yadkin
Caldwell
Rockingham Caswell
Wilkes
Mitchell Avery
Madison
Stokes
Johnston
Harnett
WashingtonTyrrell
Dare
Beaufort
Greene
Hyde
Wayne
Moore
Montgomery
Lenoir
Craven
Pamlico
Clay
Union
Anson
Richmond
Hoke
Cumberland
Sampson
Jones
Duplin
Scotland
Onslow
Robeson
Carteret
Bladen
Pender
REGION 8
WESTERN
REGION 6
SOUTHWEST
Lincoln Charter Elementary
Concord Middle
REGION 4 Columbus
SANDHILLS/
SOUTHCENTRAL
Cameron Elementary
Hoke County High
New
Hanover
Brunswick
REGION 2
SOUTHEAST
Penderlea
Elementary
Southwest Middle
The Experience
• Team Building Session
– Leading To Change (Charlotte, NC)
• Elementary Teams
– Training in Service Learning, Leadership and Character Development
– Service Learning Project Planning with Centennial Middle School (Raleigh, NC)
Leadership Staff
– Experiential Learning Experience at the Alice Aycock Poe Center for Health
Education (Raleigh)
• Middle High School Teams
– Training in Service Learning, Leadership and Character Development
– Service Learning Project Planning with Guilford County Schools Character
Education Staff
– Guest Speaker, Marty Wiggins, Environmental Education Consultant
– Experiential Learning Experience at Lake Crabtree (Raleigh)
2012 SLI Resources
2012 SLI Testimonials
• “The students absolutely loved the leaders from
Leading To Change! They had a lot of fun moving
around and participating in the activities. They were
activities that the students have been able to share
with their peers in the classroom as well.”
• [Teambuilding Session with Leading To Change]
“Really pushes our kids out of their comfort zone
which was great!”
• “The kids were on fire, and didn’t want to stop!”
Quotes from 2012 SLI Evaluation Survey
2012 SLI Testimonials
• “NCDPI SLI Team provided wonderful resources!”
• The Poe Center: “This was such a wonderful learning
opportunity for the kids as well as myself! So many
hands on experiences for them – I really think they
took a lot away from that trip.”
• “The stop by Durham (the American Tobacco District)
was good.”
• “I love that the students were able to participate in
creating and leading the closing ceremony.”
Quotes from 2012 SLI Evaluation Survey
The 2012 SLI Experience
2012 SLI Outcome
• Create A Service Learning Project
–
Elementary Teams had to create a health-related project or show the health link
• Service Learning Project Focus
–
Raising money through exercise (walk-a-thon/bike-a-thon) to start and fund a school “Back
Pack Buddies” program
•
Fighting Hunger
–
Bullying
–
Improving school environment through wellness
–
Planning and planting a school garden
–
Environmental Awareness and recycling
–
Providing support to youth battling life-threatening illnesses
2013 SLI
• June 23 – 26
• William Peace University
• Veteran Cohort and Beginner Cohort
• Focus: Building Capacity in Student
Leadership, Service and Character
Development.
State/National School/District
of Character
Brenda Elliott
Executive Director of Student Services
Project Manager for Character Development Initiative
[email protected]
Yvonne Foster
Coordinator of Character Development & Service-Learning
[email protected]
State/National School/District
of Character
Cotswold Elementary
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
Alicia Giles Hash
Principal
[email protected]
Mary Hook
Coordinator for Character Education
[email protected]
How Do You Know If Your
Character Education Program
Is Working?
Observable Behaviors:
 Do students demonstrate that they know right from
wrong?
 Do students’ actions show a respect for others?
 Do students work well cooperatively?
 Do students influence others in a positive way
 Is the school becoming a more caring community?
 Is the entire school staff working on being a
positive role model and friend to students?
How Do You Know If Your
Character Education Program
Is Working?
Collect Definitive Information:
Attendance data
Suspension data
Data on specific behaviors
 i.e., fighting, bullying, cutting class, d-hall participation, etc.
Communication logs
 i.e., parent/community involvement, school/community
collaboration, school program agendas and bulletins, etc.
“Nothing is more important to the public
weal [well-being] than to form and train up
youth in wisdom and virtue.”
--Benjamin Franklin
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