Presenters
Christie Lynch Ebert
Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music)
and NCDPI Liaison to the A+ Schools Program
[email protected]
919-807-3856
Slater Mapp
Arts Education Consultant
(Theatre Arts and Visual Arts)
[email protected]
919-807-3758
Arts and the Common Core
•
Participants will:
– Examine connections between the Arts (Dance, Media Arts, Music, Theatre
Arts, and Visual Arts) and the Common Core State Standards for English
Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics
http://ances.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/
Vision for Arts Education
In today’s globally competitive world, innovative
thinking and creativity are essential for all
school children. High quality, standards-based
instruction in the arts develops these skills and
effectively engages, retains, and prepares
future-ready students for graduation and
success in an entrepreneurial economy.
Dance, music, theatre arts, and visual arts,
taught by licensed arts educators and integrated
throughout the curriculum, are critical to North
Carolina’s 21st century education.
S66 Comprehensive Arts Education
• Arts Education
– (arts as core, academic subjects)
• Arts Integration
– (arts as a catalyst for learning across the curriculum)
• Arts Exposure
– (exposure to arts experiences)
Comprehensive Arts Education
•Basic Education Program (§ 115C-81)
The NC Standard Course of Study
Common Core State Standards
NC Essential Standards
NC Standard Course of Study
• Common Core
State Standards
– English Language
Arts (and Literacy in
History/Social
Studies, Science,
and Technical
Subjects)
– Mathematics
• NC Essential Standards
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Arts Education
Career and Technical Education
English Language Development*
Guidance*
Healthful Living (Health & Physical Education)
Information and Technology*
Science
Social Studies
World Languages
Connections
Thumbs’ Up/Thumbs’ Down :
A.
B.
C.
D.
All educators are expected to make connections and integrate
instruction to facilitate student learning.
The arts standards require making connections to other
disciplines.
Many disciplines outside of the arts have objectives which
connect to the arts.
Students who make connections are more likely to develop
conceptual understanding and apply their learning in different
settings.
Common Core Standards
ELA
Math
Standards for
Mathematical Practice
Reading
Writing
K-12
K-12
Speaking
and
Listening
K-12
Language
K-12
K-8:
Priorities for
Fluency and
Conceptual
Understanding
9-12:
- Number and quantity
- Algebra
- Functions
- Modeling
- Geometry
- Statistics and
probability
Common Core and the Arts
• Over-arching connections
Creative Practices
Imagine
Investigate
Construct
Reflect
To form a
mental
image of
concept
To observe
or study
through
exploration
or
examination
To make or
form by
combining
or arranging
parts or
elements
To think
deeply or
carefully
about
Common Core State
Standards for English
Language Arts and
Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science,
and Technical Subjects
What is Literacy?
State Literacy Plan
• Literacy Strategies
in each content area
• Focus on digital
literacy
(Approved by SBE May 2012)
• CCR Anchor
Standards and
CCSS for Literacy
applications:
– each content area,
– specific grade content
requirements,
– 21st Century Skills and Themes
P21 website: http://www.p21.org/
Image Citation 11
Artistic literacy is the knowledge and
understanding required to participate
authentically in the arts.
– Fluency in the language(s) of the arts is the ability to create,
perform/produce/present, respond, and connect through
symbolic and metaphoric forms that are unique to the arts.
– It is embodied in specific philosophical foundations and lifelong
goals that enable an artistically literate person to transfer arts
knowledge, skills, and capacities to other subjects, settings, and
contexts. (January 2013 – National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Framework)
Artistically Literate Citizens
Communication
Creative Personal Realization
Culture, History, and Connections
Means to Well Being
Community Engagement
(January 2013 – National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Framework)
Common Core State Standards for English
Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social
Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects
Watch this video clip
of David Coleman,
one of the CCSS
authors, speaking
passionately about
the arts
Shared Expectation
“The Standards insist that instruction in
reading, writing, speaking, listening, and
language be a shared responsibility
within the school. . . . .”
From the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in
History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, pg. 4
CCSS Standards Supplement
Content Standards
• The intent of the standards is to
supplement, not replace disciplinespecific standards. (CCSS Introduction, Page 3)
English Language Arts Strands
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reading Literature
Reading Informational Text*
Reading Foundational Skills
Writing*
Speaking & Listening
Language
Common Core State Standards for Literacy (Grades 6-12)
Writing
(CCR Anchor
Standards)
Reading
(CCR Anchor Standards)
10 Reading Standards
for Literacy in
History/Social Studies
10 Reading Standards
for Literacy in Science
and Technical Subjects
6-8
6-8
9-10
11-12
9-10
11-12
10 Writing Standards for
Literacy in History/Social
Studies, Science, and
Technical Subjects
6-8
9-10
11-12
Definition of
Technical Subjects
• “A course devoted to a practical study, such as
engineering, technology, design, business, or other
work-force-related subject; a technical aspect of a wider
field of study, such as art or music."
