Better Governance through Thought and Action
Walk before
you run
A WBI Brown-Bag Lunch Presentation
November 18, 2004
Governance relationships
Traditions
Civil
Society
Values
media
Private
Sector
Government
Cultures
History
Institute On
2
Walk before you run
Government to Citizen Communications
Latvia & 6 Eastern European countries
CIDA & UNDP
Strengthening Social Policy Partnerships
Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines,
Thailand & Canada
CIDA
Institute On
3
Government to Citizen Communications
Institute On
4
Principle
Sound communication between
government and citizens is fundamental
to democracy
Institute On
5
Project objectives
Support healthy two-way flow of
information between government &
citizens by:
assessing current status
identifying challenges & opportunities
making recommendations to governments
Institute On
6
Approach
national and international experts
selected
preparation of research
literature review
interviews with stakeholders
consultations or focus groups
reports & recommendations
sharing of findings among experts
reports submitted to governments
Institute On
7
Participating countries
Estonia
Hungary
Lithuania
Poland
Slovakia
Slovenia
Latvia
Others...
Institute On
8
Common challenges
Democracy is young
Political structure
Citizen distrust/alienation
Civil service evolving
Role of civil society unclear
Constrained resources
Influence of media
Institute On
9
Common opportunities
Priorities require coordination
Desire to improve government/citizen
communications
Outside support
Commitment to change
Youth & energy
Institute On
10
Overview of common
recommendations
Separate political and administrative roles
Create awareness at political & administrative
levels
See communications as a policy tool
Provide adequate resources
Foster central coordination
Encourage networking
Promote direct contact with citizens
Use plain language
Institute On
11
Selected effective practices
Estonia
Government press workers code of ethics
Electronic communications e.g. Public
Internet Access Points
Hungary
Civic initiative: Tele-cottages
Cross-government coordination in early
stages
Institute On
12
Selected effective practices
Latvia
Workshops for Cabinet & senior officials
Approved communications policy
Coordination mechanisms established
Communications integrated into policy
development
Legislation on consultation
Institute On
13
Selected effective practices
Lithuania
Existing communications directives
Communications efforts by Foreign Affairs
re NATO
Poland
 Bulletin of Public Information (BIP)
 ‘Friendly Administration’ program
Institute On
14
Selected effective practices
Slovakia
Regular media analysis
High quality government internet
information
Slovenia
Political will & operational readiness
Signs of increased resourcing
Institute On
15
What next?
Share results and value added
Introduce program elsewhere
Research effective practices
Promote diagnostiques & professional
development on:
importance of government communications
strategic planning & coordination
communications internal to government
for elected and appointed officials
Institute On
16
Walk before you run
Government to Citizen Communications
Latvia & 6 Eastern European countries
CIDA & UNDP
Strengthening Social Policy Partnerships
Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines,
Thailand & Canada
CIDA
Institute On
17
Strengthening Social Policy:
Lessons on Forging Government - Civil
Society Policy Partnerships
Institute On
18
Principle
Policies are stronger, more responsive
and more successful when civil society is
engaged in their development
Institute On
19
Goals, Objectives and Approach of
Project
The Case Studies
Overall Results
Key Lessons Learned
Institute On
20
Goal
More effective government - civil
society policy partnerships
Social policy
Indonesia, Malaysia, the
Philippines, Thailand, Canada
Institute On
21
Key objectives
 Build a network linking civil society
organizations to key policy officials
 Learn how civil society organizations
can affect government decisions, and
 Build more effective state-society policy
partnerships
Institute On
22
Our approach
Local researchers [Jan 2003]
Draft case studies completed [Sept 2003]
Researchers meeting: Bangkok [Oct
2003]
Case studies completed [March 2004]
Regional meeting of government and civil
society representatives: Kuala Lumpur
[June 2004]
Dissemination
Institute On
23
Project partners
Canadian International Development Agency
Indonesia: Dr. Joe Fernandez
Malaysia:Dr. Denison Jayasooria
Philippines: Dr. Francisco Magno
Thailand: Dr. Juree Vichit-Vadakan; Dr.
Kanokkan Anukansai
Canada: Mel Gill, Synergy Associates
Institute On Governance: project leader &
facilitator
Institute On
24
Case study topics
Thailand - prostitution, maternity leave
Indonesia - participation of women in
local government, trafficking of women
Malaysia - children’s rights, women’s
rights, consumer rights
Philippines - indigenous people’s rights,
children’s rights
Canada - children’s rights
Institute On
25
Overall results
Network emerging
Case studies on successful
“partnership” between government
and civil society
Common social issues,
common lessons
Institute On
26
Lessons learned (1)
Understanding partner’s context critical
government context: policy-making process,
decision-making and accountabilities
civil society context: representation,
governance and decision-making
different time-frames and time horizons
Institute On
27
Lessons learned (2)
Importance of leaders and champions
key individuals and relationships crucial to
moving an issue ahead
the right champion can be found or
converted to the cause
Institute On
28
Lessons learned (3)
Structures and processes help
lobbying, public education, advocacy, and
participation in consultations and
demonstrations
role of informal mechanisms
times for collaboration & times for working
separately
Institute On
29
Lessons learned (4)
Progress slow and incremental
Relationships, context can change over time
Know when to push (and not to push) for
more
Institute On
30
Lessons learned (5)
Gap between policy formulation and
implementation
policy impact can be weak because of poor
monitoring, enforcement and
implementation
government needs to create a space to
engage civil society post policy-development
Institute On
31
Other lessons
Timing
Role of media
Influence of international agreements,
organizations
Challenges of collaboration between civil
society organizations
Impact of public attitudes and beliefs
Institute On
32
What next?
Further dissemination
Possible future work:
research on policy implementation,
monitoring and evaluation
building governance capacity of civil society
organizations
exploring representation in civil society
organizations
Institute On
33
Concluding thoughts
Democracy depends on citizens and
governments respecting each other
citizens must understand their role and
hold governments accountable
governments must explain their actions
both have a role in policy development
and implementation
Institute On
34
For More Information
www.iog.ca
Institute On
35
Questions?
Institute On
36
Descargar

No Slide Title