Research In Computer Science at
Durham University
Hajo Broersma
Director of Postgraduate Research
What exactly does a PhD consist of?
• Essentially, a PhD consists of 3.5-4 years of individual and original
research under the guidance of a (main) supervisor, and culminates in
a written doctoral thesis.
• It is
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hard work
risky
exciting
rewarding.
• It may or may not be the first step on the path to financial rewards; but
doing a PhD does provide significant generic benefits to any individual
in his or her subsequent chosen career path.
• It is essential if you want to start an academic career here or abroad.
• Many students who have successfully completed a PhD think of this as
the best period in their life.
Who should consider a PhD?
• The fundamental qualities any prospective PhD student needs to have
is
– intellectual curiosity,
– a drive for doing original research
and a
– deep interest in (certain aspects of) Computer Science.
• Some talent is required too!
• At times it requires a strong sense of perseverance.
• If you don’t have these qualities then perhaps a PhD may not be right
for you.
What sort of topics can you study?
• The Department of Computer Science has undergone a dramatic
transformation in terms of personnel and its research portfolio.
• Over the past couple of years, 13 new staff have arrived at Durham, all
of whom have exceptional research records.
• There are four research groups that can be found on our web pages:
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Algorithms and Complexity Group
Interactive Media Technology Group
Software Engineering Group
Technology-Enhanced Learning Group
• To find out more, have a look at the web pages and go and have a chat
with appropriate members of staff after this presentation.
Funding
• There are various sources of funding available:
– the Department’s doctoral training account (DTA) arising through
successful EPSRC research grant applications
– Durham University’s postgraduate fellowship scheme
– research grant proposals
– other sources.
• Most sources are competitive.
• It is important that the Department knows of your interest in a PhD as
soon as possible so as to maximise the likelihood of securing funding.
• So start to talk to staff members as soon as possible or follow the
official route of applying through the Graduate School.
• The necessary information and links can be found on our research web
pages.
Research Clusters
– Algorithms and Complexity Group
– Interactive Media Technology Group
– Software Engineering Group
– Technology-Enhanced Learning Group
Algorithms and Complexity Group
Leader: Hajo Broersma
• The Algorithms and Complexity group in Durham (ACiD) is a worldleading research group and the largest UK group in this area of
Theoretical Computer Science.
• All research in ACiD is about the foundations of computers and the
fundamental limitations of computation.
Hajo Broersma
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structural graph theory
algorithmic graph theory
computational complexity
applications, mainly in
telecommunication
Stefan Dantchev
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computational complexity
proof complexity
mathematical logic
integer programming
constraint satisfaction
satisfiability (SAT) solving
Tom Friedetzky
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randomised algorithms
probabilistic analysis
sub-linear time algorithms
Monte Carlo Markov chains
communication networks (in
particular load balancing)
Matthew Johnson
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combinatorics
graph theory, including
factorizations, cycle
decompositions, list colouring,
hypergraphs
applications to dynamic
communications networks
Andrei Krokhin
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algebra
logic
discrete mathematics
constraint satisfaction
computational complexity
temporal reasoning
Daniel Paulusma
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graph theory
graph algorithms
computational complexity
game theory
Iain Stewart
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computational complexity
finite model theory
descriptive complexity
graph theory and algorithms
interconnection networks for parallel
and distributed computing
theoretical aspects of artificial
intelligence
group theory
e-Science
Stefan Szeider
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design and analysis of algorithms
proof complexity
parameterized and exact
computation
propositional satisfiability
graph theory and combinatorics
Interactive Media Technology Group
The Interactive Media Technology group investigates novel technologies
that are changing the way people interact with computers. The aim is to
demonstrate, through rigorous research, how new technology can provide
humans with a better experience and understanding of the information
around them.
Nick Holliman
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digital imaging
3D computer graphics
computer vision
visualisation technologies with a
specific focus on software issues for
advanced display systems
theory and application of autostereoscopic 3D displays
Ioannis Ivrissimtzis
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computer graphics
subdivision surfaces
polygonal mesh encoding
application of statistical learning
methods in surface reconstruction
from scan data
3D computer graphics
Frederick Li
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Computer Graphics
Distributed Virtual Environment
Multimedia Systems
Surface Modeling
Virtual Reality
Shamus Smith
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interaction specification for
interactive systems
design of virtual environments
navigation in virtual environments
tactile visualisation
hazard analysis and safety
arguments
descriptive argument reuse
barrier analysis
Software Engineering Group
Leader: Malcolm Munro
The research activities in the group include:
• exploring how software-based systems evolve and change over time;
• exploring how evidence-based software engineering can influence
software engineering in general;
• developing and exploring new software-service oriented architectures
and their relationships to web services and the semantic web;
• exploring type-based static analysis, resource analysis and verification
for O-O programs;
• exploring how software systems can be visualized;
• developing the Semantic Web, Semantic Grids, and e-Services;
David Budgen
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software engineering
evidence based software
engineering
software service architectures with
particular emphasis upon their use
in health and social care
software design
Keith Gallagher
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software maintenance
software evolution
empirical studies
program slicing
program comprehension
software testing
Malcolm Munro
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software maintenance
software evolution
program comprehension
reverse engineering
software and system visualisation
Shengchao Qin
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formal methods in software
engineering
– specification
– verification
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unifying theories of programming
and method integration
programming languages
– type systems
– program analyses
William Song
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e-commerce and e-payment
web search techniques including
metadata, XML, RDF, web
document and metadata
management, learning object
management
conceptual database schema
integration
requirements engineering
enterprise re-engineering
Technology Enhanced Learning Group
Leader: Liz Burd
• The vision is to advance technology enhanced learning through
research innovation and software development.
• Research aims:
• to explore ways to promote active student engagement in the learning
process.
• to seek new ways in which learning can be supported by technology
but not driven by it.
• to examine the suitability of existing learning environments and
consider how improved design may lead to more effective learning.
• to ascertain how technology can be used to increase effective use of
teaching resources and increase personalisation and flexibility in the
learning process.
Liz Burd
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program comprehension
software maintenance and evolution
software process improvement
software reuse
software engineering
education
Shamus Smith
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interaction specification for
interactive systems
design of virtual environments
navigation in virtual environments
tactile visualisation
hazard analysis and safety
arguments
descriptive argument reuse
barrier analysis
What Next?
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Decide what research area you are most interested in
Contact member of academic staff for further details
Fill in an application form
Submit it through the Graduate School
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