Creative Clasrooms
for an innovative Europe
Lieve Van den Brande, European Commission, DG Education and Culture
Contact: [email protected]
A changing context ... Different skills ?
• We are entering the age of the “Learning
Society” – enabled by a rich, digital
environment, characterised by advances in
social networking.
– 21st century competencies are the main game and
the central focus of learning
– …… and the broader promise of a learning society is
emerging.
2
The new learning generation
changing context – other skills ?
3
Web 2.0
4
The new learning generation
• The 21st century digital learner is increasingly driving the
agenda….. and demanding an 21st century skill set for
life and work
• 21st century competencies are on the front page of
educational reforms in Europe and worldwide:
–
–
–
–
–
OECD DeSeCo / PISA
Partnership for 21st century skills
Assessing and Testing 21st century skills
EU key competencies for LLL
Europe 2020 – ET 2020
5
Different media lead to…
…different skills
Core message
• Digital competences are core future 21st century
skills
• The citizens and workforce of tomorrow are at
this very moment already at school
• New millennium learners may be digital natives
but are not by definition effective learners
• Education has a unique role to play to
teaching/learning the confident, critical and
creative use of ICT
7
The reality – the learners
Technology use is connected to a significant increase in performance
 However, no matching evidence regarding use informal education
Not all pupils have the same approach to technology use
 A second and third digital divide are emerging
New millennium learners may be digital natives
 but are not by definition effective and critical learners
Would the results be different if we could raise school use?
Education has a unique role to play ICT –
The case of e-maturity of schools
Eurydice, 2011
8
PISA – Digital reading (2011)
Addressing underperformance of boys
• Gender gap narrows to two-thirds of a year of schooling based to
differences in navigation skills.
Learn form the informal use of ICT ( at home) – more than ICT skills
• Methods for improving students’ navigation strategies can be
derived from analysing ICT use at home.
• These skills include the ability to critically evaluate the quality and
credibility of available texts, integrate information from multiple texts,
and – crucially – navigate effectively.ICT use at home is positively
related to both navigation skills and self-confidence in completing
high-level ICT tasks.
• Students’ use of ICT at home is usually self-directed and, as a
result, students learn, by experimenting, how to navigate across and
among various pages to achieve their objectives.
9
PISA – Digital reading (2011)
Not too intensive use neither ...
• Intensive users do not perform better in digital reading – and often
perform worse – than moderat users. This is even more pronounced
in mathematics, science and especially in print reading.
• Parents and teachers should both encourage students to use
computers freely, so that they can improve their navigation skills,
and also to provide guidance on balancing time spent using
computers with time for other activities.
Enabling effective use of ICT in schools
• Most puzzling finding : lack of a clear relationship between the
frequency of students’ ICT use at school and performance
• Require a deeper analysis looking beyond the frequency towards
the quality of ICT use at school. Link with innovative methods.
10
The reality – teachers and trainers
Teachers are key intermediairs
Teachers have to be confident,
digital competent and have the
necessary ICT didactic skills
 ICT is pedagogically under-used
 crucial importance of teacher
skills development
Teachers are the best coaches ….
