Tendencias globales para Reducir, Reutilizar,
Reciclar y REP - direcciones de las
políticas públicas y respuesta de la industria
What this presentation will cover
 A little about Reclay StewardEdge
 Why waste management has become a global issue
 How this is affecting government policy and legislation
 Brief summaries of key global examples
 Perspective on the Chile law project
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About Reclay Group
 Founded in 2002
 Headquartered in Cologne, Germany
 280 employees worldwide
 Turnover: 170 Million EUR in 2012 (115 billion CLP)
 Since 2012 majority shareholder of Reclay StewardEdge, Toronto,
Canada
 Subsidiaries/offices in Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland,
Slovakia, Slovenia, and Switzerland
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Our expertise
 Extensive experience designing, implementing and operating recovery and
recycling programs for used products and packaging. This includes:
o Designing effective policy frameworks reflecting local conditions
o Establishing mechanisms for effective implementation of packaging and
product recycling programs
o Partnering with key stakeholders to successfully manage industry
schemes from program design to material trading
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Reclay Group Consulting
& Program Experience
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2 billion New Urban Residents by 2030,
3 Billion by 2050
Reference: World Urbanization Prospects, 2011 Revision (United Nations, 2012)
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Cities are adding 1,500,000 Residents
each Week
Shenzen in 1987
Shenzen today
Reference: WHAT A WASTE: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT, World Bank, 2012
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Global Peak Waste Likely not Before 2100 Enormous Growth is Coming
Reference: WHAT A WASTE: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT, World Bank, 2012
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Waste management costs are increasing
Biggest proportional
increase in low (and
low-middle) income
nations
Total now = $205 billion
Total in 2025 = $376
billion
Reference: WHAT A WASTE: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT, World Bank, 2012
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Search for “Global Solutions” is on
Waste management has become a global problem
 Six “big ideas” for accelerating reduction, reuse & recycling
1. Promote “best practices”
2. Green taxes
3. Tradable credits
4. Collaborative consumption
5. Circular economy
6. Extended Producer Responsibility
Common objective to scale up perceived 3Rs best practices
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Collaborative Consumption
Access to goods and skills without ownership
 Product-service systems for sharing or renting of a product
 Redistribution markets, which enable the sale and reuse of a product
 Collaborative lifestyles in which assets and skills can be shared
Lower costs, less waste, and community building
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Credit: City of Melbourne
Credit: City of Melbourne
Credit: City of Melbourne
Credit: City of Melbourne
Circular Economy Framework
Embodies Different
Sustainability Concepts &
Philosophies
Enables Different Tools &
Mechanisms
The Circular Economy
The Circular Economy
Closed
Loop
Natural
Economy
Cradleto-Cradle
Resource
Efficiency
Industrial
Ecology
Voluntary
Industry
Initiatives
Informal
Sector
Landfill
Bans
Deposit
Laws
EPR
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The Circular Economy
Reference: Towards the Circular Economy – McKinsey & Company for The Ellen MacArthur Foundation
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Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR)
Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) is,
according to OECD (2001), an environmental
policy approach in which a producer's
responsibility, physical and/or financial, for a
product is extended to the post-consumer stage
of a product's life cycle. A wide range of EPR
models have been implemented globally.
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Used Packaging
Management Initiatives
1990
V
Beverage Container Deposit Legislation
No Waste Packaging or Product Stewardship
Legislation
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V
?
?
?
V
V
?
V
V
V
V
v
Container Packaging Taxes
Used Packaging
Management Initiatives
2000
Beverage Container Deposit Legislation
Packaging Waste Legislation & Product Stewardship
in Place
V
Industry-led Voluntary Recycling
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?
?
?
?
Used Packaging
Management Initiatives
2013
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Proposed/Expected
Packaging Waste Legislation &
Product Stewardship in Place
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Country Performance: Overall Recycling Quotas in 2009(%)
Denmark
Belgium
Netherlands
Germany
Czech Rep.
