Making connections
-more about the Curriculum Planning and Programming materials
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Evaluating school practices in outcomesbased education: the need for support
Eltis report:
Recommendations in areas of
•Managing curriculum demands
•Assessment and reporting
•Professional development
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Time to Teach – Time to Learn
“
It has long been the practice to leave it to schools to develop
their own teaching programs based on the syllabuses issued
to them. As so many teachers and principals said during the
course of the evaluation: we are all reinventing the wheel.
“The time may well have come when we should re-think our
position on this matter and while taking measures not to
undermine teacher professionalism and independence to
create individual teaching programs, provide more detailed
frameworks to assist the delivery of a school’s teaching
program.”
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Support for schools for implementing the policy
Board of Studies
Foundation Statements
Getting
the balance right
information for K - 6 teachers in
public schools © 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Policy: Curriculum planning and programming,
assessing and reporting to parents K-12
1.1 Curriculum planning and programming
1.1.1 Schools plan curriculum and develop teaching programs which are
consistent with the Education Act and Board of Studies syllabuses and
credentialing requirements.
1.1.2 Curriculum planning and teaching programs will meet the Policy
Standards.
1.1.3 Teachers develop quality teaching programs that are appropriate for
the stage of learning and which address the needs of all students.
1.1.4 Teaching programs will incorporate assessment as an integral
component.
1.1.5 Teaching programs will indicate the outcomes being addressed, the
teaching activities planned and the intended assessment strategies.
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Policy standards – Planning and programming
Years K – 6
Learning programs, based on Board of Studies (BOS) syllabuses, are to be
provided to address each learning area in each year of schooling.
In providing curriculum, schools are to ensure that priority is given to
English and Mathematics in all primary years especially in the early years.
Schools have flexibility in how they deliver learning programs, for
example through integrated programs, provided that:
-approximately 50% of time is allocated for English and Mathematics
and 40 % of time for the other KLAs and sport
-as part of the 40% allocation, schools are to include two hours per
week for planned physical activity, including in Years 3 – 6, a minimum of
one hour for sport
-provision is made for Special Religious Education in each primary year,
where authorised personnel from approved providers are available.
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Website support for schools
http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/index.htm
Curriculum
planning,
programming,
assessing and
reporting to parents
K-12
since December
2005
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
The curriculum planning and
programming framework
provides three levels of support:
Level 1: A curriculum planning framework of connected outcomes groups organises
outcomes from four KLAs connected by a common focus. (This also includes a
poster of all English and Mathematics outcomes)
Level 2: Descriptions of the connected outcome groups which explain the
connection for each KLA in the group, identifies relevant syllabus content and
lists or links to readily-available resources.
Level 3: Units of work, one for each connected outcome group, translate the
framework into programming support. The units of work contain teaching and
learning activities with literacy and numeracy links included, and planned
assessment.
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 1 - Curriculum planning framework
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 1 - Curriculum planning framework:
•
•
•
•
•
overview of the primary curriculum (all outcomes in two documents
for easy reference )
primacy of English and Mathematics
all outcomes are shown and written in full once only (the outcome
code is written when outcomes are revisited)
Connected Outcomes Groups (COGs) are used to organise Science
and Technology, Human Society and Its Environment, Creative Arts
and Personal Development, Health and Physical Education)
Physical education is a separate group to ensure all students
participate in 120 minutes of planned physical activity each week.
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum planning framework
– Connected Outcomes Groups (COGs):
•
natural connections to maximise significant learning opportunities for
students and allow the curriculum to be taught more efficiently
•
all outcomes have been addressed
- adequate repetition across the stage
- outcomes addressed in different contexts (focus KLAs)
•
outcome groups have been tracked across stages in ‘strings’ (e.g.. A = Our
place ES1, Local Places S1, Local Environments S2 and Living Land S3) to
support programming for multi-stage classes and small schools
•
approximately one connected outcome group per term - eight groups per
stage - six smaller groups in Early Stage 1)
•
not all KLAs are addressed in each connected outcomes group but are
covered across a stage
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Curriculum planning framework
How can the framework be used?
• use the framework to develop an odd and
even year scope and sequence
• compare this framework to your current
scope and sequence (to ensure all outcomes and
syllabus content for each KLA are addressed)
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 2 - Connected Outcomes Groups
(COGS) description pages
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 2 - Connected Outcomes Groups
(COGS) description pages :
• are organised around a connection focus or big idea
• describe how the outcomes for each KLA connect
• show how several outcomes can be addressed at the one
time
• identify relevant content from each KLA
• provide examples of literacy and numeracy connections
• link existing resources provided to schools by DET and
Board of Studies (including links to websites)
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Connected Outcomes Groups (COGS)
description pages
How can the COG description pages be used?
• to write a school based unit of work (e.g. gathering
resources listed and local resources to develop learning
experiences)
• to write a multi-staged unit of work (e.g. use and adapt COG
description pages from stages in a ‘string’)
• as an introduction to the unit for teachers where teachers
use the description overview to highlight key ideas and list
teaching ideas and learning experiences
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Exploring COG connections:
10 minutes
1.
2.
Choose the connection description for the stage you are teaching.
Read the connection and use these questions to plan 5 to 10
possible learning experiences or a rich task, focussing on:
–
What do I want the students to learn?
–
What do I want them to produce?
–
How well do I expect them to do it?
–
Why does the learning matter?
