A Classroom as Wide as the World
Vivien Stewart
Senior Advisor for Education
Asia Society
July 30, 2012
A World Transformed
A. The new global context: a changing
world demands changing skills
B. Becoming a global school: global
competence and global citizenship
C. Global connections: the role of the
Jesuit schools network
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A. THE NEW GLOBAL
CONTEXT
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Global context
• 18th-19th century: agricultural age and curriculum
• 19th-20th century: industrial and scientific age and
curriculum
• 21st century: global and digital age
We need to prepare students for the world of tomorrow,
not the world of yesterday; re-envision education for
an increasingly interconnected world
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Global context: economic
• Global trade agreements expanding
rapidly, jobs increasingly tied to exports
• Companies manufacture goods around
the world
• Consumer demand in China and India
affects commodity prices everywhere
• Financial crisis in Europe affects
farmers in Africa or South America
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Global context: environmental
• Production and consumption in some
localities have global consequences
• Actions in many localities creating
global environmental crises eg climate
change, loss of biodiversity, decline of
fisheries
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Global context: Human security
• Diseases spread around the world in
days
• Political issues (eg human rights, arms
control, women’s rights) and
movements cross borders
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Global context: Cultural
• Unprecedented cultural exchange in
arts, food, fashion, music
• Billions receive news from around the
world in seconds via the internet
• Rapid advances in science
• Increased international migration makes
societies multi-cultural and multi-lingual
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The Next Economy is
A Science and Knowledge Economy
- need scientific and technological literacy
A Resource-Challenged Economy
- need critical thinking about sustainable economies
A Globally Interdependent Economy
- global competence is a core competence
A Demographically Diverse Economy
- requires cross-cultural leadership skills
An Innovation-Driven Economy
- requires students who can learn how to learn and adapt to
rapid change
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In the 21st century
students will be:
•
•
•
•
Selling to the world
Buying from the world
Working for international companies
Managing employees from other countries and
cultures
• Competing with people on the other side of the world
for jobs and markets
• Cooperating with people all over the world in joint
ventures and global work teams
• Collaborating to solve international problems such as
AIDS, avian flu, environmental issues, and conflicts
ARE THEY READY?
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B. BECOMING A GLOBAL
SCHOOL
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What is global competence?
• Knowledge of other world regions, cultures and
global/international issues
• Skills in communicating in languages other than their
own, collaborating in cross-cultural environments,
analyzing information from sources around the world
• Values/dispositions including respect and ethical
concern for other peoples and cultures, curiosity,
adaptability
To enable meaningful participation as workers and
citizens in interconnected world
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• Identify an issue, generate
questions, and explain its
significance.
• Use variety of languages, sources
and media to identify and weigh
relevant evidence.
• Analyze, integrate, and synthesize
evidence to construct coherent
responses.
• Develop argument based on
compelling evidence and draws
defensible conclusions.
Global Competence:
CCSSO and Asia Society
Investigate the World
Recognize Perspectives
Students investigate the
world beyond their
immediate environment.
Students recognize their
own and others’
perspectives.
• Recognize and express their
own perspective and identify
influences on that perspective.
• Examine others’ perspectives
and identify what influenced
them.
• Explain the impact of cultural
interactions.
• Articulate how differential
access to knowledge,
technology, and resources
affects quality of life and
perspectives .
Understand the World through
Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Study
• Identify and create opportunities for
personal or collaborative action to
improve conditions.
• Assess options and plan actions
based on evidence and potential for
impact.
• Act, personally or collaboratively, in
creative and ethical ways to
contribute to improvement, and
assess impact of actions taken.
• Reflect on capacity to advocate for
and contribute to improvement.
Take Action
Communicate Ideas
Students translate their
ideas into appropriate
actions to improve
conditions.
Students communicate
their ideas effectively with
diverse audiences.
• Recognize and express how diverse
audiences perceive meaning and
how that affects communication.
• Listen to and communicate
effectively with diverse people.
• Select and use appropriate
technology and media to
communicate with diverse
audiences.
• Reflect on how effective
communication affects
understanding and collaboration in
an interdependent world.
Creating a Global Vision and Culture
• Do your school
mission statement,
graduate profile, and
graduation
requirements focus
on preparing
students for the
interconnected
world of the 21st
century?
Recruiting and Preparing
Internationally-oriented Teachers
• Recruitment
• Universities
• Travel
programs
• School visits
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Transforming
Curriculum and
Instruction by
Integrating International
Content
• Science
• Arts
• Language Arts
Emphasize
Effective
Language
Learning
• Early Start
• Proficiency
• Create opportunities for cultural
interaction
• Develop content-based learning
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Harness Technology
•
•
•
•
Tap global sources
Online courses
Classroom-to-classroom collaborations
Publish on Web
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International Travel and
Partnerships
Resources and Community
Partnerships
• Universities and
colleges
• Businesses
• Cultural groups
GLOBAL CONNECTIONS:THE
ROLE OF THE JESUIT
SCHOOLS NETWORK
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Ten questions you can ask your / all
Jesuit schools
• What are the knowledge, skills and values needed
to function in today’s interconnected world?
• How can the curriculum be strengthened to promote
international knowledge and skills?
• How might your students become more proficient in
world languages?
• How can technology be used to extend the
international experiences of teachers and students?
• What kinds of international exchange could be
organized among your schools?
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Ten questions you can ask your/ all
Jesuit schools
• What professional development opportunities
could be created to give teachers and administrators
more international experiences?
• What partnerships can be created with other
schools. colleges, and international organizations?
• What local ethnic communities/language groups
can be tapped to strengthen global learning?
• What community service opportunities could
promote students’ global understanding and
citizenship?
• How can libraries and informal learning resources
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be harnessed?
Roles for the network
• Develop curriculum resources about each others’
countries
• Joint learning/research projects between students
around the world
• Every school has a partner school
• Joint service projects among schools
• Harness technology to promote communication and
collaboration across cultures
• Broaden teachers international experiences by
visiting other schools
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Going Global: Preparing Our
Students for an Interconnected
World
• Creating a Global Vision and Culture
• Recruiting and Preparing
Internationally-oriented Teachers
• Transforming Curriculum and
Instruction by Integrating
International Content
• Emphasize Language Proficiency
• Expanding Student Experiences through harnessing technology,
international travel and partnerships,
international service learning and
internships
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Expanding Horizons: Building Global
Literacy in Afterschool Programs
•Become Familiar with
Global Literacy
•Take Advantage of the
Afterschool Environment
•Understanding Culture
through Communities
•Involve Youth and Families
•Transform Learning
•Mobilize Staff
•Assemble Expertise and Partners
Creating a Chinese
Language Program
in Your School:
An Introductory
Guide
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Longview Foundation
Resources for Students, Schools and
Teachers
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We live in one world. What we do affects others, and
what others do affects us as never before. To
recognize that we are all members of a world
community and that we all have responsibilities to
each other is not romantic rhetoric, but modern
economic and social reality
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