Austria
Ireland
Italy
UK
Luxembourg
Spain
Portugal
Sw eden
Slovakia
Lithuania
Estonia
France
Finland
Hungary
Slovenia
Bulgaria
Latvia
Greece
Cyprus
Romania
Poland
Malta
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
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Typical Recycling Model Operated in Europe
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Funcionamiento del Sistema Integrados de Gestión (SIG)
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SIG
EMPRESAS
Aportan una cuota según
los envases que pongan
en el mercado
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Recauda
Y Administra
Nuevos envases
y/o productos
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Reciclado
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El SIG paga el coste
adicional de la recogida
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selectiva y apoya las
acciones de sensibilización
Las entidades localeshacia los ciudadanos
pueden adherirse a los
Convenio directo
Convenios Marco
firmados con CC.AA.
por tipo de material
Recogida selectiva
A cargo de las entidades
locales
En CC.AA.
donde esté
autorizado el
SIG
CC.AA.
Convenios Marco
Planta de selección
Valorización
energética
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Los ciudadanos separan en el
hogar y depositan los residuos
en contenedores específicos
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ENTIDADES LOCALES
Convenios de Colaboración
EPR Programs in Canada
see
inset
full-colour symbols =
program in place or
pending
white-washed symbols
= program proposed or
under consideration
2012 Status
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Case Study Ontario
 900,000 square kms.
 12.7M population
 4.4M households
 500 municipalities
• Organized into 120 regional
recycling programs
 95% of single family homes with recycling services
 ~25% of multi-family units served
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Ontario’s Blue Box Program Plan (BBPP)
 Brand Owners & first importers are “producers”
 Producers fund 50% approved net cost of municipal residential Blue Box
programs
• Shared responsibility approach
 Blue Box Waste defined as:
• Glass, metal, paper, plastic & textiles or
any combination of above
 Producers report on and pay for amount & type of printed paper &
packaging they supply into the market
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Sistemas de Gestión de Envases Post-Consumo
Total Responsabilidad
del Sector Público
Responsabilidad
Compartida
Total Responsabilidad
del Sector Privado
 Manejo Estatal
 Manejo compartido
 Manejo privado
 Financiado a
traves de
impuestos
 Financiación
publico-privada
 Financiado a
traves de
aportes de los
productores
 Servicio público
 Acción conjunta
municipalidadessector privado
 Sistema
independiente
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Sistemas de Gestión de Envases Post-Consumo
Total Responsabilidad
del Sector Público
Responsabilidad
Compartida
 Consumidor paga y
el gobierno maneja
el sistema
 El productor paga
parte del costo total
del sistema
 No incentivos para
mejorar
caracteristicas del
envase por parte del
productor
 El productor y el
consumidor/gobierno
local tienenen el
incentivo de mejorar la
eficiencia del
programa de reciclaje
Total Responsabilidad
del Sector Privado
 Productor paga y es
responsible de la
operación del
sistema
 El productor esta
motivado en realizar
mejoras en el
empaque usado
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The Essence of “EPR”
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What are the Key Drivers of EPR?
 EPR a reflection of broader transition underway
 Quantifying environmental impacts
 Internalizing these costs to producers & users
 Driven by converging forces
 Government systemic financial stress
 Commercial pressures for greater transparency along the supply
chain
 Securing supplies of key strategic materials
 Policy innovation & adoption across the OECD
 Recognition that cradle-to-cradle management essential to
sustainability
 Social license to grow
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La Importancia de los Recolectores de Base
 A nivel mundial millones de recolectores de base retiran manualmente
material reciclable destinado a rellenos:





India: 1.5 millones (2010), en su mayoría mujeres y grupos marginados
Colombia: 18,000 (?) “recicladores”
Uruguay: 15,000 “clasificadores”
Argentina: 42,000 “cartoneros”
Brasil: 229,000 “catadores”
 Realizan la separación del material reciclado que es vendido en los mercados
globales
 Con frecuencia trabajan en condiciones de riesgo
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“¿Puede sentirse orgulloso de esta
cadena de valor?”
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El Reto: Integración de los Recolectores
de Base a la Economía Formal
Antes
Después
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Will the Chile EPR law meet its objectives?
 Should EPR be integrated into comprehensive general waste law?
 Are legislators also prepared to:
 Require households to pay for waste management services?
 Make recycling mandatory?
 Ban priority materials from final disposal?
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Can Chile “de-link” economic growth & waste?
Reference: WHAT A WASTE: A GLOBAL REVIEW OF SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT, World Bank, 2012
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Thank you
Derek Stephenson – President
[email protected]
Tel: 416.594.3459
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