Examining translocal discourses:
Mobility, literacies and cultural
practices
Carmen L. Medina
Assistant Professor
SLED
October 2, 2015
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Alternative Title
The story of how the very long journey of
publishing an article can actually become
a positive experience.
“Don’t give up!”
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
New Challenges for Researchers:
(Blommaert & Van der Donkt, 2002)
• world systems, flows, scales, networks, the
global economy, etc. are crucial to
understanding the work researchers do in
interpreting cultural dynamics and identity
politics where it becomes important to arrive at
an understanding of local sociocultural
processes in which connections between the
local and global (or at least translocal) are
empirically sustained, not just posited, as part of
a larger attempt at understanding such
processes as situated—hence, possibly
influenced by—larger ones (p. 138).
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Translocality
(Based on Appadurai, 1996 & 1999)
• …is defines ad “not just in relation to places, but
instead is an abstract (yet daily manifest) space
occupied by the sum of linkages and
connections between places (media, travel,
labor, import/export, etc.). The notion of locality
is included within the term in order to suggest a
situatedness, but a situatedness which is never
static. Translocality can be theorized as a mode,
one which pertains not to how peoples and
cultures exist in places, but rather how they
move through them” (Mandaville, 2006, para. 2).
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Translocality in literacy practices
• Street (2003) any encounter between local and
global results new hybrid literacies that are
neither local nor global.
• Lewis and del Valle (2008) describe a third wave
of research on literacy practices and identity as
hybrid, meta-discursive and spatial.
– Guerra, Moje, & Orellana among others in
(Lewis, Enciso & Moje, 2007) & Leander
(2001).
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Learning as movement
(Gutierrez, 2008)
what it means to learn in familiar, new, and
overlapping contexts, in rapidly shifting practices
and communities, to understand how the social
organization of these environments facilitates or
interferes with cognitive work, including how
people are made smart by the use of artifacts
and participation in particular social groups and
settings... (p. 150)
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
New Challenges for Literacy
Researchers
• To find frameworks to understand how the
epistemic knowledge produced as people move
around and across communities affords the
possibility of rethinking literacy practices situated
within the context of students’ complex cultural
understandings, negotiations and productions in
the emergent space between global and local
discourses and the new identities that are
formed within these spaces?
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Texts that do not travel well
Blommaert’s (2008) argument on texts and
constrained mobility, texts are often only locally
meaningful and valuable. As soon they move to
other geographical and/or social spaces, they
lose ‘voice’ (p. 7). These issues related to texts,
voice and social spaces have implications on
school participation of students from nonmainstream backgrounds and how we perceive
the complex dynamics between local and global
literacies.
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Sc h oo l
li terac ies
New
li terac ies
in lo ca l
co mm .
Immi g rat ion
peop le Õs
m o v e across
locat io n s
New
m ed ia
dom .
Li terac ies in
Mo v e m e n t
G loba l
m ed ia
L ocal
co mm unities
S itua ted
lo ca l
m ed ia
C o mm .
li terac ies
Sc h oo l
li terac ies
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Sc h oo l
li terac ies
Immi gra n t chi ldre n in th e U S ( _____ _)
Pre -ser v ice teac h ers in P .R.( _______ _)
C h il dre n in P .R.
_______________
F lo w
--- --- -- In terrup ted fl o w
New
li terac ies
in lo ca l
co mm .
Immi g rat ion
peo p le Õs
m o v e across
locat io n s
New
m ed ia
dom .
Li terac ies in
Mo v e m e n t
G loba l
m ed ia
L ocal
co mm unities
(local
lan g ua g es)
S itua ted
lo ca l
m ed ia
C o mm .
li terac ies
Sc h oo l
li terac ies
Exploring translocal literacies in
immigrant children literary
discourses
Examining translocal discourses
Story # 4: El chupacabra/The goat sucker
Stanza #1: Emerging stories from media
Juan:
Juan:
80. pero como se llama
80. but how do you call it
81. verdad que también en las
81. it is true that also in the
noticias donde está el Primer Impacto
Primer Impacto news show
82. también salió un hombre que
82. they also showed a man who was
lo había chupado el vampiro.
sucked by the vampire.
Yolanda:
Yolanda:
83. No era [la]
83. No it was [the]
Diego:
Diego:
84. [El Chupacabra]
84. [The goatsucker]
Yolanda:
Yolanda:
85. ¡Andale!
85. Come on!
Stanza #2: Resituating the story as personal experience and media
Carmen:
Carmen:
86. ¿Pero también ustedes
86. But do you also
conocen al chupacabra?
know the chupacabra?
Diego:
Diego:
87. Oh sí!
87. Oh yes!
October 2, 2015
Examining translocal discourses
Juan:
88. y el hombre se puso todo morado
89. y ya tenía colmillos.
Yolanda
90. Dice mi papá
91. que allá en la de donde nosotros somos
allá anduvo el chupacabra y
92. anduvo matando animales.
Diego:
93. También en el Salvador andaba
Yolanda:
94. y en las noticias dice una señora
que mataba a los pollos
95. y los ponía así en orden.
October 2, 2015
Juan:
88. and the man turned all purple
89. and had canine teeth.