OECD - TALIS,
2010
Eurydice, 2011
11
The reality – institution
Whole school ICT integration
and leadership matter
ICT integration = key to
changing practices
Education has a unique role to play in systemic use of
ICT for learning
12
Key data on learning and innovation
through ICT at School in Europe
•
ICT ARE PLAYING A CENTRAL ROLE IN COOPERATION
BETWEEN SCHOOLS AND THE COMMUNITY AND TO ENGAGE
PARENTS IN THE LEARNING PROCESS
•
ICT IS WIDELY PROMOTED BY CENTRAL AUTHORITIES AS A
TOOL FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING BUT LARGE
IMPLEMENTATION GAP REMAINS
Eurydice, 2011
•
ICT IS OFTEN RECOMMENDED FOR ASSESSING COMPETENCES
BUT STEERING DOCUMENTS RARELY INDICATE HOW IT SHOULD
BE APPLIED
•
TEACHERS USUALLY ACQUIRE ICT TEACHING SKILLS THROUGH
THEIR INITIAL EDUCATION BUT FURTHER PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT IS LESS COMMON
13
ICT and education
 Policy context E&T
14
The European Policy Framework
Key Competences for Lifelong Learning,
2006/962/EC
mother tongue; foreign languages; maths/science/technology;
digital competence, learning to learn; social & civic
competences; entrepreneurship; cultural awareness &
expression
Strategic Framework for
European Cooperation in E&T,
COM(2008) 865
• Lifelong learning and mobility
• Quality & efficiency of E&T
• Equity & active citizenship
• Innovation, creativity, entrepreneurship
Education
SWP: The Use of ICT to
support innovation and
lifelong learning for all, 15
SEC(2008) 2629
ICT cluster under OMC – ET2010
Representatives of 18 Ministries of Education of 18 Member States compiled
key recommendations
It is timely to move away from perceiving ICT
diffusion and usage as a goal and instead see ICT
as an enabler of teaching and learning. It is not
about ICT but about transformation …”
“The ICT cluster has influenced
the development of improved
indicators for measuring ICT
use and impact. This has led to
the first European-wide
comparative study on the use
and impact of ICT in school
education”.
“The cluster has contributed to a
fundamental change in
discourse from accessibility to
innovative learning through the
support of ICT”.
16
Lessons learned by the ICT cluster
Final Report - Learning, Innovation and ICT
Leadership and
institutional
change for a
renewed strategy
on learning
Digital
competences as
core life and
employability
skills
VISION
future!
Towards a new
learning paradigm
Allow more
learner-centred
approaches
Professional
development –
the teacher as
learner at the
centre
17
ICT and education
 EU support
18
EU support
ICT in education and training programmes
Minerva
Socrates
2000-2006
2004-2006
2007-2013
Promote European cooperation in the field of
Open and Distance Learning (ODL) and
Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
in education
Improving the quality and accessibility of European
education and training systems through the
effective use of information and communication
technologies (ICT)
Specific objectives include:
to support the development of innovative ICTbased content, services, pedagogies and
practice for lifelong learning
19
EU support
Comenius: eTwinning for schools
•
Support for online partnerships
between two or more European
primary or secondary schools
•
Flexible, teacher friendly
scheme to mainstream
pedagogical use of ICT and
support professional
development
•
Mainly based on joint
pedagogical projects
•
Increasing use of online
Communities of Practice for
teachers
•
Quality label for good practice
examples
www.etwinning.net
20
Studies at DG EAC
•
•
•
•
Learning 2.0 (IPTS, 2008)
New learning communities through ICT (IPTS, 2009)
Foresight - Future of learning (incl.ICT) (IPTS, 2011)
European-wide comparison of the use and impact of ICT
on school education (STEPS -2009)
• Development of methodologies for ICT indicators (2009)
• Benchmarking study by DG INFSO (2012)
• Key data on Learning and Innovation through the use of
ICT in Europe 2011 (EURIDYCE)
21
EU support
The eLearning Portal
• Supporting the exchange of
ideas, good practice and
resources in elearning
across Europe and the world
• Open to everyone,
everywhere
• Funded by the Lifelong
Learning Programme
eLearning Papers n° 2 (2007)
http://www.elearningpapers.eu/index.php?page=home&vol=2
http://www.elearningeuropa.info
22
ICT and education
 And next …
23
EU Policy context
Lifelong Learning Programme (LLP) contributes to strategies and initiatives:
Europe 2020
ET 2020
Early school leaving
Higher education attainment
Flagships initiatives
Youth on the move
(Sept.2010)
Agenda for new skills
and jobs (Nov.2010)
Making LLL and mobility a reality
E&T quality and efficiency
Equity, social cohesion, active citizenship
Creativity and innovation
24
Priorities under ET 2020
E&T have a unique role to play in enhancing the
use of ICT for learning and should take up a
leadership role.
Actions are oriented around 3 objectives to be
tackled simultaneously:
1. Increasing digital competences
2. ICT and an enhancer of innovation of E&T
3. improving the e-skills of professionals
25
Creative Classrooms
for an innovative Europe
Media and Learning conference
Lieve Van den Brande, DG Education and Culture-A2
Contact: [email protected]
The reality – implementation gap
While ICT is well mainstreamed
outside schools, formal E&T
is only in its early adopter’s stage.