3. Record ideas
4. Share to explore links and a continuum of learning across stages
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections:
Level 3 - Units of work
For each unit there is:
•
•
•
-
a cover page that details the connection focus, how content from
each key learning area contributes to the connection focus, sample
learning experiences and examples of planned assessment
a planning page to assist with organisation such as resources,
excursions and student work. The term planner can be used to plan
the weekly sequence of lessons.
a sequence of teaching/learning activities including:
outcomes with indicators to clarify the purpose of each lesson
sample assessment strategies and criteria that link assessment
with teaching and learning
literacy and numeracy links
links to resources and websites
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 3 -Unit of work cover page
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Unit of work planning page
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Level 3 - Units of work learning experiences
The units are detailed examples of learning experiences that have
been developed from the COGs description pages.
The units of work show:
• a sequence of lessons that address outcomes based around the
connection focus
• the depth of knowledge required to address the outcomes for each
key learning area
• assessment that is planned and linked to learning experiences
• the content from each key learning area contributing to the overall
focus
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Units of work
How can the units of work be used?
Teachers can:
- trial and adapt the units to suit the needs
of their students and school community
- select teaching and learning activities from
units for a ‘string’ to create a program for
a multistage class
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Exploring units of work:
20 minutes
1.
In stage groups, read the unit of work and explore how the
learning experiences connect.
2.
Look at the unit in light of quality teaching:
Focus on elements of: deep knowledge, deep understanding,
explicit quality criteria, knowledge integration and
connectedness
3.
Record ideas
4.
Share
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections: COGs in the
classroom
“COGs take the stress out of trying to make sure you
cover each outcome because the units connect
beautifully. Students enjoy working on COGs as it allows
them to get involved in a theme over along period of
time. “ Harrington Street Public School, south western Sydney region
“Many of us at Ryde East feel COGS is the greatest
timesaver presented to teachers for a very long time –
it gives scope and structure and practical ideas,
particularly for those dance and drama strands that
often get lost in the busy curriculum”
Ryde East Public School, northern Sydney region
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections: COGs in the classroom (students)
“COGs make links between curriculum areas and build
on prior knowledge (for students) to gain deep
understandings of the concepts. The COGs units (give) more time to
engage deeply with concepts and ideas within a unit.”
- Stage 1 teacher, Wirreanda Public School, Hunter/Central Coast region
“When I trialled Global Society as my first COG it was like climbing a
mountain. However, my students’ work was unbelievable and they are
still recalling activities and knowledge from the unit. UWS student
teachers and Year 7 teachers were most impressed with students’
achievements in Creative Arts.”
– Stage 3 teacher, William Dean Public School, western Sydney region
“When students left the classroom to go to another class they
undertook activities that related to the COG. This gave students an
holistic learning experience where they were able to link learning
experiences together.”
- Harrington Street Public School, south western Sydney region
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Sample Timetables
• reflect policy advice that 50% of available
teaching time be allocated to English and
Mathematics
• 40% of teaching time is allocated to the other
KLAs and the mandatory two hours of physical
activity (includes 60 minutes of sport in years 3-6)
• 10% is additional time to be used to meet school
priorities (p.4 Getting the balance right)
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Sport
9:00 –
11:00
English
English
English
English
English
COG
SRE
11:00 –
11:20
Recess
PE
PE
PE
Maths
11:20 –
1:00
Maths
Maths
Maths
Maths
COG
COG
COG
COG
1:00 –
1:55
1:55 –
3:00
Lunch
COG
COG
COG
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
COG
Programming for English and
Mathematics
• The English program will identify systematic and
explicit teaching of talking and listening, reading
and writing
• The Mathematics program will provide a sequential
learning program that builds on strategies that
students are currently using to solve problems
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections: English, Mathematics and COGs
• COGs may inform English and Mathematics
The content from a COGs learning experience (e.g. a poster or a
graph) can be used as the context for teaching a specific aspect of
English or Mathematics.
• English and Mathematics may inform COGs
An English or Mathematics lesson (e.g. a shared book or features of a
graph) can provide the skills and understanding required for a COGs
lesson.
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections: COGs in the classroom
(organisation)
“COGs allow for … professional dialogue and planning with colleagues, including the
teacher-librarian, computing teacher and RFF teacher, ensures consistency. We
have differentiated the COGs for our GATS class. COGs work well with teachers
who share a class. “
- Ryde East Public School, northern Sydney region
“We have a large 90% NESB school. COGs is working well through a whole school,
integrated approach that includes teachers of ESL, library, community language and
computers.”
- Harrington Street Public School, south western Sydney region
“We have adapted the material to suit the specific learning needs of our students.
This year we have developed a scope and sequence to ensure all outcomes are
addressed throughout a stage. We involve our community language, ESL, RFF and
teacher-librarian in taking part of each unit.
- Eastlakes Public School, Sydney region
“All our staff are using COGs. We plan our day around literacy, numeracy and COGs
and we have organised our resources around COGs.”
- William Dean Public School, western Sydney region
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making connections: COGs in the classroom (QT)
“Elements of QT are embedded in the learning tasks. We
modify units to suit our students’ needs but both our students
and parents understand the connections.”
- Harrington Street Public School, south western Sydney region
“COGs has provided the foundation for our quality teaching
journey. Students and parents were surveyed pre- and posttrialling of our COG units. Results revealed significant
increases (greater than 10%) in parent and student perceptions
of student self- regulation, self-direction, knowledge
integration and explicit quality criteria. The implementation of
COGs has enhanced pedagogy and collegiality and streamlined
curriculum planning. COG units are adapted to reflect student,
teacher and community needs.”
- Wirreanda Public School, Hunter/Central Coast region
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
Making further connections
• Updated materials available on the website:
http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/
(further support in assessment of all KLAs, and English and
Mathematics programming will be progressively added to the site)
• Trial, give feedback, work samples, ideas…
Contact us by email:
[email protected]
© 2006 NSW Department of Education and Training
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Making connections - Curriculum Support