From Appendix A of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts
& Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects, (pg. 43)
CCSS Integrated Model
“Although the Standards are divided into Reading,
Writing, Speaking and Listening, and Language
strands for conceptual clarity, the processes of
communication are closely connected, as
reflected throughout this document.”
Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social
Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Introduction, pg. 4
Communication
Theatre Arts
Music
Visual Arts
Media Arts
Dance
Communication
Arts Literacy and the CCSS
• Each arts education discipline teaches processes that directly
transfer to students’ abilities to read, write, and comprehend
various media:
– texts,
– pictures,
– scripts,
– poems,
– music,
– non-verbal communication, and
– other forms of communication. (NCDPI, 2011)
Research and Media Skills
Students need the ability to:
•
•
•
gather, comprehend, evaluate,
synthesize, and report on information
and ideas
conduct original research in order to
answer questions or solve problems
analyze and create print and non- print
texts in media forms old and new
“The need to conduct research and to produce and consume media is embedded
into every aspect of today’s curriculum.”
(Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects, Introduction, pg. 4)
ELA/Literacy: 3 shifts
1. Building knowledge through content-rich
nonfiction and informational text
2. Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence
from text
3. Regular practice with complex text and its shared
vocabulary
Shift 1:
• Building knowledge through contentrich nonfiction and informational text
Examples:
•
•
•
Music literature, plays, manuscripts, historical documents, etc.
Research/literature about composers, playwrights, artists, dancers
Procedural/technical texts (how to play the guitar, stage maps,
labanotation, graphs, charts, sketches, etc.)
Shift 2:
• Reading, writing, and speaking
grounded in evidence from text
Examples:
•
•
Analyzing and interpreting (through reading, writing, speaking and/or
the art medium): art works, dance, music (heard or viewed), theatre
(seen or read)
Research/literature about dancers, choreographers, composers,
musicians, playwrights, actors, artists
“Forward”
by Jacob Lawrence
Questions
• What is going on in this picture? What do you see that makes
you say that? What more can we find?
• What do you see? What does it mean? How do you know?
• What do you see? What does this work of art make you
wonder? Pose follow up questions that help students think more
deeply about their wonder statements.
– For example, Why does that particular question intrigue you? or What
information can you find in the work of art to help you answer that question?
Where else could we find answers to that question?
Shift 3
• Regular practice with complex text and
its shared vocabulary
Examples:
•
•
•
Use of Tier II and III Vocabulary
Opportunities to re-examine the same work of art (dance, music,
theatre)
Opportunities to examine multiple interpretations of the same piece
Common Core State
Standards for
Mathematics
Mathematics: 3 shifts
1. Focus: Focus strongly where the standards
focus.
2. Coherence: Think across grades, and link to
major topics
3. Rigor: In the major work of the grade, require
fluency, deep understanding, and
application with equal intensity
How to Read the
Grade Level Standards
•
•
•
Standards define what students should understand and be able to do.
Clusters summarize groups of related standards. Note that standards from different clusters
may sometimes be closely related, because mathematics is a connected subject.
Domains are larger groups of related standards. Standards from different domains may
sometimes be closely related.
Standards for Mathematical Practice
1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
them.
2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the
reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
Standards for Mathematical Practice
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated
reasoning.
Activity
• With a partner or small group, look at
the standards for mathematical
practices and discuss ways that the arts
may align with these practices.
Resources
• Arts and the Common Core on the NCDPI
Arts Education Wikispace
• The Arts and the Common Core: A Review of
Connections between the Common Core
State Standards and the Core Arts Standards
Conceptual Framework
(The College Board, New York, NY: December 2012)
• Walk About
Reflections
Evaluation
What
worked well
Suggestions
for improvement
Presenters
Christie Lynch Ebert
Arts Education Consultant (Dance and Music)
and NCDPI Liaison to the A+ Schools Program
[email protected]
919-807-3856
Slater Mapp
Arts Education Consultant
(Theatre Arts and Visual Arts)
[email protected]
919-807-3758
“The digital tools used during the course of this
training have been helpful to some educators
across the state. However, due to the rapidly
changing digital environment, NCDPI does not
represent nor endorse that these tools are the
exclusive digital tools for the purposes outlined
during the training.”
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