Education can not stay behind these changes in
an increasing networked and digital society.
27
27
What is at stake?
–
+
•
•
•
The infrastructure to
promote ICT
Research base to guide
the process
Bottom-up initiatives
(pilots,research, policies,
action plans, …)
• No systemic integration
and mainstreaming in
formal education
but
28
LACK OF SYTEMIC IMPACT
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Top-down policies not close to users and practitioners
Lack of brokerage mechanisms to policy makers
Lack of evidence-base for policy making
Small scale, grass roots initiatives
Short-term - lack of sustainability/ scalability
No cross-sector dimensions
Whole systems integration and leadership
29
29
Objectives linked to Europe 2020 & ET2020
 Increasing digital competence/ e-literacy
 ICT enhancing innovation of E&T
 Support to Member States to mainstream ICT use in educational
policies and practices
IDEA: Creative Classrooms
30
The term ‘Creative’ =
innovation of learning and
teaching process with the
support of ICT
Creative Classrooms
The term ‘Classrooms’ = all
types of
learning
environments
Focus on what is possible in
today’s practices with today’s
technologies
Creative classrooms
Policy makers /
Decision makers
Theme 1
e.g. Thematic Working
Group
Transfer
Localise
E
V
A
L
U
A
T
I
O
N
Country 1
Country 2
Country 3
Country …
Theme 2
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Country 1
Country 2
Country 3
Case 1
Case 2 Country …
…
Theme …
Case 1
Case 2 Country 1
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2 Country 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2 Country 3
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
…
Case 1
Case 2 Country …
…
Case 1
Case 2
…
32
Lessons learned
The Initiative on Creative Classrooms is
innovative due to:
 its experimental nature
 its transversal scope
 the upscaling of innovations
 making changes systemic and sustainable
 emphasis on European–wide policy development
What ? Creative Classrooms initiative
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Experimentations which are linked up
Based on concrete problems
Whole-system oriented
Providing evidence-based responses
Real-life experimentations in local context
Carried by the users - innovation (bottom-up)
Upscaling of innovations
Leadership top-down (policy makers; key stakeholders)
Emphasis on European-wide cooperation in policy
development
34
34
What ?
• Providing guidance to policy makers and
practitioners
• ‘Learning what works and what does not’ as input
to evidence-based policy making at all levels of E&T
• Linking policy experimentations in real life
settings
• Upscaling across Europe
• Increase impact on systemic level
• Reaching a large number of learners, institutions,
learning centres
• Involving multiple stakeholders (informal, nonformal & formal)
35
35
Transversal issues
• Based on sound research methodologies
• Monitoring and evaluation of the various
experimentations
• Deriving key lessons
• Transferring these lessons to the policy makers
as well as to practice
• Reporting and brokering the lessons
36
36
January
2012
Concept CC
Analysis of
the progress
and gaps
March
2012
Definition of the
optimal conditions
June 2012
Validation of the concept through DEBATE
June 2012
Launch call for
pilots
Testing at a large
2013/ 2014 scale through real
life pilots
2014
2014
Creative
Classrooms
ROADMAP
Developing
a broad
stakeholders
partnership
DEBATE with stakeholders
Drawing lessons from
cases
37
2014
DEBATE with stakeholders
Thank you !
‘Learning and innovation go hand in hand. The arrogance of success is to think
that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow. ’
William Pollard
DG Education and Culture:
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/education_culture/index_en.html
The Lifelong Learning Programme:
http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/static/en/llp/index_en.htm
Contact person: Lieve Van den Brande – DG EAC-A2
[email protected]
Shortages
• Teachers lack pedagogical strategies and experiences to
effectively use ICT
• Professional development of teachers lacks the
pedagogical, innovation and practical dimension
• Assessment of digital literacy is not widespread
• Major lack of systematic impact in practices
• Innovations not enough supported by changes in
pedagogy
• Discrepancy between children’s under-use of ICT at
school and frequent and sophisticated use at home
39
Descargar

www.media-and