Yolanda:
90. My dad says
91. that there where we are from
there was the chupacabra and
92. it was killing animals.
Diego:
93. It was also in El Salvador
Yolanda:
94. and in the news a woman said
that it was killing chickens
95. and it was putting them like this
in order.
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
[Nuestras historias] no tienen nada que ver con… Porque el inglés es como lo
entiende Ms. [the teacher] y esto es muy diferente. [Our stories] have nothing to do
with Because English is like how Ms. [the teacher] understands it and this is very different.
Yolanda: Porque mire, nosotros le decimos a estos [nosotros] pero los otros no lo
comprenden. Ellos puede ser que no han visto esas personas. Look, because we tell it
among ourselves but the others do not understand it. It could be that they haven’t seen
these people.
Juan:
Ay, y despues dicen que no es verdad. Ay, and then they say it is not true.
Yolanda: Que nosotros estamos locos y todo eso. That we are crazy and all that.
[Conversation continues]
Ivonne:
A mi me gustaria enseñrlas …. I would like to teach it to the...
Yolanda: A los gringos como dicen. To the gringos like is said.
Ivonne:
Aha
Carmen: ¿Por qué? Why?
Ivonne:
Porque como ellos casi no han vivido cosas así como en México co que según los
fantasmas y todo eso no han vivido. Because they have not lived things like in Mexico as if
the ghosts and all that, they have not lived this.
Juan:
Porque aquí los fantasmas se mueren. Porque aquí celebran el día de Halloween y
allá celebran el Día de Muertos y siempre van a la tumba a dejarles sus [gesture]sus a los
muertitos. Because here ghosts die. Because here they celebrate Halloween and there they
celebrate Día de Muertos and they always go to the grave to leave their [gesture] to the little
death people.
Ivonne:
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Ivonne: Mi mamá siempre dice que hay que tenerle mas miedo a los que
estan vivos que a los que estan muertos. Porque los que estan muertos
no te pueden hacer nada. Los vivos si. My mom always say that we have
to be more scare of those alive than those dead. Because those who are
dead can’t do anything to you. Those alive they can [do something to
you].
Diego:
Asi dice mi abuela. Que mi abuela no le tiene miedo a los muertos
nada mas que a los vivos. My grandmother says that. That my
grandmother is not afraid of the death only of those alive.
Carmen: Y ustedes piensan que ellos a lo mejor tienen sus historias? And
don’t you think that perhaps they have their own stories?
Francisco: Si. Yes.
Yolanda:
Mi abuelita tiene muchas cosas así porque ella se casó con
tres hombres y todos sus esposos se murieron y ella… My grandmother
has lots of things like that because she got married to three men and all
of her husbands died and she…
Francisco:
Asi es la Mariana de la Noche. That’s how the Mariana de la
Noche is.
Inquiries into Critical and Culturally Responsive Pedagogies with/for Pre-Service
Teachers in Puerto Rico
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
Video games, this one was also...I believe that...it was video games, the
daily routine, how she organizes her daily routine. She has a time for
this and a time for this other, time to play either outside or inside the
house, how they study, how the kids go to school. Then like it is true
inquiring about the popular culture when I finalized the funds of
knowledge () the theme of video games, automobiles, car repairing all
of this is connected too to the kid who watches video games about
cars. Like all the images no, those literacies are also all the time in the
home like at the end of the assignment I realized that everything is
weaving like the popular culture to the literacy practices that they have
in the home because basically the books they read are from the
internet they also have to read magazines that have something to do
with the video games, how to move from one level to the next one or
things like that.
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
... I thought that literacy had to do only with letters... (Ivonne, written
reflection April, 2008)
...like how popular culture influences, because today to send text
messages many times it is done using codes and not through
sentences and many times the children ( ) write a, write
something and they begin to write for example a letter with codes
and they tend to omit what makes a complete sentence, the
verbs, everything that makes up a sentence, they tend to omit
it. Like that popular culture, the present, influences in everyday
life including education. (Focus group I)
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
...because you know that the idea exists that if you allow the kids to write
like in Messenger, they will continue to write everything like in
Messenger. That was a bit of the concern that you brought, that later
when they have to write a letter eh...
/(overlappping speech inaudible)/
/that's a valid concern/
/they wouldn't have the format/
/they wouldn't be able to write in the conventional way/
/but professor/
that is a valid concern because if I, you know, I allow my students to
write all the time that way, then if I ( ) I am going to be worried if later in
a task I asked them, like, look, write something for me, they will write for
me that way. I'm going to be worried because then they don't know how
to change to what you say to an addressee.
Aha
then what is the then how do you get here to a to a happy medium
Examining translocal discourses
October 2, 2015
/I believe/
/If you want to call it that /
I believe that, that when you are chatting it's something you do in leisure
time. While they are in school you are not always writing everything, if it is
the case that we use the chalkboard, you don't write, you abbreviate
things. What I'm saying is that for me, for example, I was always told in
school not to abbreviate anything
and /me/
Like I sometimes say that it is possible that affects you when you are writing
composing an essay but to get to the point of changing conventional writing
for signs and abbreviations I'm not really in agreement with that.
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