Tomislav Skračić, MA
Undergraduate English
Course for
MARINE ENGINEERS
1st Semester
Essential reading:
SPINČIĆ, A., An English Textbook For Marine
Engineers I., Pomorski fakultet, Rijeka 2008.
LUZER, J., SPINČIĆ, A., Gramatička vježbenica
engleskog jezika za pomorce, Pomorski
fakultet, Rijeka 2003.
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
KEY WORDS:
chartroom (n.) - navigacijska kabina
m.v.
= motor vessel
chief officer
- prvi časnik
chief mate
- prvi časnik palube
cargo plan
- plan krcanja tereta
Bosun
- vođa palube, noštromo
rating (n.)
- mornar, dočasnik
on board ship - na brodu
cargo ship (AmE freighter)
- teretni brod
general cargo ship
- brod za generalni teret
Liberty replacement
- preinačeni brod tipa Liberty
bow (n.)
- pramac, prova
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
KEY WORDS:
forward
aft
mast (n.)
cargo hatch
opening (n.)
forecastle (n.)
hold (n.)
crane (n.)
derrick (n.)
is igged to work
wire (n.)
main deck (n.)
- sprijeda
- straga
- jarbol
- grotlo za teret
- otvor
- kaštel, pramčano nadgrađe
- štiva, brodsko skladište
- dizalica
- samarica
- pripremljena za rad
- žica
- glavna paluba
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
LESSON 1
General cargo ship
General cargo ship
The cargo holds on
these ships carry almost
any kind of cargo, both
piece goods and bulk
cargo.
The cargo is packed into drums, boxes, bags, bales and
crates or on pallets. The ship is loaded and unloaded using
portside cranes and ship’s derricks that lift the cargo
through the hatches and store it into the holds.
A general cargo ship has several large clear open cargocarrying holds. One or more decks may be present within
the holds. They are known as 'tween decks and they permit
cargo segregation and improved stability.
LESSON 1
General cargo ship
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
QUESTIONS (student A):
1. Who is taking part in the dialogue?
2. Where is the conversation taking place?
3. Who are new ratings? Where are they from?
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
QUESTIONS (student B):
1. What does the Chief Officer ask the Bosun to do?
2. What type of ship is the Sun Dragon?
(employment / design)
3. Mention the main parts of the ship that can be
seen from the bridge when looking forward.
LESSON 1
Talking about the ship - 1
QUESTIONS (student C):
1. What gear is used for loading and discharging a
ship?
2. How many holds is the Sun Dragon provided
with?
3. How are they arranged?
4. How many derricks serve each hold?
The Simple Present
Study these sentences:
Ivan and Ana live in Split.
Where do you live? I live in Omiš.
Where do you work? I work in an office.
Do you like your work? Yes, I do.
Do you have many hobbies? No, I don't.
Ivan lives in Croatia.
He works for the Coast Guard and likes his job.
Where does Ivan live? He lives in Croatia.
Where does he work? He works at a Coast Guard Station.
Does he like his work? Yes, he does.
Does he have many hobbies? No, he doesn't.
The Simple Present – Use
THE SIMPLE PRESENT is used
• when we speak of habits (what we do, for
example, often, sometimes, always, never, every
day etc.) or
• for what is permanent (e.g. what we like, dislike,
love, hate, know, understand; where we live; what
languages we speak etc.).
The Simple Present
LIVE
WATCH
1. I live in Croatia.
I watch TV every day.
2. You live in Croatia.
You watch TV every day.
3. He / She / It lives in Croatia. He / She / It watches TV every day.
1. We live in Croatia.
2. You live in Croatia.
3. They live in Croatia.
We watch TV every day.
You watch TV every day.
They watch TV every day.
NOTE: The ending -s or -es in the 3rd person singular.
The ending –es is used if the verb ends in –s -z -sh -ch -tch, -ge, -o.
EXAMPLES: kiss / kisses; watch / watches; wash / washes;
manage / manages; go / goes; do / does ...
The Simple Present
THE SIMPLE PRESENT QUESTIONS
NOTE:
• Auxiliary verb DO or DOES + main verb (without ending).
You live in Split.
>>>
Marta lives in Split. >>>
Do you live in Split?
Does Marta live in Split?
1. Do I live in Split?
2. Do you live in Split?
3. Does he / she / it live in Split?
Where do I live?
Where do you live?
Where does he / she live?
1. Do we live in Split?
2. Do you live in Split?
3. Do they live in Split?
Where do we live?
Where do you live?
Where do they live?
The Simple Present
THE SIMPLE PRESENT NEGATIONS
NOTE:
• DO NOT or DOES NOT + main verb (without endings)
You live in Split.
>>>
You do not live in Split.
My father lives in Split. >>> My father does not live in Split.
1. I do not watch TV every day.
2. You do not watch TV every day.
3. He / She / It does not watch TV every day.
1. We do not watch TV every day.
2. You do not watch TV every day.
3. They do not watch TV every day.
The Simple Present
THE SIMPLE PRESENT NEGATIONS
NOTE: The short forms don’t and doesn’t in everyday speech.
I do not live in Split. = I don’t live in Split.
You do not know me. = You don’t know me.
My father does not live in Split. = My father doesn’t live in Split.
This engine does not use much fuel. = This engine doesn’t use
much fuel.
Ana does not like soap operas. = Ana doesn’t like soap operas.
We do not watch TV every day. = We don’t watch TV every day.
You do not work as a team.
= You don’t work as a team.
My friends do not speak English. = My friends don’t speak English.
The Simple Present of the verbs BE and HAVE
BE
(am, is, are)
HAVE (have, has)
1. I am a good engineer.
2. You are right.
3. He / She / It is here.
I have a good job.
You have time.
He / She / It has a strong engine.
1. We are Croats.
2. You are Croatian citizens.
3. They are happy.
We have no time.
You have beautiful kids.
They have a house in London.
NEGATIONS:
I am not an engineer. She is not here.
They are not Croatian citizens.
QUESTIONS:
Am I a good engineer? Is she here?
Are you Croatian citizens?
I do not have a good job.
It does not have a strong engine.
Do you have time?
Does it have a strong engine?
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FERROUS AND NON-FERROUS METALS